Ireland v England and France – kick off times confirmed

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Declan Kidney has some tough decisions to makeThe IRFU have today confirmed the kick off times for the Guinness Summer Series games against France and England in Aviva Stadium in August.Ireland will play four games in August starting with a trip to Murrayfield to play Scotland on August 6th. This is followed by a trip to Bordeaux to play France on August 13th.The Guinness Summer Series then kicks off on Saturday, August 20th when Ireland play France with the game kicking off at 5pm. The following week sees the final game of the series against England kick off at 2.30pm in Aviva Stadium.Ticket prices for the Guinness Summer Series range from €10.00 for schoolboy/schoolgirl tickets up to €50.00 for Premium Level seats. There is fantastic value available for families with tickets available for two adults and two children for just €60.00.Tickets will be distributed through the four provincial branches to affiliated clubs and schools. Thereafter any remaining tickets will be sold online through the Irish Rugby Supporters Club on www.irishrugby.ie  later in the year.Guinness Summer Series: Home game ticket pricesPremium: €50Category 1: €40Category 2: €30Category 3: Family Ticket €60 (adult €20, child €10 based on two adults and two children)Category 4: €20Schoolboy/girl: €10Scotland v IrelandMurrayfield Stadium, Edinburgh CARDIFF, WALES – MARCH 11: Ireland coach Declan Kidney watches his players warm up during training today ahead of tomorrows RBS Six Nations game against Wales at Millennium Stadium on March 11, 2011 in Cardiff, Wales. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images) Saturday 27th August,K.O. 14.30 Saturday 6th AugustK.O. TBCFrance v IrelandBordeauxSaturday 13th AugustK.O. 20.30 (local time)Ireland v FranceAviva StadiumSaturday 20th AugustK.O. 17.00Ireland v EnglandAviva Stadiumlast_img read more

See More

Saints sign US Eagles forward Samu Manoa

first_img Jim Mallinder – Northampton Saints Director of RugbyNorthampton Saints today announced the signing of US Eagles forward Samu Manoa ahead of the 2011/12 season.Twenty-six-year-old Manoa stands at 6 feet 6 inches and weighs in at 122kgs. He has one international cap to his name, won against Georgia last November, but has played for the Eagles in a number of non-cap matches, including against Saracens in September 2010.He comes from Concord, California, and plays for San Francisco Golden Gate RFC, winning the National Super League Championships. NORTHAMPTON, ENGLAND – APRIL 07: Jim Mallinder, the Northampton director of rugby looks on during the Northampton Saints training session held at Franklin’s Gardens on April 7, 2011 in Northampton, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) Manoa, who can also play lock and in the back row, has also played club rugby in New Zealand and last October scored the winning try for the Eagles in their win over Tonga ‘A’, his ancestral home, and followed that up with a score against Argentina Jaguars five days later.Director of rugby Jim Mallinder says that while not many people may have heard of Manoa at the moment he had the potential to impress next season. “We have been impressed by what we have seen of Samu,” he said. “He is physical, has good ball skills and an outstanding turn of pace for a big man. He is also eager to make the most of his opportunity in England and wants to succeed in the Premiership. We’re looking forward to seeing what he can do in the Saints environment.”center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

See More

World Cup travel ideas

first_imgGive it some Welly: There’s plenty to see and do in Wellington, where eight RWC games are being playedBy Herb ChristophersIF YOU’RE heading to New Zealand this autumn for the World Cup, we have plenty of ideas for how you can keep busy and see the countryside in between all the rugby matches.Whether your team has lost a game and you want cheering up or you need to clear your head after celebrating a resounding victory, there is a natural place that can put life back into perspective, past the try-line and out in the wilderness. Well, maybe just off the beaten track.We’ve put together a list of attractions close to the rugby venues to help you get close to nature in New Zealand, so click on the links below to get some travel ideas in the places you’re going. We’ve gone North to South…WhangareiNorth ShoreAuckland DunedinInvercargill RotoruaHamiltonNew PlymouthNapierWellingtonNelsoncenter_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

