This Brisbane house sold for less than a one-bedroom unit

first_imgThis Brisbane property sold for $200,000 less than the city’s median house price.YOU snooze, you lose.This two-bedroom cottage on 710sq m of land at 83 Blackwood Rd, Deagon was looking for “offers over $310,000” — and has just gone unconditional for $320,000 — a figure less than its most recent land valuation for rates assessment. The home has flaws, but the price can’t be beat.It’s also below the $330,000 asking price for this one-bedroom, 60sq m unit at 108 Albert Street, Brisbane — an apartment one-twelfth the size of the Deagon home’s land.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home2 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor2 hours ago For $10,000 more than Blackwood Rd, Deagon, you could have this tiny one-bedroom unit in the city.The Deagon property included a work shed and covered car accommodation, and there was potential to improve, according to Ray White sales consultant, Catherine O’Keeffe.“All the interest I had had been from renovators, which actually surprised me, because I thought most of the interest would be from people wanting to knock it down,” Ms O’Keeffe said.center_img The property provided for a large flat lot in a gentrifying street.Ms O’Keeffe said gentrification in Blackwood Rd, and more widely across Deagon, was well underway.“There are actually about five new houses in that street,” she said.“Deagon is an absolute cracker of a suburb. It’s got three train stations that you can walk to, so it doesn’t matter where you are in Deagon, you can walk to a train station,” Ms O’Keeffe said.“And the bikeway that goes right across Brisbane, it actually goes down Blackwood Rd.”Some buyers might have been turned off by the train line to the rear, but at just 15km from the CBD, this had to be one of the most affordable and commutable homes to hit the market in Brisbane this year.Follow Kieran Clair on Twitter at @kieranclair or on Facebook at Kieran Clair — journolast_img read more

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Elizabeth Arden And Reese Witherspoon March On For Women

first_imgToday, Elizabeth Arden announces the launch of the March On campaign, featuring a limited edition lipstick, in the brand’s signature Red Door Red shade and signed by Reese Witherspoon, which will be sold globally with 100% of the proceeds donated to UN Women.Elizabeth Arden March On Campaign Print Advertisement featuring Reese WitherspoonAn early advocate of women’s rights, Elizabeth Arden famously provided red lipsticks to the suffragettes marching on Fifth Avenue in 1912. Wearing red lipstick, which wasn’t a socially acceptable practice at the time, became a symbol of the women’s movement and has remained an icon of female power to this day. As the women’s movement remains in force over 100 years later, Elizabeth Arden continues its fearless female founder’s legacy of advocating for women and honoring their ability to be forces of change in the world with the introduction of the March On campaign.The program, in partnership with the brand’s Storyteller-in-Chief and female advocate Reese Witherspoon, is designed to celebrate women’s achievements, encourage women to support other women and includes a pledge to donate $1 million to UN Women in support of their work to advance women’s issues worldwide. The limited edition March On red lipstick serves as a powerful symbol of unity and advocacy and invites women around the world to signal their support for one another.“Founded by a woman dedicated to helping women, we are inspired by our history to help change the future. March On honors this legacy not only with a philanthropic donation, but also with a campaign that asks women to unite to help each other achieve their full potential,” explains Kara Langan, Senior Vice President, Global Marketing, Elizabeth Arden. “Whether by creating female-centric support systems or propelling each other in their professional lives, when women stand together they can enact great change in the world.”“There is real strength and camaraderie in March On and the feeling that we are in this together. By bringing UN Women, Elizabeth Arden and women everywhere together we can help change women’s lives around the world for the better,” explains Reese Witherspoon. “I have the unique privilege to not only tell these women’s stories through my production company as well as my relationship with Elizabeth Arden, but I also get to encourage them to share their own stories through March On.”“A prominent entrepreneur and supporter of women’s rights, Elizabeth Arden herself is an inspirational example of the impact women can make on the world. We are pleased to embark upon a multi-year, worldwide partnership with the iconic brand to help advocate for women and girls and make their equal participation a reality,” says Tunay Firat, OIC Head of Strategic Private Sector Partnerships, UN Women. “The funds raised by Elizabeth Arden through the March On program will help strengthen UN Women’s global programming, which will lead directly to the increased responsiveness and sustainability of field-level activities.”The ongoing integrated marketing campaign will include social content, public relations, in-store activations and advertising featuring Reese Witherspoon, in addition to the limited edition lipstick. The March On Beautiful Color Lipstick in Red Door Red will be available beginning March 2018 for $26.50 on ElizabethArden.com and in department stores globally.last_img read more

