More cafe and sandwich chains make FSA healhy food pledge

first_imgFour more café chains have agreed to work with the Food Standards Agency (FSA) to promote healthier eating through their shops. Camden Food Co, John Lewis Partnership Cafés, Sainsbury’s Cafés and Upper Crust have followed big chains such as Greggs and Starbucks in announcing various healthy eating commitments in conjunction with the FSA. Initiatives focus on reducing salt and saturated fat, providing more nutritional information and promoting healthier options on menus. Upper Crust, which is owned by travel food retail operator SSP and has over 60 shops in railway stations and airports, plans to develop a programme of recipe amendments on items that do not meet the FSA salt targets or which earn ‘red’ traffic lights by 2010. The company will also investigate calorie content labelling and better nutritional labelling.Sainsbury’s, which operates 242 cafés, plans to cut saturated fat by 18% by changing the cooking oil it uses in its cafés and will trial milk with a 1% fat content rather than semi-skimmed.All four café chains will regularly report to the FSA on the progress they are making with their initiatives.last_img read more

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Angry United fans target Woodward’s £2m mansion with fireworks, smoke bomb

first_img Loading… But when nobody answered inside the mansion, the mob decided to throw a red smoke bomb before launching a firework at the house. The hooded gang – known as the ‘Men In Black’ due to their preference of dark clothing – also decided to spray red paint all over the large gates as they made their feelings known. After the attack took place, the Premier League outfit issued a statement, insisting anyone found guilty at the scene would be banned for life by the club and ‘may face prosecution’. The statement said: ‘Manchester United Football Club have tonight been made aware of the incident outside the home of one of our employees. ‘We know that the football world will unite behind us as we work with Greater Manchester Police to identify the perpetrators of this unwarranted attack. Woodward (centre right) lives with his wife, Isabelle (centre left) and his two daughters Read Also: Fernandes excited as he prepares to hit Manchester ahead of £68m move ‘Anybody found guilty of a criminal offence, or found to be trespassing on this property, will be banned for life by the club and may face prosecution. Fans expressing opinion is one thing, criminal damage and intent to endanger life is another. There is simply no excuse for this.’ Cheshire Police later issued a statement: ‘At around 10.45pm on January 28, Cheshire Police were notified of an incident of criminal damage that had taken place earlier this evening with a large group targeting a property in the Nether Peover area. ‘Thankfully no-one was harmed, and officers will liaise with security officials over the coming days to establish the full circumstances surrounding this incident and identify those involved.’ FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 United are in danger of missing out on the Champions League for a second season running During their recent Premier League defeat at home to Burnley and FA Cup victory against Tranmere, some United fans could be heard singing a song about Woodward and the Glazer family burning on a fire. ‘Build a bonfire, build a bonfire, put the Glazers on the top, put Ed Woodward in the middle and burn the f***ing lot,’ sang the United fans to the tune of the famous 19th century American folk song, Clementine. But the protests have now taken an even more sinister turn after a mob of around 20 balaclava-clad supporters – some who are understood to be members of United’s notorious ‘Men In Black’ hooligan firm – launched an attack on his luxurious Cheshire mansion, in which he lives with his wife, Isabelle, and two very young twin daughters. A group of hooded Manchester United fans attacked chief executive Ed Woodward’s house Woodward and his family were not at the house at the time of the incident, according to ESPN. The gang assembled outside the house and rang an intercom on his large gates at the entrance on Tuesday night. A group of furious Manchester United supporters launched fireworks and a smoke bomb at under-fire chief executive Ed Woodward’s £2million Cheshire mansion. Woodward has come under plenty of scrutiny, in particular from United’s fanbase, as the club continue to struggle and fall even further away from the Premier League summit. Promoted Content10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoTop 10 Iconic Personalities On TV NowInsane 3D Spraying Skills Turn In Incredible Street ArtWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?Robert Pattinson Showed The GQ Magazine What Quarantining MeansBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemA Soviet Shot Put Thrower’s Record Hasn’t Been Beaten To This Day7 Universities In The World With The Highest Market Value12 Flicks That Almost Ended Their Stars’ Careers7 Theories About The Death Of Our UniverseIt Might Be Quentin Tarantino’s Last MovieThis Guy Photoshopped Himself Into Celeb Pics And It’s Hystericallast_img read more