See More

In the spotlight – Owen Farrell

first_imgFor Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit “When you’re kicking you have to be like that – to be focused on the job,” he says. “Most people get nervous before matches but once you get out there you just have to focus on what you’ve got to do. It’s a mixture of being composed and knowing your job while at the same time being competitive. It’s something the team does really well.“We’re a very aggressive team, but we know our jobs and work hard for each other at the same time. I like to get stuck in and playing at ten it’s about getting the balance right between doing that and stepping back and doing what the team needs. I love everything about rugby – it’s all I’ve ever known. I’ve always played rugby, be it league when I was younger or union now. It’s a brilliant game to play and I enjoy every minute.”He could be enjoying life on the international stage soon too. He may want to play down his England chances, but his feats on the field are doing anything but. It’s now a question of when, not if, he wins his first cap for England.This article appeared in the January 2012 issue of Rugby World Magazine. Would you like to sign up to Rugby World’s excellent weekly email newsletter? Click here. Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Owen For Colleen Farrell there is such a thing as too much rugby. She obviously knew what she was letting herself in for when she married Andy Farrell, the former Great Britain rugby league star and eight-time England centre in the union code. But with son Owen now the bright young thing of English rugby, talk of the oval ball can become tiresome.“I still live at home so I talk to my dad a lot,” says Owen Farrell, 20. “We watch every game on TV, too, and my mum gets fed up with us constantly talking about rugby. She always comes to watch us play and loves it, but at times she wants to talk about something else.”Unfortunately for Colleen, family conversations look likely to be dominated by rugby for some time to come as Owen’s career continues to move to higher levels. When injuries saw a teenage Farrell parachuted into the Saracens No 10 shirt last year, little was expected, but he took to top-flight rugby like Pat Sharp to Bushtucker Trials in I’m A Celebrity… The goalkicking responsibility didn’t phase him and he excelled throughout the season, his boot providing 17 points in the 22-18 Aviva Premiership final win over Leicester.He has continued in much the same vein this season, even if he’s more often playing in the centre, with new signing Charlie Hodgson lining up at fly-half. Farrell insists that he doesn’t mind where he plays and is just enjoying the chance to learn from his more experienced team-mates.“I got an opportunity last season because of injury and I had to learn quickly,” he says. “Having great players around you and good coaches helps you through it. Wherever I fit in to contribute to the team, I’m concentrating on playing well. I’m still learning and looking at what I need to improve and work on. I learn from playing in the Premiership and I learn off the players around me too.“It’s great being involved in this team and playing with these players. I talk to players at the club like Charlie Hodgson, Brad Barritt and Neil de Kock about rugby all the time. It’s great to play inside and outside players like that. Charlie’s a fantastic player and he’s got a wealth of experience, so to tap into that is brilliant for me.”Farrell is a confident person and has no qualms about asking for advice, saying: “I’ve always been interested in asking questions.” He’s not quite so keen on answering questions about his prospective rise into the England team. The clamour for him to be included in his country’s RBS 6 Nations squad has been growing in recent months but the man himself won’t be drawn on the topic.Proud moment: Owen Farrell with dad Andy at Twickenham“I’m just going to try to keep getting better as a player and do my best to contribute to this Saracens team,” says Farrell. “I’m just going to focus on the match ahead and contributing to that. I’m going to keep working hard, keep improving as a player and playing for Saracens, and if anything comes from that it will be a bonus.“I’m the kind of person who likes to live in the now. I try to be the best I can be today and tomorrow I’ll be the best I can be then.”The best he is right now, with his combination of accurate goalkicking, fluid passing, strong running and hard tackling, is good enough to play for England. So while he is doing his upmost to avoid the hype, he seems destined to follow in his father’s footsteps sooner rather than later – and should, in fact, enjoy more success in the union code. Dad Andy made his rugby league debut for Great Britain aged 18 and was the youngest-ever captain of the side three years later, but he didn’t have the same flourishing career when he crossed codes as a player, though he has impressed as a coach for Saracens.If Farrell junior, who insists it’s not a problem working with his dad every day as it’s all he’s ever known in a professional rugby environment, does make the step up to Test level this season, he’s sure to approach it in the same cool and collected manner with which he deals with crucial kicks at goal. He often looks like the calmest person in the stadium as he lines up a penalty and it’s that mentality that has impressed so many observers.last_img read more

