Kelli O’Hara & Christian Borle Know You Want Something to Go Wrong During Peter Pan Live!

first_img Whatever happens, O’Hara says she’ll love it. “We come from that world of the show will go on and we’ll make it work. It’ll be fun,” she says.  View Comments O’Hara quickly interjects, “Little things! Nothing big! These people know what they’re doing.” “I think people want to see a couple of little things go wrong to see what happens,” Borle adds. Peter Pan Live!, starring Allison Williams and Christopher Walken, airs on December 4 at 8PM EST.center_img “I am a live theater person,” says five-time Tony nominee O’Hara, who plays Mrs. Darling. “There is no contingency plan; you will see anything that happens. You will go through it with us.” Tony winner Christian Borle, who plays both Smee and Mr. Darling notes that the biggest question marks in the show are the dog playing Nana and the children. “There’s no live audience, so there’s no audience to react and throw [the dog] off. We’re going to be in an enclosed space, and he’ll know the drill. It’s going to feel for him—unless he feels our nervous energy—just like any other day. And then the children,” he laughs. “Well, that’s a whole other thing. Are the Broadway vets in NBC’s live broadcast of Peter Pan Live! nervous something will go wrong during the performance? There is a lot at stake: last year the network’s telecast of The Sound of Music drew 22 million viewers, while the 1955 live Peter Pan broadcast garnered a whopping 65 million viewers. Nevertheless, Broadway alums Kelli O’Hara and Christian Borle are cool and confident about the possibility of an on-air mishap.last_img read more

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Cashiers-Highlands Plateau

first_imgLand of Waterfalls: A hiker gazes at 40-foot Dry Falls, near Highlands, N.C. Photo: Ashley WoodringThe Cashiers-Highlands plateau of Western North Carolina is an off-the-beaten-path oasis of incredible beauty. A long-time destination for the Greenville, Asheville, and Atlanta retirement communities, the area also draws outdoor athletes of all ages. Often referred to as the “Land of Waterfalls,” the area boasts abundant rainfall and unique geology, which creates some of the most spectacular cascades in the South. No matter what your outdoors passion, this area has something to fit the bill. Here are a few of our favorite getaways.Whiteside MountainHiking and ClimbingWhiteside is a marquee feature among the stacked list of natural scenic attractions in the area. Its massive North Face is impossible to miss by anyone making the drive on 64 between Cashiers and Highlands. While this mountain hosts some of the most challenging and committing trad and sport climbing routes in the South, it also has beautiful hiking options available to hikers of all skill levels.HikingThere are several options available to hikers wanting to access the top of the granite escarpment that reaches 4,930 feet of elevation.  The most popular is a two-mile loop that utilizes an old roadbed to wind up, and a steeper trail on the way back down to treat visitors to one spectacular view after another.  From these vantage points, hikers can gaze into the piedmont of South Carolina and Georgia and view peregrine falcons nesting in the cliffs. These are actually the fastest animals on earth, capable of diving for their prey at speeds of 200 miles per hour. Another option is to visit the Devil’s Courthouse, where you will be treated to 360-degree views, and the loop will be extended to four miles. Access to Whiteside can be obtained in Wildcat Cliffs Country Club for a $2 fee.ClimbingWhile the hiking on Whiteside Mountain caters to people of all fitness and ability levels, the climbing is not for the faint of heart.  Whiteside is known as some of the most challenging and dangerous climbing in the South. The routes have a runout character, and some have 10 or more pitches, so bring your game face, and go with climbers who have prior experience out there.The North Face is the most visible, but the majority of climbing occurs on the South Face.  This is a plus for year-round climbing, since the sun keeps you warmer in the winter.  The most popular route, Original Route, is a 5.11a, or a 5.9a if you use the bolt ladder at the crux.  Be wary of the first pitch, which is comprised of 140 feet of 5.7 with no protection.Additional options include the three-pitch ice climbing routes available on the North Face, and a number of 5.11 routes up to Devil’s Courthouse.One other consideration is the falcon nesting grounds. Parts of the mountain will sporadically close to climbers as the birds move around; check CarolinaClimbers.org to stay updated.Cullasaja RiverWaterfall TourThe Cullasaja originates near the town of Highlands, and is one of the epicenters for recreation in the area. The river offers excellent options for waterfall viewing, trout fishing, swimming, and picnicking. One popular pastime is the waterfall tour starting from Highlands and consisting of Bridal Veil Falls, Quarry Falls, Dry Falls, and Cullasaja Falls.Bridal Veil is located on the way from Highlands to the Cullasaja on Highway 64. This waterfall is a classic because it is possible to drive your car underneath the drop for a photo op. Visit in the wintertime for impressive icicle displays. Quarry Falls is the classic Cullasaja destination for picnics and swimming.  The multi-tiered 20-foot drop is usually bathed in sunlight, and if you are lucky, you may catch a view of kayakers descending the drop as they paddle this class IV section of river.Continuing on, Dry Falls is a special one because of its ease of access, and the very intimate way in which you can experience it.  While it is possible to view the waterfall from the top and side, you can also walk behind the curtain and soak in the feeling of an entire river cascading 75 feet over your head. More great views are available on the other side after passing underneath the falls.Cullasaja Falls is the largest waterfall on the river, but is logistically more challenging.  It is best to approach this one from the Franklin side, and there are a couple of primitive parking spaces on the side of the road. Once there, you will be treated to views of a multi-tiered, 250-foot cascade. The road here is almost a destination unto itself as it carves through the steep gorge.Panthertown ValleyHiking and CampingPanthertown is a picturesque valley flanked by granite domes and sheer slopes, and is dubbed by locals as the “Yosemite of the East.” This area, which is the headwaters of the Tuckaseegee River, is a true adventurer’s destination. The trails are not marked, and it’s easy to get lost in the 30-mile network. Hiking and biking abound amid the myriad falls and overlooks of the area, and primitive camping is also allowed within the 6,700 acres of protected land. Rare ferns, mosses, and liverworts are part of the mountain bog ecosystems, and you may be lucky enough to see one of the protected members of this bear sanctuary.Enter for your chance to win a fishing and riding Mountain Weekend Getaway to the Cashiers/Sapphire Valley!last_img read more

