Red Bluff Tritons compete in Anderson Invitational swim meet

first_imgAnderson >> The Red Bluff Tritons opened the summer swim season at West Valley High School this past weekend in the Anderson Invitational Swim Meet.Twenty-two swimmers ages 5-17 competed in individual and relay events in the heavy rain on Friday evening through the rising temperatures of Sunday afternoon.Male top performers included Nico Munoz — first place overall, boys age 11-12; Macaiah Niles — third place overall, boys age 7-8; Macalan Niles — first place overall, boys age 6 and under.Fem …last_img read more

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Passionate, respected assistant coach who worked for Raiders, Cal, Stanford dies at 72

first_imgGunther Cunningham, who spent a lifetime as a football coach, including stops with Stanford, Cal and the Los Angeles Raiders, died Saturday. He was 72.The announcement was made by the Detroit Lions, for whom Cunningham worked last. The Detroit Free Press reported that the one-time Walnut Creek resident died of cancer.“Gunther Cunningham will forever be remembered as one of the great men of our game,” the Lions said in a statement. “He left a lasting impact on every person who was fortunate …last_img read more

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Gardening weed ID class July 6

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Secrest Arboretum, like gardens everywhere, has its share of weeds. And Paul Snyder, who works there as a program assistant, has seen their best and worst.Canada thistle, common moonseed and marestail are the toughest to manage, Snyder said.“Moonseed completely smothers everything,” he said. “Marestail has become resistant to glyphosate (a weed killer) and produces thousands of tiny seeds.“Jumpseed and bittersweet are the sneakiest. They have a knack for blending in with other plants.”Canada thistle, however, is the prettiest, Snyder said.It has “wonderful flowers that smell great,” he said.On July 6, participants will discover those weeds and others — and specifically how to identify and control them — in the arboretum’s Summer Weed ID Class. It’s from 8 to 10 a.m. Snyder will be the instructor.The 115-acre arboretum is at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster, about an hour south of Cleveland. OARDC scientists use the arboretum for research on landscape plants, while thousands of people visit its display gardens every year.Those gardens, it seems, have a secret.“Our landscape beds aren’t spotless like everyone thinks,” Snyder said. “You just have to know what to look for.”The class will give weed-spotting tips. It also will share details on the arboretum’s own weed control practices, including a new strategy against marestail being tried for the first time this summer.Marestail is a bear to control, Snyder said.“If you spray it with glyphosate, it branches and becomes almost impossible to pull because it snaps off. But if you pull it, you disrupt the soil and let even more of them grow,” he said.Registration for the class is $10 for members of the Friends of Secrest Arboretum and $15 for nonmembers. Details and a link to register are at go.osu.edu/SummerWeedID. Call 330-263-3761 for more information.The class will meet in the arboretum’s Jack and Deb Miller Pavilion.OARDC, which is at 1680 Madison Ave. in Wooster, is the research arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University.last_img read more

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Your Questions Answered: International Lifestyle Recommendations for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