See More

Australia 25 Wales 23: The Verdict

first_img Space invader: Berrick Barnes breaks clear of Wales’ defence to set up Rob Horne for a first-half tryBy Sarah Mockford, Rugby World Features EditorIn a nutshellWales were denied a famous victory with the final kick of the game – Australia’s replacement fly-half Mike Harris nailing a late penalty from out wide to give the Wallabies the win and the series. It was a ferocious Test match, with Wales producing a huge defensive performance. They even outscored Australia two tries to one – George North going over early on and Jonathan Davies capitalising on Ashley Beck’s quick reactions to score at the start of the second half. The lead changed hands an incredible nine times, with both Leigh Halfpenny and Berrick Barnes accurate with their kicks, but it was Harris’s boot that had the final say.Aussie sinner: Cooper Vuna has been cited for this tackle on Leigh HalfpennyKey momentIn the last minute of the game Wales had possession, but Rhys Priestland kicked the ball deep to the Wallabies, who subsequently won a penalty at the breakdown. That set up a lineout on the ten-metre line and when Wales were pinged for collapsing the ensuing driving maul, Harris stepped up to seal the win. Wales should have had faith in their ability to keep ball in hand rather than kicking to the opposition.Star manBerrick Barnes may have arrived back in Melbourne just a couple of hours before kick-off after flying to Sydney overnight for the birth of his first son, but he showed no signs of tiredness at the Etihad Stadium. He dictated the Wallabies play by varying his game with a myriad of kicks and some effortlessly pinpoint passes – he set up Rob Horne for the Aussies’ only try – plus he missed just one shot at goal. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS NOT FOR FEATURED Room for improvementWales must improve their lineout – it too often went awry in Melbourne and cost them valuable possession. Quality first-phase ball in Australian terrirtory is what Wales need to launch their attacking game.Australia have set-piece problems of their own – they were regularly penalised at the scrum for early engagement and they will want to get their timing right in that area.Wales improved at the breakdown and were able to slow down Australian ball more regularly, so the Wallabies will be looking to counter that in Sydney next Saturday while Wales will want to have the same effect at the contact area.center_img Most important for Wales, however, is their composure and decision-making in match-winning situations. They were 40 seconds away from winning this match when they kicked the ball away – had they kept it in hand they could have been celebrating a memorable win. Instead, it was another case of so close yet so far.Golden moment: Mike Harris celebrates his match-winning kickIn quotes – winnersMike Harris: “As a kicker it’s your dream to be able to win a game. I was unsuccessful in my last Test against Scotland, so it felt good to be able to put it over. It was nice to have the roof closed so there weren’t hurricane conditions!”In quotes – losersSam Warburton: “The plan was to keep the ball so when we kicked it I remember Ryan Jones shouting, ‘No’ because that’s not what the forwards wanted. I thought we’d learned the lessons of that against Barbarians last summer, but the message wasn’t clear enough.”AUSTRALIA: Adam Ashley-Cooper; Cooper Vuna (Anthony Fainga’a 71), Rob Horne, Pat McCabe, Digby Ioane; Berrick Barnes (Mike Harris 73), Will Genia; Benn Robinson (Ben Alexander 65), Tatafu Polata Nau (Stephen Moore 51), Sekope Kepu, Rob Simmons (Michael Hooper 70), Nathan Sharpe, Scott Higginbotham, David Pocock (captain), Wycliff Palu (Dave Dennis 55).Try: Horne. Con: Barnes. Pens: Barnes 5, Harris.Sin-bin: Cooper Vuna (61min).WALES: Leigh Halfpenny; Alex Cuthbert, Jonathan Davies, Ashley Beck, George North; Rhys Priestland, Mike Phillips (Rhys Webb 65); Gethin Jenkins, Matthew Rees (Richard Hibbard 67), Adam Jones, Bradley Davies, Alun Wyn Jones (Luke Charteris 67), Dan Lydiate, Sam Warburton (captain), Ryan Jones. Tries: North, J Davies. Cons: Halfpenny 2. Pens: Halfpenny 3.last_img read more