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Straight Up Softcore

first_imgI recently discovered that I’m not hardcore anymore. Okay, I was never hardcore in a “talented” or “brave” sort of way, but my general enthusiasm for most adventure sports made up for any lack of skill. If there’s an opportunity to ski or surf or bike or…whatever…I’m the kind of guy that’s gonna take it. At least, that’s what I thought, until this past weekend.My wife and I were in Charleston for a few days hitting up the High Water Festival, and there was a brief, two-hour window where we could hit Folly Beach, outside of town, so I brought the surf board. Folly has a couple of the best surf breaks in South Carolina, and I rarely get to surf anymore so I was excited at the prospect. But when we got to the beach, it was a little breezy. And the water looked downright cold. The waves didn’t look great, but that’s never stopped me before. That’s one of the true joys of being mediocre at something—you don’t have to have perfect conditions to enjoy yourself. I’ve spent hours surfing choppy, mushy beach breaks off the coast of South Carolina, paddling desperately to catch a four-second ride, and grinning the whole time.But this time, my enthusiasm wasn’t there. Instead of surfing, I sat on the beach and drank beer with my wife for two hours. As far as afternoons go, it was pretty awesome, but it definitely wasn’t hardcore. It was straight up “softcore.”On the upside, I took the opportunity to discover a new beer, Washout Wheat, from Holy City, which is ironically named for the surf break I decided not to tackle that day. Fittingly, Washout Wheat is not a hard core beer. It’s a light, easy-drinking (5.1% ABV) wheat beer made specifically for sitting in the sand and watching other people shred the gnar. It’s soft around the edges thanks to all the wheat, and has just the faintest hint of banana from the yeast. It’s straight up softcore. Just like me.Look at the guy on the can. Soft in the middle, a big-brimmed hat because he’s worried about the sun, a shaggy beard…that may as well be a picture of me sitting on the beach, watching other people do their thing.Sigh.last_img read more