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Syracuse drops 3rd-straight match in 3-1 loss to North Carolina

first_imgIn its third game of a four-game road trip, Syracuse (5-11, 2-7 Atlantic Coast) lost its third match in a row, this time 3-1 to North Carolina (9-10, 6-3).Syracuse struggled to produce much offense outside of Polina Shemanova, who racked up game-high 23 kills. Ella Saada, who entered averaging 11.73 kills per match this season, tallied just six kills, to go along with seven attacking errors. Without Saada’s typical offensive production, freshman middle blocker Abby Casiano provided a career-high seven kills.The first set was tightly contested early on as SU and UNC exchanged scoring runs. Two late 3-0 SU runs, separated only be a Shemanova service error, brought the Orange within one point, trailing 19-18. Eventually, UNC was able to close out the set, taking it 25-21.To begin the second set, it looked like the Tar Heels would continue to pull away, opening the set with four straight points. The run seemed to wake up Syracuse. The Orange proceeded to win the next eight points, including five straight UNC attacking errors before a Berkley Hayes service error halted SU’s run. From there, the teams traded points, with neither outfit able to build a lead greater than three points. Following an Elena Karakasi kill that put the Orange ahead 23-22, UNC took a timeout. After the break, the Tar Heels won three straight points to win the set 25-23. Losing the second set marked eight straight sets lost for Syraucse, dating back to an Oct. 18 3-1 loss to Miami.The third set followed the pattern of the first two, with SU and UNC largely exchanging points. Consecutive aces from Hayes sparked some momentum for the Orange, as it eventually jumped out to a 20-14 lead. SU survived a few scares from the UNC, including a 4-0 Tar Heel run, but Shemanova bookended the set with kills as SU took the set 25-21.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textUNC quickly asserted an 8-3 advantage in the fourth set. By this point in the match, SU was struggling to produce anything on offense outside of Shemanova, who single-handedly kept the set respectable by providing seven of the Orange’s 10 kills in the set. Ultimately, the Tar Heels comfortably took the set 25-17.Up next for Syracuse is the final game of its road trip as it faces North Carolina State on Sunday. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on October 25, 2019 at 9:22 pm Contact Alex: [email protected] | @alexhamer8last_img read more

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H-DNL girl’s golf: Henry, Sundberg lead field at Baywood

first_imgThe reign of Avary Henry continued Thursday at Baywood Golf and Country Club as the Arcata High golfer captured her fourth individual win in what was the fourth round of the season.Henry shot an 86 to rule the day, fending off McKinleyville’s Phoebe Sundberg who finished second with an 87.McKinleyville’s Isabella Sundberg came in third with a 92-stroke day. Arcata golfers rounded out the top-5 as Kate Plumley and Brook Bisgrove finished in fourth and fifth-place with scores of 105 and 106, …last_img read more

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Selling Confabulation as Science