See More

Wales 19-26 Samoa: The Verdict

first_imgTries: Autagavaia, G Pisi, Leota. Con: T Pisi. Pens: T Pisi 3.Referee: Pascal Gauzere (France). In quotes – losersWales coach Rob Howley: “We ran hard on occasions but we weren’t smart enough. If you don’t take your chances you lose games and we weren’t good enough.”Top statsSamoa made ten offloads to Wales’ four while the hosts’ conceded 16 turnovers to Wales 11.Match highlightsWALES: Leigh Halfpenny; Alex Cuthbert, Ashley Beck, Jamie Roberts, George North; Dan Biggar (Rhys Priestland 38), Mike Phillips; Paul James (Gethin Jenkins 62), Richard Hibbard (Ken Owens 18), Aaron Jarvis (Scott Andrews 77), Bradley Davies, Ian Evans (Luke Charteris h-t), Ryan Jones (capt, Sam Warburton 71), Justin Tipuric, Toby Faletau..Try: Beck. Con: Halfpenny. Pens: Halfpenny 4.SAMOA: Fa’atoina Autagavaia; Paul Perez, George Pisi, Paul Williams (Johnny Leota 56-69, 75), David Lemi (capt); Tusiata Pisi (Jeremy Su’a 78), Kahn Fotuali’i; Sakaria Taulafo, Wayne Ole Avei (Ti’i Paulo 58), Census Johnston (James Johnston 48), Daniel Leo, Teofilo Paulo (Joe Tekori 60), Ofisa Treviranus (Tivaini Foma’i 69), Maurie Fa’asavalu, Taiasina Tuifu’a. Flying in: George Pisi dives over in the corner to score a brilliant try for Samoa at the Millennium StadiumBy Sarah Mockford, Rugby World Features EditorIn a nutshellDEMOLITION DERBY. Those are the two words that spring to mind after this game. The hits were fearsome, the tackle contest was ferocious and Samoa so effectively shut Wales down that the hosts were unable to offer any significant threat in attack for the second week running. Samoa got off to a cracking start, Fa’atoina Autagavaia scoring a try inside two minutes, and wrapped the win up with two second-half tries – George Pisi with a great finish in the corner and Johnny Leota pouncing on a loose ball in the closing moments. Wales’ points came from an Ashley Beck intercept try and Leigh Halfpenny’s boot.General: Samoa No 9 Kahn Fotuali’iKey momentTaiasina Tuifu’a’s break in the opening minute set the tone for the whole match. He beat nearly a handful of Wales defenders to make it into the 22 and the ball was then spread wide for the opening try. Samoa had come to play and Wales were immediately on the back foot.Star manLeigh Halfpenny was superb – a rock under the high ball and accurate with the boot – while Jamie Roberts produced some of the biggest hits of the game, some feat when playing Samoa. But it was Kahn Fotuali’i who was the standout in this match. The Ospreys scrum-half bossed the game, ordering his forwards around the pitch and deciding when and where  to spread the ball wide. He was the general as Samoa condemned Wales to defeat.Room for improvementSamoa’s win has highlighted the need for the Pacific Islanders to have more regular top-level competition (a quick look at the players’ boots shows how professional they are these days!). Tier One nations – Australia and New Zealand in particular – must tour Samoa, Fiji and Tonga regularly and Super Rugby should look at introducing a franchise from the South Seas. Over to the IRB.Wales need to improve significantly if they are to even contain the All Blacks next week. They were caught out defensively after a couple of turnovers but their biggest worry should be the dearth of creativity. They simply don’t look like scoring tries and the Samoans shut down their ball-carriers with worrying ease.Oh – and the scrum. That disintegrated in the second half, Samoa winning a succession of penalties, so Wales need to do a lot of work on that this week.Finally, there were too many dangerous tackles that went unpunished in Cardiff. Using arms is a prerequisite in a tackle. If you don’t, you must be punished. It’s time for match officials to clamp down.Just kick it: Wales full-back Leigh HalfpennyIn quotes – winnersSamoa captain David Lemi: “This was an opportunity to help us make the top eight and have a good ranking for the World Cup draw. If you stop Wales’ go-forward men, you stop their game. Wales strength is their tight five and if you stop them going forwards and the backs get slow ball, they can’t play rugby.” TAGS: Northampton SaintsSamoa LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