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Supreme Court Historical Society to gather in Boca

first_img May 15, 2002 Regular News Supreme Court Historical Society to gather in Boca Supreme Court Historical Society to gather in Bocacenter_img The 20th annual meeting of the Florida Supreme Court Historical Society is scheduled for May 20 in Boca Raton in conjunction with The Florida Bar Annual Meeting. The historical society meeting will take place at the Boca Raton Resort & Club, in Estate Ballroom 1, at 10 a.m.Among the items on the meeting agenda is a vote on two revisions to the organization’s articles of incorporation proposed by society trustees. A recommended revision to Article V.1 would allow the society to have one or more vice presidents (rather than a single vice president), and a proposed change to Article X would make the language gender-neutral.Tallahassee lawyers W. Dexter Douglass, the Historical Society’s president, will review the organization’s accomplishments during the past year, as well as anticipated future activities.All members and prospective members are encouraged to attend.In addition, the Historical Society will have an exhibit table at the Bar’s Annual Meeting detailing the group’s programs and its plans for preserving Florida’s judicial history and educating the public.last_img read more

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Second Circuit Board Candidates Platform Statements

first_img March 1, 2005 Regular News Below are platform statements for candidates for the special election for Second Circuit, Seat 2, on The Florida Bar Board of Governors.Filing for the contest closed February 15, and the winner will be sworn in at the June Annual Meeting to finish the last year in the term of board member Michael Glazer, who is resigning from the board.Ballots will be mailed around March 1 (along with ballots for the seven regular 2005 board races), and must be returned to the Bar’s election company no later than midnight, March 21. As explained in the ballot, members have the option of casting a paper ballot, or voting online.If there is a runoff, those ballots will be mailed around April 1, and must be returned by midnight April 21.March 15 is the deadline for filing for the 17th Circuit, Seat 3, special election to replace board member Henry Latimer, who was killed in a car accident January 24. If contested, ballots for that race will be mailed around April 1 and must be returned no later than midnight April 21, and platform statements will be in the April 1 Bar News. Dominic M. Caparello Thank you for the opportunity to represent you and the Second Judicial Circuit on The Florida Bar Board of Governors. I believe my background and experience as a civil trial attorney, with prior leadership positions within the local and state bar associations, will allow me to be an effective voice for you within the Bar.My prior experience in Bar matters has convinced me that effective representation requires not only listening and articulating your positions, but also that your representative be able to translate your views into concrete and affirmative action with results. As a past president of the Tallahassee Bar Association, chair of the Bar’s Trial Lawyers Section, member of this circuit’s judicial nominating commission, and chair of the Bar’s Judicial Nominating Committee, I have been actively involved in reaching consensus and obtaining results for you on many issues that have had meaningful impact on our practices.Our circuit is fortunate in that it includes a significant number of governmental attorneys. Given the unique employment constraints government lawyers face, some issues will affect them differently. However, regardless of whether your practice is in the private or the public sector, most Bar issues affect us equally. All of us must continue to fend off the almost yearly legislative attempts to regulate attorneys and erode the independence of our courts. To this end, proper court staffing and funding is critical. New judgeships will be requested by the Supreme Court. We need to safeguard the process that allows judges to be selected on the basis of ability, intellect, and temperament, as free from politics as possible.Diversity, professionalism, and how attorneys are perceived by the public are crucial. As a past chair of the Bar’s Trial Lawyers Section, I have been able to diversify the section by increasing minority representation and adding different practice areas within the section’s executive council. I will continue my efforts to increase diversity in the Bar’s decision-making process.CLE, board certification, and professionalism requirements must be made as fair, cost effective, and as available as possible. I hope to be able to implement more creative ways in which all attorneys, government and private, can meet their Bar obligations without undue cost and time hardships. I also hope to make practice area specialization and re-certification more fair by offering alternative methods to maintaining certification.Advertising, public perception of attorneys, multidisciplinary, and multijurisdictional practice issues, as well as Article V funding and legislative or constitutional reforms, will continue to create challenges for all of us. I have had firsthand experience in dealing with these issues for you and I want to continue to protect your interests. I know I can do so effectively, and ask for your confidence and vote. I believe in a fair, united, and inclusive, rather than exclusive, Bar and I pledge to you my very best and sincerest efforts to represent all attorneys in our circuit. I hope I can count on your vote and ask that you please remember to send in your ballot in my support. Thank you.Charles