first_imgQ: I don’t understand the lack of effect regarding a lower carb diet. as a nutritionist, when I have patients who have low blood sugar in relation to PCOS, the smaller meals, lower carb and protein/good fat with each meal has stopped the hypoglycemia in every patient that I have tried this with. A: To date, very few studies have evaluated the role of macronutrient composition in health outcomes in PCOS. Therefore, there is insufficient evidence to generate a population-level recommendation that any specific diet is better than any other for PCOS. However, we appreciate that there is anecdotal evidence that low carbohydrate / high protein diets can work well in women affected by the condition. Providers can feel comfortable individualizing care – so long as there are no known adverse effects.Q: How do you address self-image in counseling?A: Several studies have shown that women with PCOS have lower self-confidence related to body image. Lower self-confidence can be exacerbated by a patient’s beliefs that it is more difficult for her to lose weight (and easier for her to gain weight). Lower self-confidence may increase risk for anxiety and depression. Studies have also revealed that women with PCOS often feel “unfeminine,” especially if they live with absent menstrual cycles and male-patterned hair growth. We recommend listening to a patient’s  concerns related to nutrition and weight loss and paying close attention to how she views herself in these conversations. Some potential things to consider:Does she blame herself for developing PCOS / infertility?If so, then emphasize that there are many unknown causes of PCOS / infertility and that healthy diet behaviors have been shown to be effective in improving PCOS outcomes. Empathy and social support from clinicians are key to combating negative self-image. What is her overall objective for coming to the visit?If she keeps describing factors associated with her appearance, then acknowledge her feelings while reframing her mindset to appreciate other factors outside of physical attributes. For example, ask about her level of fatigue or the types of activities that she would like to do as she loses weight. Then, explain how a healthy diet and increased physical activity can help. International Lifestyle Recommendations for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)If you missed this great webinar Dietitians can still earn 1.0 CPEU by watching the video at https://militaryfamilieslearningnetwork.org/event/22060/  Questions Q: Is PCOS on the rise in the US and/or around the world?A: The current worldwide prevalence of PCOS is estimated to be 8 – 13%. However, there continues to be substantial debate over the most appropriate criteria to diagnose the condition, as well as differences in how PCOS is evaluated across providers, health centers, and countries. These issues make it challenging to capture changes in the prevalence of the condition over time. Nonetheless, because obesity is linked to the pathogenesis of PCOS, it is possible that the rising prevalence of obesity may be associated with an increase in the number of women affected by PCOS. Longitudinal, observational studies are needed to corroborate such a relationship, though.Q: How is PCOS diagnosed? And is it ever something that can be cured/go away?A: PCOS is diagnosed based on the combined presence of two of three cardinal features: (1) anovulation (which is judged by evidence of irregular menstrual cycles), (2) androgen excess (which is judged by evidence of male-patterned hair growth [hirsutism] or elevated circulating androgens), and (3) polycystic ovarian morphology (which is judged by evidence of increased antral follicle number or ovarian size on ultrasonography). Different lifestyle and pharmacologic treatments can be used to reduce the severity of PCOS, but we do not know whether the condition can be “cured,” per se. The answer likely depends on the etiology of PCOS – that is, whether it is of genetic or environmental origin.Q: What are your opinions on intuitive eating and PCOS, which seems to be a growing approach to treat PCOS? Intuitive eating seems to go against the idea of caloric restriction.A: The main assumption of intuitive eating is that the mind and body are connected and that as a result, we can be aware of our body’s hunger and satiety cues. There are 10 principles, most of which remove the negative stigma surrounding food and weight while refuting the one-size-fits-all approach to eating. However, these principles do not need to be mutually exclusive from caloric restriction and can be addressed based on individual patient and clinician preferences. After all, if we listen to our body’s cues and stop eating when we feel full, then we will likely be eating fewer calories.Some studies have reported that women with PCOS have lower cholecystokinin[1] and meal-stimulated ghrelin secretion than women without PCOS.[2] These results suggest that women with PCOS are more likely to be hungry and unsatiated after meals, indicating that the mind-body connection may be disrupted in PCOS. Therefore, intuitive eating may be more difficult for women with PCOS. However, there are certain philosophies that may resonate with some patients more than others. Literature outside of PCOS has shown that in engaged individuals, the action of tracking their diet can help an individual learn about their eating habits and self-monitor their dietary intake. Calories can serve as a traditional benchmark for patients that prefer objective measures with defined goals.If the intuitive eating approach helps to stimulate weight loss in women with PCOS, then that is great, too! In such cases, we strongly encourage using the shared care approach. For example, provide a list of the principles of intuitive eating and ask the patient about the principles that they can see themselves adopting into their lives. Then, based on their answers, create a plan with the patient to encourage healthy eating behaviors using SMART (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, Timely) goals.Q: Do you recommend chromium supplements for women with PCOS?A: The evidence regarding the role of dietary supplements in PCOS is heterogeneous and still emerging. Experts agree that there is insufficient high-quality data, at this point, to generate population-level clinical recommendations. Some randomized controlled trials have shown that chromium supplements reduce insulin resistance in women with PCOS. However, there is no evidence to suggest that women with PCOS exhibit deficiencies in chromium, wherein supplementation would be expected to exert a physiologically beneficial effect. Given that high doses of chromium can cause liver or kidney damage, we urge caution in recommending these dietary supplements until more evidence is available.Q: I am curious about the outcomes or impacts of PCOS as they related to age of presentation?A: PCOS imparts serious consequences on women’s health across the lifespan. Menstrual cyclicity, androgen status, and ovarian morphology (i.e., the diagnostic features of PCOS) are normally altered during the pubertal and menopausal transitions. Efforts are currently ongoing to define abnormality at these life stages, but age-related phenotypes of PCOS remain poorly defined. Some longitudinal studies have shown that menstrual cycles can become more regular, androgens can decline, and follicle number and ovarian size can decrease