Crosstown rivalry thrives in the spotlight

first_imgWith one week remaining in the regular season, the participants for the 2013 Pac-12 championship game have been determined — and neither the Bruins nor the Trojans made the cut. Stanford and Arizona State will do battle with a berth to the 100th Rose Bowl Game.Unlike last season, this year’s rendition of the Battle for Los Angeles will have no implications on each team’s Rose Bowl hopes, but that doesn’t mean that the game will lack in meaning. The crosstown showdown between the two schools has ramped up in intensity in recent years, setting up what should be yet another classic matchup in what has been one of college football’s most storied rivalries.After UCLA’s 38-28 win over USC last season, many fans and analysts saw the Bruins’ reclaiming of the Victory Bell as a changing of the guard. The loss continued the Trojans’ downward spiral that led to a well-publicized 7-6 final record, complete with an alleged post-Sun Bowl brawl and a mass exodus of previously committed recruits, some of whom ended up enrolling at UCLA. Following the defeat, the balance of power had shifted toward Westwood, many believed, and those in powder blue and gold took the opportunity to bask in their newfound success.“We’re able to compete with them,” UCLA offensive lineman Xavier Su’a-Filo said about USC in the preseason. “We’re able to play them and look forward to that game. Being able to get that win against them last year was great, and it was huge for our program.”Fairly tame comments, to be sure, but Su’a-Filo’s remarks were indicative that the mystique that USC had accrued after winning 12 out of 13 matchups from 1999 to 2011 had faded. But following the Trojans’ slow start this season that included an embarrassing 10-7 loss at home against Washington State, the chirping from across town heated up.“Knowing that we’re going to beat them again this year … Especially two years ago when they beat us 50-0. We owe them a little bit,” UCLA wide receiver Shaquelle Evans told ESPN 710 AM in September. “This year, we’re going to try to embarrass them, honestly. They’re struggling, it’s just awesome to see that. I hate them, so I’m just loving it. I’ve always hated them.”Evans’ comments are part of why the rivalry between USC and UCLA is, in my opinion, the best rivalry in college sports. I realize that the word “best” as it applies to comparing rivalries is extremely subjective, so I’ll do my best to defend this position.To my knowledge, it’s the only rivalry in which two schools share a city, and I can’t think of any two schools that are closer than the 14 miles that separate USC and UCLA. Unlike other high-profile rivalries, such as Duke-North Carolina in basketball and Auburn-Alabama in football, the rivalry applies to all sports, not just one. The fight for supremacy in Los Angeles is truly a year-round event.During my lifetime, the rivalry has churned out truly memorable moments, despite being completely one-sided in favor of USC. The Trojans’ 27-0 domination of the Bruins in 2001 heralded the beginning of former USC coach Pete Carroll’s dynasty. In 2005, USC beat UCLA 66-19 in a game that was even more lopsided than the score indicates. The Bruins kept the Trojans from playing in the national championship game in 2006 with a memorable 13-9 win at the Rose Bowl, and as Evans’ comments suggest, few have forgotten USC’s 50-0 dismantling of UCLA in 2011.Which brings us to this season. As mentioned, nothing will be decided on Saturday except which color the Victory Bell will be painted for the next 365 days, but in a rivalry as storied and intense as this one, that’s really all that needs to be said to pique people’s interest. The game has enough hype around it that it was selected for the primetime 5 p.m. slot on ABC, and as of the writing of this column, the cheapest ticket available for purchase on StubHub was $110. The Coliseum is expected to be sold out for the second consecutive game, ensuring that the atmosphere will be fitting for a game of this magnitude.In the days leading up to USC’s upset over Stanford, the popular opinion among students was that Stanford, who had defeated USC in four consecutive seasons, was the team that the Trojan faithful really wanted to beat. Many saw the Cardinal as USC’s most-hated rival, an opinion that could be defended by referencing the fans’ storming of the field after the upset was complete.But as a native Southern Californian who has grown up immersed in the USC-UCLA rivalry, I can say with great confidence that this is not the case. Evans’ comments got a rise out of USC fans, but the reality is that he was simply saying what anyone else would say (if they were being honest). The Trojan Marching Band doesn’t play a song dedicated to insulting Stanford, and I’m guessing that it won’t be adding one anytime soon.Because if you’re a Trojan, no matter what team USC plays, you’re always ready to chant “UCLA sucks” at the top of your lungs — which is why, no matter the teams’ records, the game will always be meaningful in the Southland. “Inside the 20s” runs on Tuesdays. To comment on this story, email Nick at nselbe@usc.edu or visit dailytrojan.com.Follow Nick on Twitter @NickSelbelast_img read more