E. “Chuck” Hobbs II Second Circuit Board Candidates Platform Statements Second Circuit Board Candidates Platform Statementscenter_img Contrary to popular opinion, the practice of law encompasses more than notoriety and pecuniary gain as our profession, more than most, is centered on public service. Toward this end it would be an honor for me to serve on the Board of Governors as a representative from the Second Judicial Circuit, Seat 2. I currently practice as an associate with the Knowles and Randolph law firm.In the 50 years since its founding The Florida Bar has strove to become an ethnically and gender diverse organization, but despite great gains, its governing body remains underrepresentative of the minority legal population. If elected, I would be fortunate to continue the work of my mother, Dr. Vivian L. Hobbs, a public member of the board from 2000-2004, and the late Judge Henry Lattimer, to name a few, in working to provide a voice for minorities and women.Further, I am interested in providing a voice for individuals who work in state government, small firms, or in solo practice. Following graduation from the University of Florida Levin College of Law, I served as an assistant state attorney for William N. Meggs. I have since been a trial lawyer, first as an associate with Frank E. Sheffield, P.A., and then as a sole practitioner. For four years, I served as a member of the conflict panel providing counsel to indigent clients in our circuit. These experiences gave me an understanding of the vicissitudes that define the practice of law for a significant number of attorneys in our circuit. I would advocate increased mentoring opportunities between new and seasoned lawyers similar to the American Inns of Court. Through mentorship, many of the problems that plague small firms and sole practitioners may be ameliorated.As attorneys, we are afforded a unique opportunity to shape cultural mores through advocacy and judicial fiat. One of the most important issues that our profession faces, however, is overcoming the negative attacks that have made “lawyer” synonymous with “greed.” Special interest groups have falsely accused lawyers of prosecuting frivolous lawsuits that drive doctors and businesses from our state. Further, over the past 10 years, the legislature has placed considerable restraints on our criminal court judges by implementing mandatory sentencing laws. Arguably, these changes are a direct result of public perception that our prosecutors and judges are soft on crime. As a governor, I would work to launch an expansive public relations campaign to inform the citizens of our state about our profession. highlighting the altruism that lawyers display through pro bono assistance and the countless hours spent by judges ensuring that the public has an opportunity to be heard, we can do more to define ourselves in the court of public opinion.If elected, I will work to combat the insidious campaigns that cast our profession as ignoble. These goals will be achieved by more diversity on the governing board, enhanced professionalism through mentorships, and the zealous advocacy of the complete autonomy of the judicial branch of government. Lynne Quimby-Pennock My name is Lynne Quimby-Pennock, and I am asking for your vote for the Second Judicial Circuit, Seat 2, representative to the Board of Governors of The Florida Bar.I have lived and practiced in the Second Circuit for over 20 years. We have a rich tradition of representation, and I intend to continue that tradition.Having served on one of the grievance committees for our circuit, I developed a keen sense of some issues facing our profession. Although discipline is a huge part of the Bar’s function, professionalism and education must also be at the forefront.I want to focus on education and professionalism. Not just our own continuing legal education requirements, but also the ongoing education of the public as to what we do, and how we can assist all persons. Professionalism is a key to our success, and unfortunately there appears to be a lack of it among our brethren. I became an attorney because I held a number of local lawyers in high regard. However, after achieving my goal, I have seen the professionalism I originally witnessed erode away. I believe that through education we can improve ourselves and our profession.My work experiences and community involvement have been extensive. I have practiced with several state agencies and currently work as an assistant general counsel for the Department of Health. I have been a member of the Florida Government Bar Association for a number of years and recently served as its president. Our local teen court is a unique opportunity to help youth in our community and I have enjoyed the numerous evenings spent serving as a judge for teen court. We are fortunate to live with a law school in our midst, and I also have enjoyed judging the various mock trials/moot court events it has sponsored. Additionally, I am a member of the Tallahassee Women Lawyers Association. My husband and I actively support the Children’s Home Society, the Alzheimer’s Project of Tallahassee, the FSU Boosters, and our children’s various school functions. I am a proud five-plus gallon blood donor, and I encourage each of you to donate blood as you can.I would welcome your thoughts and comments about issues that are important to you. You may contact me via e-mail at laqp@comcast.net. I will study the issues facing the board, attempt to get feedback from you, and try my best to communicate with all our members.Please vote for me, Lynne Quimby-Pennock, in the upcoming election for the Board of Governors, Seat 2. Thank you for your support in this challenging and exciting endeavor.last_img read more