See More

Building upper body strength: the bear crawl

first_imgWE’RE STARTING to work the upper body. John Dams, Harlequins’ head of strength and conditioning, has designed an upper body workout including some variations of the old classic, the bench press, in the September edition of Rugby World. Still want to work harder? Then try the bear crawl, as demonstrated below, which is a punishing test of your overall strength. Watch this video to see how it’s done! TAGS: Harlequins LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img

See More

Women’s Six Nations: Players to watch

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS In terms of bolters, though, the name that comes up is 17-year-old scrum-half Keira Bevan, who is competing with Amy Day for the No 9 jersey and is set to make her debut during the Six Nations. Taylor says: “She’s come through the sevens programme and has really developed. She’s a confident youngster – a typical scrum-half in character! She’s definitely got a big future.”Find out how England are juggling both their XVs and sevens goals in our exclusive interview with Sarah Hunter and Natasha Hunt in the March 2015 issue of Rugby World – on sale now. Click here to find out how to download the digital edition. Flanker Silvia Gaudino is well aware of what is at stake and she is quick to name Beatrice Rigoni, 19, as one to watch this season. Gaudino says: “She’s a very young player who started with the squad last year and I think she will do very well. She can play outside-half or centre, and has great vision and great defence skills.”SCOTLANDScotland conceded 261 points and scored just five in losing all of their 2014 Six Nations games, but improvements have been made in their off-field structures and they have played three warm-up games leading up to this year’s championship. “We’re the best prepared we’ve ever been for the Six Nations in terms of game time,” says captain Tracy Balmer, “and as a squad we’ll have more contact time during the Six Nations. We feel like we’re being taken more seriously now.”Fine nine: Mhairi Grieve made her Scotland debut against Italy last NovemberAs for the talent in the squad, Balmer pinpoints the scrum-halves. “Mhairi Grieve is a really exciting young player and it’ll be interesting to see what she can do. She’s got a lot of confidence, which is good for a nine. She’s got really good vision and can spot gaps, has quick feet and makes good decisions under pressure.“Sarah Law is the other nine and they’re two quite different players. They should spur each other on to put in exciting performances.”Teenage dream: Keira BevanWALESThe Welsh also had a disappointing Six Nations last year, winning only one game, but captain Rachel Taylor believes they have a lot of young talent coming through. She is expecting big things from lock Shona Powell Hughes, who made her debut in 2010 and has played in two World Cups but is still only 23, and name checks Kerin Lake, who is back playing after taking time away from rugby to start a family. Leading ladies: the Women’s Six Nations captains pose with the trophy Photo: Inpho center_img Find out who to keep an eye out for in the 2015 women’s championship THE Women’s Six Nations runs concurrently with the men’s championship and ahead of kick-off on Friday 6 February, Rugby World has asked the captains of each team to pick out the players to watch over the coming weeks…Fresh face: Lock Abbie ScottENGLANDTamara Taylor is leading England as they look to build on last year’s Women’s World Cup triumph by winning the Six Nations. The lock picks out Bristol centre Amber Reed as an exciting prospect in the backs, but in terms of a new face in the squad she points to her second-row partner at Darlington Mowden Park Sharks Abbie Scott. “She’s one of the new-age second-rows who’s very athletic,” explains Taylor. “Her biggest strength is her strength, in mind as well as body. She’s very determined as a person and as an athlete she’s good in the lineout, strong in the loose and a good ball-carrier.”FRANCEAfter leading the team to a Grand Slam and third place at the World Cup in 2014, Gaelle Mignot continues as captain – but she didn’t want to name names when it came to players to watch in a squad that features eight uncapped players. “Everyone’s important, so you should keep an eye on all the new players in the group,” says the hooker.Full force: Safi N’Diaye takes on the Welsh defence in last year’s Six Nations. Photo: Huw Evans AgencyHowever, new forwards coach Jean-Michel Gonzalez was happy to step up to the plate. As well as Safi N’Diaye, the No 8 among the nominees for IRB Women’s Player of the Year, and winger Caroline Boujard, Gonzalez also points to Camille Cabalou. He expects Cabalou to comfortably fill the boots of stalwart fly-half Sandrine Agricole, who retired after the World Cup. “She’s a girl for the future,” he says. “She played with the U20s and is now in the senior XVs group and she has a big future.”IRELANDAnother IRB Player of the Year nominee, Niamh Briggs, leads Ireland this season. A raft of players have retired since the World Cup, which included that win over New Zealand, so there are 12 new faces in the squad, “all with different attributes” according to their captain.The full-back struggles to select just one name from the dozen but highlights Sene Naoupu, whose husband George plays in the back row for Connacht. The New Zealand-born centre/fly-half qualified to play for Ireland on residency last year and Briggs says: “She’s a very good player and brings a bit of flair, something different to the squad.”Mind the gap: Niamh Briggs cuts through Italy at the Aviva Stadium last year. Photo: InphoITALYThe Italians beat Wales and Scotland during last season’s championship to finish fourth in the table and this year’s Six Nations represents the first step on the road to the 2017 World Cup. England, France and Ireland have already qualified thanks to their finishing positions in WRWC 2014, while the two best performing teams out of Italy, Scotland and Wales over the 2015 and 2016 Six Nations will qualify for the next global showpiece.last_img read more