first_imgScience is supposed to be all about demonstrable proof through experiment.  Should some scientists get away with confabulation – mere storytelling?  Look at these recent headlines published on science news sites and consider whether some serious housecleaning is in order. 1.  Baby apes’ arm waving hints at origins of language:  New Scientist had no problem with the suggestion that arm waving by chimpanzees led to the Sermon on the Mount and every other great work of moral or conceptual communication. “Actions speak louder than words,” wrote Nora Schultz cheerfully, as if that justifies scientifically what she is about to say. “Baby chimps, bonobos, gorillas and orang-utans – our four closest living relatives – quickly learn to use visual gestures to get their message across, providing the latest evidence that hand waving may have been a vital first step in the development of human language.”  Then why did apes get stuck at such a simplistic vocabulary?  Michael Corballis (U of Auckland) came to the rescue with this confabulation: “I suspect apes have evolved their own idiosyncratic gestures since they diverged from hominins.” 2.  Whiskers marked milestone in evolution of mammals from reptiles:  With no evidence of a bewhiskered reptile anywhere, PhysOrg published notions coming from “research” at the University of Sheffield that whiskers led to an explosion of possibilities in the mammal world.  On what evidence is this based?  Merely that a grey short-tailed opossum “has many similarities to an early mammal that would have lived more than 125 million years ago; that is, around the same time that the evolutionary lines leading to modern rodents and marsupials diverged.”  No such mammal is found in the fossil record.  But wait: aren’t marsupials and rodents both mammals?  Where are the reptiles claimed in the headline?  “This evidence suggests that some of the first mammals may also have whisked like a modern mouse or rat, and that the appearance of moveable whiskers was pivotal in the evolution of mammals from reptiles.”  In other words, no evidence for transitional forms was presented at all – just the assumption that mammals evolved from reptiles.  And that’s not all: a “professor” piled on additional miracles: “This latest research suggests that alongside becoming warm-blooded, giving birth to live young, and having an enlarged brain, the emergence of a new tactile sense based on moveable facial whiskers was an important step along the evolutionary path to modern mammals,” said Tony Prescott.  “Although humans no longer have moveable whiskers they were a critical feature of our early mammalian ancestors.”  According to this confabulation, bearded men can only regret that they are devolved remnants of some imaginary power-whiskered reptile with a great future ahead. 3.  Seeking Alien Artifacts in the Solar System:  Astrobiology Magazine, funded by NASA, posted an interesting press release that suggests that, possibly, conceivably, there might be not not aliens (double negative intended).  That is, just because we haven’t found any alien artifacts orbiting the sun yet doesn’t necessarily mean they don’t exist.  Scientists at Penn State have concocted some kind of equation that is supposed to let them know whether we’ve looked hard enough yet.  The conclusion at this point is, “The researchers found that it is, at this point, difficult to say that there are not nonterrestrial objects in our solar system.”  Presumably it is, at this point, difficult to say that there are not angels in our solar system (insert any unknown you wish). 4.  Welcome to the multiverse:  Discover Magazine gave sprightly coverage to Caltech prof Sean Carroll, giving him free rein to describe his conversion to the multiverse religion.  “Could our universe be just one of a multitude, each with its own reality?” he asked.  “It may sound like fiction, but there is hard science behind this outlandish idea.”  The reader hunts for said hard science as he is dragged through another retelling of one of science’s favorite martyr tales, the burning at the stake of Giordano Bruno,1 as if this will provide insurance against a similar fate for Carroll for what he is about to say.  Safely inoculated against taking heat, he continues: “These days, cosmologists like me may be safer, but our ideas have grown only more radical…. Also like Bruno, cosmologists are reaching far beyond what observational evidence can tell them.”  Looking still for the “hard science” he promised, we get this line: “It is not that cosmologists are so fond of all those universes; it’s that we are fond of inflation, because inflation explains the observed properties of the cosmos with great precision. But many versions of inflation theory also predict an infinite number of universes, like it or not.”2  Adding string theory to the mix doesn’t help his case much, since both theories have no observational support.  Carroll knows this: “Even if such a theory were true, the worry goes, how would we ever know? Is it scientific to even talk about it?”  We’re like tribesmen on a cloudy planet who can’t see the stars, he explains, only our cloud is the big bang.  Imagine if everyone took his final advice: “Right now we don’t know, and that’s fine. That’s how science works; the fun questions are the ones we can’t yet answer. The proper scientific approach is to take every reasonable possibility seriously, no matter how heretical it may seem, and to work as hard as we can to match our theoretical speculations to the cold data of our experiments.”  That’s odd.  This was his first and only mention of “experiments.” 5.  Searching for the origins of life… and our future:  While presenting multiverses, why not present science as the answer to everything, past present, and future?  Why not build a cathedral to whatever evidence-free notion a scientist has to say about the really big questions?  Karen Weintraub saw no problems with this in her BBC News article about NASA’s Origins program.  