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Will traditional payment methods disappear in the future?

first_imgA common counter argument to the move toward mobile payments is that credit cards are not broken, and that swiping or inserting a credit card works perfectly fine. And those people would be right. Credit cards are not going away anytime soon.  However, subtly and surely, the plastic cards we most closely associate with payments are disappearing. Heck, there is much written about that currency will be a thing of the past in the not so distant future.  Yes, we do carry less cash than we used to, but there still are times we need to have some “real” money in hand.Who remembers the recent ad campaigns for Amazon Echo, first airing during this year’s Super Bowl starring Dan Marino, Alec Baldwin, and Jason Schwartz? In the first of the series, they are at a party and Alec Baldwin explains to Missy Elliott about his Echo that he can ask questions, stream music, and order things. In the second of the series, “the day after” Alec Baldwin asks Alexa (Amazon’s cloud-based voice service, similar to Apple’s Siri) to purchase new Bresciani socks. No credit card is needed since Alexa has his payment credentials on file.At the very large Consumer Electronics Show (CES), Samsung showed off the new connected refrigerator. Among many other smart features, the fridge can manage your shopping list, and when you are ready, purchase groceries for delivery. Again, no card needs to be presented to the delivery guy, the payment was made by your fridge (or actually the tokenized wallet associated with your fridge account). continue reading » 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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These are the six things to weigh up before deciding to invest in property

first_imgThis investment property at 142/26 Felix St, Brisbane is rented until December for $550 a week. It is listed for sale for offers of more than $500,000. Picture: realestate.com.auINVESTING in property sounds so easy right? Find a property you want to buy, visit the bank, and find a tenant – done deal.Well it sounds easy, and it can be, as long as you work out a few crucial things at the beginning.According to ME head of home loans, Patrick Nolan, there are six key things potential investors need to weigh up before they even start looking.What’s your motivation?Nolan advises thinking carefully about this.“A quality property could be an excellent long term asset that can help you achieve important personal goals like building personal wealth or saving for retirement,” he said. “What are your goals, and will a rental property help you achieve them?’’Do you have a long term outlook?There are many costs involved in buying and selling an investment property aside from the weekly mortgage payment. These include stamp duty, legal fees and agent’s commission.All of this can add tens of thousands of dollars to your expenses and it can take time to recoup through capital growth.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home4 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor4 hours agoHow will you pay for major repairs?“This explains why property is regarded as a long term asset – one you should ideally be prepared to hold onto for five or more years,’’ Nolan said. “You don’t want to be in a position where a change in work or lifestyle means you have to sell the place prematurely and potentially cut short any profits on sale.’’Are you comfortable taking on an investment loan?While investment loans often come with higher interest at least it can be claimed on tax. Even so be sure to take into account future interest rate rises which you may need to kick in for.What if the tenant leaves?“Most rental properties experience periods of vacancy from time to time. Be sure your budget can handle these no-rent periods – no matter how brief.’’Paying for maintenance and repairs?Do you have enough cash on hand to pay for when things go wrong? “It’s worth having a slush fund of cash to cover these expenses – or at least a back-up source of funds that you can draw on in an emergency.’’Don’t be blindsided by tax perksNegative gearing and other tax concessions and deductions sound great, but don’t let his be the only reason you are investing.“Any tax benefits should be the icing on the cake – not the number one driver for becoming a property investor,’’ Nolan said.last_img read more