See More

Rugby Championship: Wallabies determined to end All Blacks losing streak

first_img Pumped up: The Wallabies have enjoyed some impressive wins in the 2015 Rugby Championship By Andrew Elliott “I can’t wait to see what he can offer playing next to exciting youngsters such as Handre Pollard, Damian de Allende and Jesse Kriel.“Jean now has 160 minutes of rugby behind him since his comeback a month ago and I’m very satisfied that he’ll be able to make his mark as a player and captain.”The return of de Villers means Kriel moves from the centre to the wing, while injuries have ruled out openside Francois Louw and prop Jannie du Plessis, with Marcell Coetzee and Vincent Koch coming into the side as replacements.Argentina coach Daniel Hourcade has rung the changes for the clash in Durban after dropping eight players from the team who lost to Australia, including veteran back-row Juan Martin Fernandez Lobbe. AUSTRALIA will unleash all their big guns on New Zealand in the Rugby Championship decider at ANZ Stadium on Saturday as they seek to end a ten-match winless streak against the All Blacks that stretches back to 2011.Undoubtedly the main talking point is the Wallabies decision to pick a back-row with David Pocock at No 8 and Michael Hooper at openside. Hooper returns to start after serving a one-week ban for ‘striking’ Argentina fly-half Nicolas Sanchez, where he missed playing in the club fixture between Manly and Randwick.Inside-centre Matt Giteau has also been recalled after missing the 34-9 triumph over the Pumas in Mendoza, while Scott Fardy, Scott Sio, Sekope Kepu, James Horwill and former Exeter Chiefs lock Dean Mumm have all been named in Michael Cheika’s 31-man squad for the Sydney Test.With Australia leading the Rugby Championship from the All Blacks on points difference, New Zealand are bracing themselves for a full frontal assault, as the Wallabies look to secure their first Rugby Championship title.Challenged: Brodie Retallick goes up for lineout ballCheika, the former Waratahs head coach, has been credited with turning an oft-mocked Wallaby pack into a more aggressive outfit. But All Black lock Brodie Retallick, the reigning World Rugby Player of the Year, says his side are ready for the physical challenge.“You’re going to get guys who try to outmuscle you. You have to make a stand and match them – you can’t be pushed around like that,” said Retallick, 24.“Every week we talk about the need to be physical and win that battle. This week we need to make sure we step up to the mark as a pack.“That’s probably where they’ve made huge improvements, around their physicality and their pack.“The way the Waratahs play is a combative style – they’re in your face and always running hard at you. Michael (Cheika) has taken that into the Wallabies as their mentality.