in post-menopausal women with PCOS. Importantly, although risk factors emerge earlier in life, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and gynecologic cancers (i.e., common comorbidities of PCOS) are more likely to effect women in later decades of life.Q: What about the use of metformin for PCOS? Is metformin used with women with PCOS?A: Metformin is recommended for the management of weight, metabolic, and reproductive outcomes in women with PCOS. It may be used alone or in combination with lifestyle or other pharmacologic therapies. It may be especially helpful in cases where lifestyle changes cannot achieve desired goals and/or in women with high metabolic risk, e.g., those with risk factors for impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes mellitus.Q: All these recommendations sound like the same guidelines that should be followed for anyone overweight/obese. So, is there really anything different than for treating PCOS?A: Yes, the recent International Evidence-based Guideline for the Assessment and Management of PCOS supports the use of population-level recommendations for dietary intake and physical activity. Use of population-level recommendations is based on evidence that healthy lifestyle approaches (e.g., caloric restriction in obese patients, and balanced dietary composition and physical activity in all patients) can improve the metabolic features of PCOS. However, women with PCOS demonstrate an increased risk for psychological issues (i.e., anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, eating disorders) and chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, gynecologic cancers) compared to the general population. Women with PCOS also report poorer perceived control over their health outcomes and lower levels of social support than women with PCOS. Collectively, the main difference from a treatment perspective is that there is a clear need for healthcare providers to acknowledge these unique risk factors and concerns.Q: There seems to be quite a bit of anecdotal evidence for myo-inositol supplementation. Thoughts?A: Myo-inositol is a sugar alcohol and may influence hormones that are dysregulated in PCOS, such as follicle-stimulating hormone and insulin. Some studies have shown that myo-inositol improves aspects of ovulatory function, due in part to the role of hyperinsulinemia in anovulation and the beneficial effect of myo-inositol on insulin resistance. However, the studies are heterogeneous with differing definitions of PCOS, inclusion and exclusion criteria, and dose and duration of treatment. Until more consistent evidence is available, we are cautious about recommending myo-inositol to treat the symptoms of PCOS to prevent raising false hope in patients.center_img How does she conquer slips (i.e., short-term breaks from healthy behavior practices) and slides (i.e., extended breaks)?Emphasize that slips are bound to happen for everyone but will not hurt her progress.Ask her how she deals with slips to prevent them from turning into slides.Some strategies might include identifying high risk situations, visualizing how one would deal with that situation, and encouraging positive thinking by keeping things in perspective. Q: When were the women diagnosed in these studies? If they had already been diagnosed, they were probably trying to eat better.A: In some of the studies that examined baseline differences in diet and physical activity between women with and without PCOS, women were categorized into groups based on their existing diagnosis of PCOS. However, there were other studies that categorized women using internal diagnostic criteria, without revealing to the women that their symptoms were consistent with PCOS. The number of women who had received official diagnoses was not usually reported in these studies. It is tough to confirm with existing evidence, but we agree that reverse causation may exist, and that woman may have improved their lifestyle behaviors following their diagnosis of PCOS.Q: Do you think that the recommendation of 300 mins of moderate exercise or 150 mins of vigorous exercise is realistic?A: We believe that the recommendation is realistic, particularly because the newest Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans accept all bouts of physical activity (i.e., not just 10 minutes) as counting towards the goals of 150 – 300 minutes. To help patients meet the recommendations, we suggest the use of stepwise goal setting, which depends on how adherent a patient is to physical activity goals. It is helpful to keep in mind that exercise includes structured activities (e.g., running on a treadmill), while physical activity reflects any body movement that uses energy (e.g., household activities).Q: Long question (sorry!) re: difficulty losing weight, whenever you can answer – I worked with a pt with PCOS who according to her diet recall significantly reduced portions and increased exercise, however, her weight dramatically continued to increase during the months that we worked together. She was frustrated and it was difficult for me as well because I wasn’t sure what else to tell her to do- she couldn’t adjust/reduce her diet any further and her activity was consistent. Have you seen anything like this in your experience?A: We can definitely relate to such a scenario. Many of our participants with PCOS have shared similar experiences with us. Besides the potential impact of medication, there are a few things that come to our minds that might be helpful to discuss:What is her normal daily caloric intake? There is some evidence to suggest that women with PCOS have lower basal metabolic rates than women without PCOS and that excess visceral fat can modulate energy balance. Anecdotally, some of our participants have been so committed to weight loss, that they have reduced their caloric intake to <1000 calories per day, likely further slowing their metabolism. Moderate caloric reduction (i.e., by 500 calories per day) has been shown to be most effective for weight loss in this population; anything more could be counter-productive.How likely is she to use a mobile diet tracking app and would she consider it to be a convenient tool to use? For patients who are engaged and very interested in losing weight, such a tool can be helpful for identifying potential areas to target for weight loss. Portion sizes can be challenging to estimate, so apps that provide an opportunity to take pictures of meals/snacks may be effective. Additionally, tracking foods in real-time creates self-awareness of dietary behaviors and has been shown to lead to greater weight loss over time.What is her normal level of physical activity? Some patients may not understand the definition of “moderate intensity physical activity” and consequently may perform less activity. We like to recommend that, during bouts of physical activity, patients should reach a level of exertion where they can still talk but cannot sing. Physical activity of any kind can be helpful in women with PCOS.We are happy to answer other questions or provide further explanation! Please feel free to reach us at the following email addresses:Annie W Lin (lin@northwestern.edu)Brittany Y Jarrett (byj4@cornell.edu)References[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15624269 [2] https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1933719117728803?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3Dpubmedlast_img read more