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Lisa Hanna, Possible future People’s National Party leader, Shines in Jamaica’s…

first_imgAt the 1993 pageant in South Africa, Hanna was the popular winner of the crown, becoming the third Jamaican woman to do so. Upon completing her reign as Miss World, which included attending the installation of Nelson Mandela as the first Black president of apartheid-free South Africa, Lisa returned to Jamaica to focus on her tertiary education. In 1998, she completed a bachelor degree in media and communication, followed by her master’s in communication studies in 2000—both at the University of the West Indies in Mona, Jamaica.  Lisa Hanna during the National Debates on August 25th. In 2003, Hanna tried her hand in broadcasting, hosting the Jamaican talk show “Our Voices” and then later, in the United States, as a guest presenter on “Xtra.”  In her opening statement, she displayed eloquence and poise, while posing a clear and convincing argument for the PNP’s social policies. She posited that her party “has given the majority of Jamaicans access to educational opportunities, good healthcare and social services” because it is the party that believes in “social investment and not social control.” Political analysts in Jamaica are speculating should the PNP, which is far behind in the polls, lose the next general elections, party leader Dr. Peter Phillips would be strongly challenged, or could resign, and Hanna would be one of the contenders. It is also speculated if the PNP even wins, Phillips, who has serious health challenges could still resign, and again, Hanna is seen as a contender to succeed him in this scenario.  The former Miss World had completely thrown herself into university life, with a string of achievements, including building a computer lab in the Faculty of Arts as her final-year project.  It was by chance that Lisa Hanna ended up on the People’s National Party’s (PNP) team for the first national debate, on social issues, leading up to Jamaica’s general election on September 3.  At the first of three political debates, held on August 25, Hanna was the clear leader of the PNP team, displaying a passion for politics and the Jamaican people as well as confidence that her party will form the next government.  And, the highly popular party treasurer and former minister of youth and culture—who some political pundits see as a possible leader of the PNP in the not-too-distant future—took full advantage of the opportunity. center_img Over the last few years, as the leadership of the PNP has come under scrutiny, Lisa Hanna has emerged as one of the party’s bright stars, with many supporters even suggesting that she would be the best fit for party leader. Her slew of admirers from around the world believe with their own certainty that she is more than just a pretty face. And her track record as a leader has also supported that argument. Hanna was born in St. Mary in 1975, to Rene Hanna, a farmer, and Dorothy Hanna, a hairdresser in St. Ann. The Hannas moved to Kingston where she attended the Queens All-Girls High School in St. Andrew. High School was Hanna’s training ground for politics, as she blossomed as a student counsellor, house captain, games captain and eventually, head girl. At the end of her high school career, when her other classmates were beginning to look at colleges, the 18-year-old turned her attention to beauty pageants and entered the Miss World pageant.  Continuing her lifetime theme of leadership, Lisa Hanna became Jamaica’s youngest female member of Parliament in 2007 when she contested and won the seat for South-East St‬. Ann. During that time, she was also appointed as the opposition spokesperson on information, youth and culture. At the 2011 general elections, the PNP came into power and she was subsequently appointed as minister of youth and culture by former Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller, serving in that portfolio from 2012 to 2016 when the PNP lost the general elections.  She then ripped into the leadership of the Jamaica Labor Party (JLP), suggesting that in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, it had “exacerbated the desperation and anxiety of Jamaican people.” She claimed that the PNP has always been the party to take Jamaica out of periods of adversity and is committed to doing it again if they win the elections. Hanna is currently married to Jamaican business giant, Richard Lake. She has one son, Alexander Panton, from a previous marriage to former senator and businessman, David Panton. During her tenure as minister of youth and culture, she formed an inter-ministerial committee for children, which collectively worked with all ministries and children’s agencies to lobby for children. The committee had several achievements, including the separation of children from adult correctional facilities and police lock-ups, the introduction of the Arts For Life Program at the South Camp Facility for Girls, the allocation of increased resources to help find missing children, and much more. She also spearheaded the successful lobby for Jamaica’s first-ever election to UNESCO’s World Heritage Committee leading to Jamaica’s Blue and John Crow Mountains’ dedication as an official World Heritage Site. She currently serves as the shadow minister of foreign affairs and foreign trade. She has been re-elected twice as MP for South-East St. Ann. last_img read more

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