If she’s right, there is no limit to anything scientists want to say about anything.  Her hero is Professor Dimitar Sasselov of Harvard, head of a project called “Origins of Life.”  Even though he knows it is unlikely anyone will solve the origin of life for a century or more, he believes he is preaching science.  He even prophesies: “One morning we’ll wake up with a fundamentally different view of the world and who we are.”  Other players enter Hollywood-alien-decorated article as Weintraub asks, “What is life?” and other big questions, sans evidence.  But evidence is not needed if you can assert something and back it up with an appeal to authority.  “Lawrence Krauss, a physicist who leads the Origins Project at Arizona State University, says trying to figure out how the universe came from nothing doesn’t tread on religious ground, either – at least no more than Copernicus and Darwin did.”  If some technological spinoff comes from all this “pure science” that Weintraub claims is happening thanks to taxpayer dollars, won’t it be worth it?  Her last paragraph lets the cat out of the bag: “Instead of building the metaphorical buildings that most three-year scientific grants afford today, he [John Sutherland, molecular biologist] says, the Origins researchers are constructing a cathedral. It may take them a century to find answers, but what they build will still be standing in a millennium.”  Yes, there will be pay day, someday, in the sweet by and by.  Keep those offering plates coming. 1. Giordano Bruno (1548-1600) was not burned at the stake for embracing Copernicanism or positing a multiplicity of worlds, but for advocating multiple heresies against the Catholic teachings, dabbling in magic, and espousing weird beliefs such as transmigration of souls into animals.  Regrettable as his execution was, the myth that Bruno was a martyr to science was first proposed in the 19th century by Andrew Dickson White, whose “warfare hypothesis” pitting science against religion has since been roundly criticized by historians of science.  For example, see Maya Bohnhoff’s blog entry on Common Ground Group.  Even Wikipedia downplays the notion that Bruno was a martyr to science. 2. Inflation is neither an observation nor confirmation of big-bang cosmology, but instead, was an ad hoc proposal by Alan Guth in the 1980s to overcome serious flaws in the standard big bang model. Since then, his theory-rescue device has taken on a life of its own, with other cosmologists offering even more outlandish models, each unobservable and untestable. See 9/29/2009, 2/21/2005, also 10/6/2004. Oh, what tangled webs of belief science weaved, when Darwin first let the confabulators in to deceive (12/22/2003 commentary).  The scientists in the stories above are not dumb.  They had to show a pretty high level of intelligence (or parental money, or a good advisor) to get through the rigors of a PhD program.  But is a PhD credential a license to say anything?  There are PhD’s in other fields, too (history, philosophy, theology) who have just as much knowledge and intelligence, and who exhibit far better integrity and exercise far more rigor in their research than the storytellers above. Out of their own mouths they condemned themselves as con artists and false prophets, offering some kind of enlightenment they can’t describe that may take a century to get here, long after current taxpayers are dead. You wouldn’t fall for a snake oil salesman making a promise like that.  Why take it from a so-called scientist?  Out of their own mouths they condemned themselves as priests of a gnostic religion, divining visions of emanations from other universes, or visions of mythical transitional animals their religion requires.  You wouldn’t fall for a mystery religion that taught things like that; why take it from a so-called scientist? Out of their own mouths they condemned themselves as manipulators, taking the public as dupes and fools by associating chimpanzee arm-waving with Newton’s Principia.  You wouldn’t take that kind of ridicule from anyone; why allow it from a so-called scientist?  If we can take Carroll at his word, “the fun questions are the ones science can’t answer, so the only reasonable approach is to take every reasonable possibility seriously, no matter how heretical it may seem” – such as the reasonable possibility that the so-called scientists and so-called reporters above are all nuts. This kind of unmitigated evidence-free garbage spews non-stop from the sewer pipes of science news outlets, alongside the clean, healthy fare.  It’s like having a kitchen sink with knobs for hot water, cold water, and sewage, the sewage turning on by default any time you turn on the other knobs.  The clean water taps represent science that is observable, testable, and repeatable – the kind of science we learned as children, the kind we were led to believe represented the practices and ideals of all who wore the proud label “scientist.”  The sewage is sent across the internet pipes unfiltered, requiring the consumer to turn it off. It’s a deplorable situation.  It started with Darwin and his X-men, who were determined to (1) substitute naturalism for design, and (2) make confabulation permissible in science.  If scientists were required to shut up unless they had something observable, testable and repeatable to say, the sewage pipes would shut off.  Don’t count on it.  There’s too much momentum and money involved.  The naturalistic web of belief is now made of steel girders with battleship-heavy chains, able to absorb the shocks of any falsifying evidence.  All we can do is hope that the confabulators have some conscience left, so that when publicly shamed, they might repent.  Reward those researchers who stick to the classical standards for science.  Train the young to appreciate real science but to deplore the deceitful interlopers.  Vote wisely.  Speak out.  And reach your network with the truth, one soul at a time.(Visited 22 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Mobile counsellor helps youth

