University hosts activities night

first_imgThousands of Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s undergraduate students flooded the Joyce Center Tuesday at the annual Activities Night, sponsored by the Student Activities Office (SAO). “I visited the booths for Student Union Board (SUB), Habitat for Humanity and even the Hawaii Club,” she said. “I love being able to come out and see so many different options.” Teamwork for Tomorrow, a community outreach program designed to improve the literacy and teamwork skills of underprivileged children in South Bend, also sees a huge membership boost because of Activities Night, president and senior Elizabeth Dieckman said.   “We had about 4,100 total attendees, which is great for our groups,” Havlick said. “As a business major, I know I’d definitely like to get started with the Student International Business Council (SIBC),” he said.  “I’m excited to see all of the other possibilities that exist for involvement on campus.” “I think many new students are surprised to see how large our club is because Notre Dame is often stereotyped as being so conservative,” she said.  “Ultimately, we’re hoping to attract all interested freshmen and get our message out there.” Freshman Will Cronin said he thought Activities Night was a great way for first-year students to get involved in the Notre Dame community and see what opportunities are available to them. “We see a big surge during election years, which will be especially important as we campaign for Congressman Joe Donnelly’s reelection in November,” she said. center_img Flanagan said the 2009-10 Club of the Year will also continue its service events with the Center for the Homeless. Students visited the booths of over 270 campus clubs and organizations, along with a variety of local groups and agencies, Mary Kate Havlik, Student Programs Coordinator, said.  Cronin said he was also hoping to become an active member of the College Republicans.  College Democrats co-president Eileen Flanagan said her club is expecting a large increase in membership this year. Dieckman said about 30 students signed up to volunteer as tutors this year. Sophomore Kat Chew said she was looking for a way to get more directly involved in student life, as well as an opportunity to volunteer in the local community. “We have a record number of kids signed up this year and this our most important night to make connections and recruit tutors for them,” she said.last_img read more

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UN Security Council stalemate over virus

first_imgThe draft proposal, drawn up late last week by Estonia, highlights “growing concern about the unprecedented extent of the COVID-19 outbreak in the world, which may constitute a threat to international peace and security.”It also calls for “full transparency” over the outbreak — wording seen by some to allude to US criticism of government secrecy in China, where the virus first emerged.”The members of the Security Council urge the member states to put more emphasis on helping the ones most exposed and vulnerable to the virus and the populations in dire humanitarian situations,” the draft, seen by AFP, says.It adds that “no country can succeed alone.” Uncertain schedule World Health Organization chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus warned on Monday that the pandemic was clearly “accelerating” as the number of deaths surged close to 16,000, with over 350,000 declared infections.The Security Council, chaired in March by China, has not met since March 12, with most UN staff and diplomats from the national missions working from home to avoid infection, though the New York headquarters remains open.On Thursday it must renew the mandate of UN experts responsible for sanctions imposed on North Korea for one year and extend the peace mission in Somalia for one year.According to diplomats, the council must also extend the peacekeepers’ mission in Darfur by two months, without modifying the numbers of troops.Originally, the Security Council was supposed to decide on a gradual withdrawal to create at the end of October a political mission in Sudan and close its peacekeeping operation in Darfur.Council meetings on Syria andTopics : A UN Security Council declaration requires the support of all 15 members to be adopted and published.center_img The UN Security Council, which has not met for 12 days due to the coronavirus outbreak, is deeply divided over a proposed declaration on the crisis and holding “virtual” meetings to vote on resolutions, diplomatic sources said Monday.The impasse comes as world leaders struggle to respond to the pandemic, with rivals US and China engaged in a war of words as medical experts plead for unified action.”South Africa [a non-permanent council member] rejected [the proposed declaration] first. Russia and China engaged earlier, but later on also blocked it,” a source told AFP.last_img read more

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