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Amit Shah unveils statue of Deendayal Upadhyaya in Bhopal

first_imgBJP president Amit Shah unveiled in Bhopal on Friday a statue of Deendayal Upadhyaya, founder of the erstwhile Jan Sangh and the party’s ideologue.Madhya Pradesh Chief Minister Shivraj Singh Chouhan and Bhopal Mayor Alok Sharma were present as Mr. Shah unveiled the statue near the city’s Lal Ghati square.Mr. Shah was accorded a warm welcome by the Chief Minister and other party leaders, including Kailash Vijaywargiya and Prabhat Jha and State party president Nandkumar Singh Chauhan the Raja Bhoj Airport.A large number of BJP workers, many of them sporting saffron turbans, led Mr. Shah’s entourage to the party office.Local party functionaries said among those who turned up to greet Mr. Shah while on his way to the party office were members of the Muslim community.Packed scheduleMr. Shah will attend a series of meetings with local party leaders, including State unit office-bearers, central office-bearers, core group members, State spokespersons, MPs, MLAs, district presidents, among others, during his hectic three-day visit, Mr. Chauhan said.Central office-bearers from the State will also attend the brainstorming sessions.Mr. Shah will address intellectuals and meritorious students, besides releasing a book written by Kailash Narayan Sarang.The visit is part of the BJP chief’s 110-day nationwide tour to strengthen and expand the party’s support base ahead of the 2019 general elections.Assembly polls in Madhya Pradesh, where the BJP has been in power for over a decade, are due next year.last_img read more

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UNESCO seeks report on conservation of Darjeeling Toy Train

first_imgUNESCO has asked the Indian Railways to submit a report by next February on the state of conservation of the Darjeeling Himalayan Railways (DHR) after the UN body found the trains and tracks of the world heritage site were suffering from “insufficient maintenance”.UNESCO’s World Heritage Committee in a report, submitted in its 43rd session held in Baku, Republic of Azerbaijan, on June 30, said many of the station buildings which are identified as major attributes of the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) have “lost original fabric and seriously deteriorated” since the inscription of the property on the World Heritage list in 1999 and its subsequent extensions in 2004 and 2008.last_img read more

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Premier12: US Beats Mexico, 6-1

first_imgTweetPinShare0 Shares TOKYO — The United States scored five runs in the fourth inning to beat Mexico 6-1 and reach the Premier12 baseball final on Nov. 20.The U.S., made up of players not on 40-man MLB rosters, takes on South Korea in the final on Nov. 21. The Koreans beat Japan 4-3 on Nov. 19.“I was very impressed with the Korean team,” U.S. manager Willie Randolph said. “They came back against Japan and are a very good team, but right now we feel like we are the team to beat.”Mexico took a 1-0 lead in the fourth on a solo homer by Humberto Sosa, but the U.S. quickly rallied at Tokyo Dome.After Adam Frazier’s two-out RBI single, Dan Rohlfing hit a two-run double to make it 3-1.Elliot Soto followed with a single to right, driving in Rohlfing and advancing to third on an error.Jacob May capped the five-run outburst with a line drive that scored Soto.Jarret Grube was supposed to start for the U.S. but had a stiff neck so Randolph went with Zeke Spruill on short notice. The right-hander gave up one run on five hits over five innings for the win.“Spruill did an outstanding job,” Randolph said.last_img read more

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GRAND FINALS SUMMARY- QSST DOUBLE!