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Expanded Panama Canal Tops Expectations in First Year

first_imgOn its way to further position Panama as the logistics hub of the Americas, the Expanded Panama Canal has set a number of records and surpassed expectations in its first year of operations, resulting in redrawn global trade routes.Over the past 12 months from its inauguration date of June 26, the Expanded Canal’s performance “has exceeded nearly all expectations.”During the period, more than 1,500 Neopanamax vessels transited the new locks, according to the Panama Canal Authority (ACP).Containerships represent some 46.8 percent of traffic through the waterway, followed by liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) carriers and liquefied natural gas (LNG) carriers, which represent around 34.2 and 9.4 percent, respectively. Other segments such as bulk carriers, tankers, car carriers, and passenger vessels have also transited the new locks.Additionally, Panama Canal’s tonnage has increased by 22.2 percent when comparing the 2016 and 2017 fiscal year. On average, 5.9 vessels transit the Expanded Canal per day, surpassing original forecasts of two to three daily transits for the first year of operation.Fifteen new liner services opted to transit the Expanded Locks, “as shipping lines continue to reroute their services to take advantage of the economies of scale offered by the Expanded Canal.”The one-year anniversary of the canal’s inauguration, one of the most significant milestones in the history of the 102-year old waterway and a defining moment for the people of Panama and the broader maritime industry, will be commemorated on June 26, 2017.All vessels transiting on Monday will receive a commemorative first anniversary plaque, the ACP informed.last_img read more

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Castle Comfort man denied bail for threatening wife

first_img Share LocalNews Castle Comfort man denied bail for threatening wife by: – June 26, 2012 Share Share court gavel Adler Phillip of Castle Comfort was on Tuesday, remanded at the state prison after being denied bail by magistrate Candia Carette George, for breaching two protection orders.Phillip allegedly disregarded the protection order dated April 19th, 2012 and threatened his estranged wife by spitting in her face and threatening her.On June 23rd, 2012 at Newtown, having had notice of the protection Phillip allegedly assaulted his wife by spitting in her face.Then on June 24th, 2012 Phillip allegedly threatened his wife by saying; “my love of my life, you think you letting me go prison. You make police come at my home again. A shoot out will take place before I go back to prison”.Phillip pleaded “not guilty” to both charges.He informed the court that he had spoken to his wife on Monday night and she had agreed to work things out.However when the wife was called to the stand, she informed the magistrate that she had “nothing” to say to the court.Phillip could be seen with an expression of “shock” on his face as he mouthed to his wife “you doh have nothing to say, you doh say you want to work things out?”Police prosecutor Claude Weekes objected to bail on the grounds that at the time of the incident, the defendant was on bail for a capital offence, and was already granted bail previously for an offence of similar nature.Weekes said “having breached the protection order, the threats had been done persistently in the presence of the police and therefore bail ought not to be considered”.In his client’s defense Kondwani Williams said it was an “unfortunate incident and his client may have overreacted and this was an issue of the heart”.Magistrate Carette-George informed Williams that “crimes of passion” are the most “violent” at times, and that the words used by his client were “very serious”, before she denied bail to allow Phillip some time to “cool off”.However Phillip could be granted bail as early as Wednesday since his wife informed the court through a lawyer that she was scared and “didn’t want to say anything” in public.The matter is set for hearing on October 28th, 2012.Dominica Vibes Newscenter_img Tweet Sharing is caring! 131 Views   9 commentslast_img read more

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Scheduling Dilemna

first_imgBall State is one of many smaller Division I basketball teams trying to upgrade their schedules at home.  Larger schools will schedule them, but they demand they play at their school every year or at least 2 out of 3 years.According to an article in the Indianapolis Star, Ball State signed a 3-year contract with Utah and played the Utes on their floor the first 2 years.  When it came time for Utah to go to Muncie to play, they opted to buy off the contract.  Most larger schools that Ball State tries to schedule simply refuse to even consider playing on the Cardinals home floor.  How are schools like those in the MAC going to upgrade their schedules without playing all of their games away?This is not just a Ball State problem.  It is all teams not in the Super 5 Conferences.  The only solution seems to be an edict handed down from the NCAA, and this is likely to never happen because it is all about money.last_img read more

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