Bulldogs Grapplers Participate At SD Sectionals

first_imgHere are the results for the BHS wrestling team after participating in the Sectionals – thank you for posting.The Batesville High School wrestling team traveled to South Dearborn to participate in the 2015 wrestling Sectionals. There were nine teams competing for the Sectional title but only two teams were in the running. Each round the South Dearborn Knights and the Franklin County Wildcats went back and forth leading the way. It came down to the final match of the day before the 2015 Champions could be announced which went to South Dearborn by ½ point over Franklin County. The bulldogs came away in 8th place with one Sectional Champ (Will Amberger – 195 lb. class), three 3rd place finishers (Jackson Wooldridge – 120 lb. class, John Moody – 126 lb. class, Neal Nobbe – 160 lb. class), and one fifth place finisher (Hunter Fetters – 106 lb. class)Senior captain Will Amberger had perfect day with three victories earning Batesville’s only Sectional Champion. Amberger’s first match was against Hunter Nichols of Rushville where he earned a decisive victory after pinning his opponent after just 27 seconds on the mat. Dario Guintini of East Central was Amberger’s next opponent where he fell short losing 3-6 to Amberger. This win moved Amberger to the Sectional finals against a talented Jake Cavins of Milan. Amberger controlled the entire match earning three takedowns and two escapes giving him the victory by a 8-3 decision and a second Sectional title for his career.Senior Captain Neal Nobbe fell short to the 160 lb. runner-up Brandon manning of South Dearborn but earned three victories by pin on the day giving him a 3rd place finish. These three pins helped Nobbe tie the BHS single season pin record which is a great accomplishment for this year. Junior John Moody fell short to the Sectional Champ Johnny Loos of Franklin County but earned three victories by pin on the day giving him a 3rd place finish. Freshman Jackson Wooldridge fell short to the runner-up Jacob Lane of South Dearborn but earned three victories by pin on the day giving him a 3rd place finish.Sophomore Hunter Fetters went 2-2 on the day earning a 5th place finish. Laiken Hanna, Nick Schneider, and Chris Schene, all wrestled well but fell short to some tough competitors.All wrestlers finishing in 1st- 4th places will be advancing to the Regionals next weekend at Richmond.Team Scores were:  1st South Dearborn – 228 points; 2nd Franklin County – 227.5 points; 3rd Lawrenceburg – 144 points; 4th Milan – 133 points; 5th Union County – 117 points; 6th East Central – 110 points; 7th Rushville – 100 points; 8th Batesville – 91 points; and 9th Connersville – 67 points.Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Chris Deal.last_img read more

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EA gets wrecked over lootboxes at UK government meeting

first_imgBuy TodayYesterday7 days ago30 days ago US$50.94 $50.94 FIFA 20 Standard Edition – PlayStation 4center_img $50.94 $50.94 EA and Epic Games tried to defend lootboxes, microtransactions, and their billion-dollar engagement practices to a recent UK government committee. They failed quite badly.   Key EA and Epic Games representatives recently attended a meeting discussing video game addiction with the UK’s Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee. The results are quite embarrassing for the titans of industry. Both EA and Epic reps floundered in their responses, and looked quite nervous. The companies tried re-defining lootboxes as “surprise mechanics” like a Hatchimal or Kinder Egg, and declined giving key information like user metrics and average revenues earned per user. “Do you consider lootboxes to be an ethical feature of your games?” Scottish MP Brendan O’Hara asked EA’s representative, Kerry Hopkins. In a move to shrug responsibility and shift the definition of the term, Kerry says EA likens lootboxes in its games to the cheap throwaway blind bag toys sold in stores. They’re just “surprise mechanics” and people actually love surprises, EA legal exec Kerry Hopkins says. “So first, we don’t call them lootboxes. So we refer to them as surprise mechanics. I think it’s important to look at…if you go to a store that sells a lot of toys, and you do a search for surprise toys, this is something that people enjoy. They enjoy surprises. It’s something that’s been part of toys for years, whether it’s Kinder Eggs or Hatchimals, or LOL Surprise.  “We do think the way we have implemented these kinds of mechanics in FIFA Ultimate Team is quite ethical, and quite fun. It’s enjoyable to people.”  “We agree with the UK Gambling Commission, the Australia Gambling Commission, and many other gambling commissions that [surprise mechanics] aren’t gambling. We also disagree that there’s evidence that it leads to gambling.  “Instead we think it’s like many other products people enjoy in a very healthy way, for people who like the element of surprise.”  “Just to be clear…your lootboxes are just surprise mechanics. You have no ethical qualms whatsoever about them?” O’Hara asks. “So I think you’re re-characterizing my language. What I said is that the way we’ve implemented our Ultimate Team packs is ethical,” Kerry responds, saying that all of EA’s games deliver randomized mechanics in an ethical and fun manner. For all of the games on the market that have a randomized content mechanic, a surprise mechanic, a lootbox, I have no qualms they are implemented in an ethical way.”  EA makes billions every year from its intense focus on engagement monetization. It’s biggest games are typically elongated via grindy, online-based gameplay mechanics that push gamers to spend money to save time–or for the chance to save time. Engagement is achieved by creating expansive gameplay loops that sees players repeating certain activities for the chance in earning valuable loot. As they play longer and become part of the core usergroup, they’re incentivized to buy optional content like costumes and skins to show off their characters.  It’s a tactic with lots of psychology involved, and all of gaming’s biggest players are doing it. EA has been forced to shift towards cosmetic-only monetization in its games to avoid lootbox controversy (Battlefront II’s huge controversy did lots of damage, and we even originally predicted it’d have lootboxes back in 2017). Now EA could be forced to either remove lootboxes, significantly alter its business structure, or both. At least in the UK. These panels aren’t a trial, but everything these reps have said are cataloged and documented and will likely go lengths in decided how the UK handles its gaming laws. As for Epic Games…well…they didn’t inspire any confidence either. Epic Games made an estimated $3 billion in profit in 2018 thanks to Fortnite, and it’s cosmetic monetization scheme coupled with extremely addictive gameplay has caused lots of scrutiny. When asked if Epic Games had any sort of tools or measure to counter-act possible addiction, company rep Canon Pence said no. Of course Epic wants users playing for as long as possible, and kind of time-lock mechanic would impede on that golden goose egg of engagement. “We don’t have a mechanism in place that automatically sets limits on that. I don’t think it’s our responsibility to determine how much players should play Fortnite,” said Epic Games general counsel Canon Pence. Epic was then grilled about having no age gates in Fortnite, and asked outright if they feel they have no responsibility to regulate or even collect data on players’ ages. Epic of course said no, that the end-user responsibility is in platform holder’s hands like Sony, Microsoft, and Nintendo. And of course they don’t collect any data to determine a player’s age. I’m honestly embarrassed for these big companies. I expected a heated battle where EA and Epic tried a bit harder than this to defend their prized billion-dollar earners. It’s almost as if they know there’s gigantic problems with the live service industry, and that games with looboxes can be quite predatory, invasive, and psychologically addictive. last_img read more

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