first_imgQSST have made it a golden day at the 2004 National 18 Years Touch Football Championships, claiming both the Mens and Womens titles. The match up of QSST and NSWCHS in the Womens grand final was highly anticipated, with NSWCHS having taken the 2003 title from QSST. Queensland were out to claim it back and opened the scoring with Emily Hopkin’s great step allowing Gemma Etheridge to cross and score. An intercept from NSW’s Tegan Considine brought the crowd to their feet, which then lifted even more as Queensland’s Teneille Shaw chased 25 metres to touch Considine. With neither team able to score for the remaining time in the first half, it was Nicole McHugh who brought NSW back to even with a touchdown to open the second half. This was as close to winning as NSW would get though, with Queensland’s captain Courtney Hipperson scoring to give her side a 2-1 lead. Belinda Hammett dived across the line for a 3-1 advantage to Queensland before the NSW side could bring it back to 3-2 with nine minutes still to play. NSW looked as though they were still in with a chance as the Queensland girls failed to make the most of their opportunities and extend their lead. When Delwyn Tupuhi and Hipperson both added to the Queensland tally, a 5-2 lead was too much for the NSW girls. With five minutes to go the NSW side also lost experienced Australian representative Kirstie Jenkins to an injury and the game was all but over. For Queensland coach Peter Bell, the win was a reward for how hard his players have worked. “They’ve put in a lot of training for this and they’re a great group of girls,” Bell said. Captain Courtney Hipperson agreed. “It feels awesome, we’ve had great teamwork and really bonded as a team, we knew we were good enough to win this and we came here to do that,” Hipperson said. In the Mens match QSST were out to defend their 2003 title and opened the scoring quickly through Lyall Darby. It was a free flowing first half, with the scores locked at 2-2 after just ten minutes of play. In the Mens grand final it was again a meeting between QSST and NSWCHS, with the Queensland Men looking to defend their 2003 title. Scoring flowed freely in the first half, with QSST beginning strongly on the back of a Lyall Darby opening touchdown and a Jerome Waitohi intercept and touchdown. NSWCHS moved into gear and the score was back to 2-2 before Queensland ran in another two touchdowns to take a 4-2 lead. Australian representative Pat Smith showed some of his classy stepping to bring NSW back to a 4-3 deficit and brought the crowd into the match. Down 5-3 at half time, NSWCHS opened the second half scoring but when Queensland replied immediately through Waitohi’s second intercept and touchdown, the score went to 6-4. NSWCHS couldn’t break through the Queensland defense again, allowing QSST to take the title with the score of 6-4. For Queensland coach Peter Robinson, the relief was obvious. “I’m really proud of the way these boys have played, they’ve had to adjust to a lot of different styles of play, it’s been a long week, but they really do deserve this,” Robinson said. “NSWCHS are a great side, they have a lot of talent and they played really well, it was a very tough week.” By Rachel Moyle, media@austouch.com.aulast_img read more

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In The Spotlight – Queensland Pride

first_imgIn the 13th edition of In The Spotlight, the Queensland Pride’s Peta Rogerson speaks about her team’s preparation in the lead up to the Elite Eight. How does it feel to be a part of the 2011 Elite Eight series? It is a bit of a different feeling than usual, purely because we are in new teams with different combinations of players and different teams to play against compared to the past NTL format.  But it is very exciting to think that you will be playing against the best players in Australia.  Every game will be extremely high level and competitive – and I will love that.How is your team’s preparation going in the lead up to the event?Our team has had an excellent preparation. We met before Christmas to get a general idea of where our fitness and skills were at and after a small Christmas break we got stuck into training most weekends as a group from mid-January.  Because our team is a little spread out (Brisbane, Toowoomba and Sunshine Coast) we have also trained in smaller groups mid-week.  Training has had a big focus on improving our ball skills.  We are hoping that this will help with all of those little one per centers things that can be so crucial in a pressure game.  What would you say are the strengths of your team?Well without sounding bias I think we have a lot of strengths: a good mix of experience and youth, good skills, plenty of speedy players, unknown factor against New South Wales teams, very gutsy and most importantly we have a lot of fun playing together.Who do you expect to be your toughest opponents?I don’t think there will be any easy games, but I think our toughest will be against New South Wales Country Mavericks.  What would it mean to you to win the Elite Eight series?When you think about it the Elite Eight series will be the best Touch competition played in the world, so to win it with our group of girls that I love would be awesome.  Stay tuned to the website for the upcoming editions of In The Spotlight, which will feature every team in the Elite Eight series. To keep up-to-date with all of the latest news and information in the lead up to and during the 2011 X-Blades National Touch League, go to www.ntl.mytouchfooty.com and don’t forget to become a fan of Touch Football Australia on Facebook by clicking on the following link:http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Touch-Football-Australia/384949403384last_img read more

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