first_imgBanetsi Mphunga, a qualified counsellor, standing next to his Caracara. The vehicle will be used as a mobile psychology unit to serve the people of Khayelitsha. (Image: Ground Up)A vehicle known in the township as a caracara for its coolness is adding a coolness factor to psychological interventions in the township of Khayelitsha, in Cape Town.Banetsi Mphunga, a qualified counsellor, bought a VW microbus, popularly known as a caracara in the townships, in May. Because it is the size of a small room, he decided to turn it into a mobile psychology unit.Mphunga’s caracara will offer free help to township youth who are dealing with psychological trauma.He told Ground Up, the news organisation that focuses on social justice stories: “I grew up in Khayelitsha. I am a registered counsellor by profession. The idea of the mobile clinic started after realising the need for psychological services here in the township. I realised this from the kids that I worked with in a previous programme; it was an after school care programme.“I was a programme manager for psycho-social skills, high school level, which is the group that is most vulnerable when it comes to substance abuse and gangsterism.”PSYCHOLOGICAL ISSUESMphunga was inspired when he saw problems manifest in other children when they had to interact with others during his study group. This is when he realised many needed psychological interventions in their lives.“They always manifested in front of other children and I had to constantly intervene,” he explained. “I enquired from my educator friends, principals and school kids about why they are not making use of psychological services and counsellors in schools.“This is where I discovered that in order to get psychological assistance, they had to wait for weeks to be attended to by someone from the Department of Education, because they didn’t have counsellors at school. So I thought starting a practice could help the community.”TEACHER CALLED EXPERIENCEMphunga is no stranger to the effects of substance abuse. “I also experimented with drugs while growing up,” he admitted. “I started smoking weed and then from there I did mandrax, but luckily I managed to stop before I became an addict and before my family found out. But these days, kids are not that lucky.”Since buying the vehicle in May, Mphunga has used it to lead a study group of four schoolchildren, which sparked the idea to use the minibus as a practice.“A kombi is more or less the same size as the rooms that I have viewed that I would be using and running the practice from. The study group tested my idea of using the kombi as a practice and I saw, I could do it. I can engage with the kids in comfort and no-one can just walk in and disturb us,” he said.“So I just need to have this kombi fixed interior-wise, put tinted windows and branding, then I will have a clinic that can assist these kids. This is a popular van among these kids, because everywhere I go kids note the green kombi even though there’s nothing special about it. They even start singing the hit song Caracara when they see the car. So since it’s a popular van it can work well as a consultation room.”Although in need of funding to equip the kombi fully, Mphunga said nothing would stop him from starting to operate in August. He would use the mobile practice as a referral agent to rehabilitation centres.“Something that I have noted in my observation of psychological services,” he added, “is that kids default on their therapy sessions because they are stigmatised for seeking psychological assistance because there is this thing in society that if you seek psychological assistance, then there is something wrong with you, that you are mentally challenged or you are weak.“There’s also an issue of fear of the clinical environment. They feel intimidated by the environment and talking to someone. The kombi can serve as an initiating tool for therapy.”First sessions could take place in the mobile practice, with referrals and follow-up sessions at a more established venue. Mphunga has applied for rooms.“Not all sessions will be in the kombi, only those that need immediate help. Like for example when there has been a shooting in school, we will be there. The kombi will be like an emotional ambulance.”last_img read more