“We have to be up for the challenge and be better and more physical than they are. If you can stop that, turn it round and make it our strength, that will go a long way to helping us win.”Australia have not claimed the Bledisloe Cup since 2002 and New Zealand have won 25 of the past 31 Tests against the Wallabies, so it came as no surprise when Cheika said: “I don’t enjoy being the underdog, I just think that’s what we are.”Back in the mix: Jean de Villiers has gotten the all-clear to startJean de Villiers will return as South Africa skipper on Saturday against Argentina, his first Test since dislocating his kneecap and suffering significant ligament damage against Wales in Cardiff last November.Springboks coach Heyneke Meyer, whose side are still looking for their first win in this year’s truncated Rugby Championship and have never lost to the Pumas in 19 Tests, said: “Jean’s comeback is truly remarkable and very inspirational.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Australia: Israel Folau; Adam Ashley-Cooper, Tevita Kuridrani, Matt Giteau, Drew Mitchell; Bernard Foley, Nick Phipps; David Pocock, Michael Hooper, Scott Fardy, James Horwill, Dean Mumm, Sekope Kepu, Stephen Moore, Scott Sio.Subs: Tatafu Polota-Nau, James Slipper, Greg Holmes, Will Skelton, Ben McCalman, Nic White, Matt Toomua, Kurtley Beale.New Zealand: Ben Smith; Nehe Milner-Skudder, Conrad Smith, Sonny Bill Williams, Julian Savea; Daniel Carter, Aaron Smith; Kieran Read, Richie McCaw (capt), Jerome Kaino, Luke Romano, Brodie Retallick; Owen Franks, Dane Coles, Tony Woodcock.Subs: Codie Taylor, Ben Franks, Nepo Laulala, Sam Whitelock, Sam Cane, TJ Perenara, Beauden Barrett, Malakai Fekitoa.South Africa: Willie Le Roux; Jesse Kriel, Jean de Villiers (capt), Damian de Allende, Bryan Habana; Handre Pollard, Ruan Pienaar; Tendai Mtawarira, Bismarck du Plessis, Vincent Koch, Eben Etzebeth, Lood de Jager, Heinrich Brussow, Marcell Coetzee, Schalk Burger.Subs: Adriaan Strauss, Trevor Nyakane, Marcel van der Merwe, Pieter-Steph du Toit, Siya Kolisi, Cobus Reinach, Pat Lambie, Lwazi Mvovo.last_img read more

See More

Fitzgerald starts in Ireland’s Rugby World Cup opener following Henshaw injury

first_img Ireland centre Robbie Henshaw has failed in his battle for fitness ahead of Ireland’s Rugby World Cup opener against Canada resulting in Luke Fitzgerald starting at No 12.Henshaw injured a hamstring in Ireland’s final training session before travelling to England for the tournament.Dave Kearney retains his place on the wing at the expense of Tommy Bowe, while Munster’s Keith Earls edges out Simon Zebo for a place on the opposite flank.>>> Why Ireland have no reason to panic Luke Fitzgerald starts in the centres for Ireland’s Rugby World Cup opener against Canada after Robbie Henshaw’s hamstring injury Stand-in: Luke Fitzgerald will slot in at 12 in Robbie Henshaw’s absence Iain Henderson will partner captain Paul O’Connell in the second row, having beaten Devin Toner for the position. Towering lock Toner does not even make the bench, with coach Joe Schmidt preferring the versatility of Donnacha Ryan, who can also cover at flanker.center_img Ireland: R Kearney; D Kearney, J Payne, L Fitzgerald, K Earls; J Sexton, C Murray; J McGrath, R Best, M Ross; I Henderson, P O’Connell (capt), P O’Mahony, S O’Brien, J Heaslip.Replacements: S Cronin, C Healy, N White, D Ryan, C Henry, E Reddan, I Madigan, S Zebo. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

See More