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Families of MMIW frustrated with lack of information from national inquiry

first_imgTom Fennario APTN National News Harvey Michele was eating breakfast with his mother in Thunder Bay Ontario when the police walked in through the diner door.“The police came and told my mom ‘can you please come and identify this woman,’” recalls Michele. “We went to the morgue and I accompanied her, and she went in and came back and it was indeed my aunt that was found murdered.”His aunt’s name was Alice Quoquat, and 40 years later, her killer has never been found.As a result, Michele has had an interest in the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls (MMIWG).Which is why he was upset when he came across a Facebook post on Feb. 15 by Inquiry Commissioner Michèle Audette stating that the inquiry was on its way to Montreal for a meeting.“As a family member I felt as if I was left out, in this process of transparency of the inquiry,” said Michele.The meeting, as is turns out, was meant for front line workers.But that wasn’t clear to Michele.The Ojibway man said the inquiry shouldn’t be dependent on social media to disseminate information.  That in the interest of transparency, the minutes from all meetings should be readily available.“We need proactive family engagement. It seems like, to me, well, if you’re not in the loop, then you’re out of the loop,” he said.The national inquiry said better communication and transparency is on its way.For starters they point to their website where they claim interested people can sign up for a newsletter.” Our communication through the newsletter is going to be the information of how you can be involved in what’s coming up, including advisory meetings that are going to be happening throughout the regions,” said Waneek Horn-Miller, the director of community relations for the inquiry.But the inquiry has yet to actually send out a newsletter, and other than stating that hearings will start in May, no date or location has been announced.For Mohawk artist/activist Ellen Gabriel, it’s symptomatic of larger problems.She said six months in, the inquiry should be in the public hearing stage.“They have a two year mandate, a nice healthy budget and there is absolutely no excuse for the delay,” Gabriel said.Gabriel attended the Montreal meeting and came away with the feeling that instead of addressing the finer points of how to conduct the inquiry, such as how to insure police cooperation using subpoenas, it was still mired in discussing systemic social issues.“In the pre inquiry they travelled across Canada, they asked these [social issue] questions, so they had a guideline so they’re not starting from scratch, but from what I’ve seen  it’s almost like they are starting from scratch,” she said.Horn-Miller said the inquiry team is open to criticism, but emphasizes that the MMIWG inquiry is unlike any that has come before.She points to the fact that they have to navigate orders and council from all the provinces, territories, as well as the federal government.Other challenges also include security clearances for prospective employees that take six weeks, as well as significant mental health infrastructure that needs to be put in place for families.“One of the most important things that we have to understand is this kind of inquiry has never happened before,” she said. “We don’t have a template we can follow so we’re moving forward with a few principles that we really want to make sure are held in the forefront. That is, do no further harm, we want to have a trauma informed approach to how we engage with families.”For his part, Harvey eventually made contact with a liaison officer for the inquiry, which helped cleared up the misunderstanding.He hopes that soon it will be easier for others to be included right from the get go.“I’m more worried at the same time about my aunt’s sons, are they getting that information?,” he wonders,” he said.Aside from the newsletter, the national inquiry into MMIWG said it will also begin a community radio campaign targeting more remote communities, but that for the time being the best way to stay up to date is to still follow them on social media. They expect to begin public meetings sometime in May.Tfennario@aptn.calast_img read more

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