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Gardening weed ID class July 6

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Secrest Arboretum, like gardens everywhere, has its share of weeds. And Paul Snyder, who works there as a program assistant, has seen their best and worst.Canada thistle, common moonseed and marestail are the toughest to manage, Snyder said.“Moonseed completely smothers everything,” he said. “Marestail has become resistant to glyphosate (a weed killer) and produces thousands of tiny seeds.“Jumpseed and bittersweet are the sneakiest. They have a knack for blending in with other plants.”Canada thistle, however, is the prettiest, Snyder said.It has “wonderful flowers that smell great,” he said.On July 6, participants will discover those weeds and others — and specifically how to identify and control them — in the arboretum’s Summer Weed ID Class. It’s from 8 to 10 a.m. Snyder will be the instructor.The 115-acre arboretum is at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster, about an hour south of Cleveland. OARDC scientists use the arboretum for research on landscape plants, while thousands of people visit its display gardens every year.Those gardens, it seems, have a secret.“Our landscape beds aren’t spotless like everyone thinks,” Snyder said. “You just have to know what to look for.”The class will give weed-spotting tips. It also will share details on the arboretum’s own weed control practices, including a new strategy against marestail being tried for the first time this summer.Marestail is a bear to control, Snyder said.“If you spray it with glyphosate, it branches and becomes almost impossible to pull because it snaps off. But if you pull it, you disrupt the soil and let even more of them grow,” he said.Registration for the class is $10 for members of the Friends of Secrest Arboretum and $15 for nonmembers. Details and a link to register are at go.osu.edu/SummerWeedID. Call 330-263-3761 for more information.The class will meet in the arboretum’s Jack and Deb Miller Pavilion.OARDC, which is at 1680 Madison Ave. in Wooster, is the research arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University.last_img read more

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9 months agoArsenal keeper Cech announces retirement

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Arsenal keeper Cech announces retirementby Freddie Taylor9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal goalkeeper Petr Cech will retire at season’s end.The 36-year-old will be out of contract in the summer, but has decided against finding another club.He posted in a message on social media: “This is my 20th season as a professional player and it has been 20 years since I signed my first professional contract, so it feels like the right time to announce that I will retire at the end of this season.”Having played 15 years in the Premier League, and won every single trophy possible, I feel like I have achieved everything I set out to achieve.”I will continue to work hard at Arsenal and hopefully win one more trophy this season, then I am looking forward to seeing what life holds for me off the pitch.” last_img read more

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7 days agoNapoli president De Laurentiis open to re-signing Higuain

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Napoli president De Laurentiis open to re-signing Higuainby Carlos Volcano7 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveNapoli president Aurelio De Laurentiis says he’d be prepared to re-sign Gonzalo Higuain.Back with Juventus after a six month loan spell with Chelsea, Higuain has hit the ground running under former Napoli coach Maurizio Sarri.De Laurentiis said: “Sarri has many positive sides and some that are negative. In England he has improved, Juve has different dressing room dynamics from ours. “Higuain? If (Carlo) Ancelotti asked me, I would say why not…?” He added: “Against Liverpool, I saw the real Napoli.” last_img read more

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