English amateurs to play in WPGA Challenge

first_img9 Oct 2014 English amateurs to play in WPGA Challenge Fifteen top English women amateurs will be in the field when the WPGA International Challenge returns to Stoke by Nayland next week. The 54-hole event, which takes place from October 16-18, is the only event on the LET Access Series to be staged in the UK in 2014. It was launched last year by the PGA to increase support of the women’s game and the field will include 15 WPGA members In a boost for leading amateurs, 15 places have also been earmarked for England Golf, recognising LETAS’s commitment to providing an important link between elite amateur and professional golf. The 15 amateurs who have been offered places are: Annabel Bailey (Kirby Muxloe, Leicestershire), Lianna Bailey (Kirby Muxloe, Leicetershire), Gemma Clews (Delamere Forest, Cheshire), India Clyburn (Woodhall Spa, Lincolnshire), Gabriella Cowley (Hanbury Manor, Hertfordshire), Annabel Dimmock (Wentworth, Surrey), Emma Goddard (Royal Liverpool, Cheshire), Lucy Goddard (Hanbury Manor, Hertfordshire), Ellie Goodall (Selby, Yorkshire), Alice Hewson (Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire), Lauren Horsford (Wimbledon Park, Surrey), Sophie Keech (Parkstone, Dorset), Alex Peters (Notts Ladies, Nottinghamshire, image © Leaderboard Photography), Bethan Popel (Long Ashton, Gloucestershire) and Kerry Smith (Waterlooville, Hampshire). The opportunity for England’s leading women amateurs to gain valuable experience has been praised by Rebecca Wood, Women’s Performance Manager at England Golf. She said: “England Golf is delighted to be a partner with the LET Access Tour. The Access Tour provides a valuable opportunity for our top players as they progress from their amateur career by providing entry to competitive professional events.” Di Barnard, Tour Director of the LET Access Series said: “We are delighted the 2014 WPGA International Challenge will be played at Stoke by Nayland Hotel Golf and Spa. “The event receives great support from the PGA and England Golf and is a very important stop on the LETAS schedule, as a large part of the membership hails from the UK. The Gainsborough course at Stoke by Nayland is a wonderful test for the players and we look forward to welcoming everyone to the tournament.” Hannah Ralph won last year’s inaugural tournament and organisers expect another strong field with a minimum prize fund of €30,000 at stake in the tournament. Situated on the Suffolk/Essex border, Stoke by Nayland has the experience of staging European Challenge Tour, European Senior Tour and PGA Europro events. Susanna Rendall, managing director of the family-owned Stoke by Nayland Hotel, Golf & Spa, said: “We are absolutely thrilled to once again be hosting the WPGA International Challenge. “We very much look forward to welcoming these talented golfers here from all over the world – and to playing our part in helping to promote women’s international golf.”last_img read more

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White football players who put noose on Black teammate expelled

first_imgWYNNE, Ark. (AP) — The Wynne School Board has expelled two junior varsity football players who were accused of placing a noose around the neck of a Black student.. The board met in executive session Wednesday and decided to expel the two students for the rest of the semester. The Jonesboro Sun reports that it’s a lesser punishment that the one recommended by Superintendent Carl Easley, who supported expulsion for the rest of the school year. Easley says five students were originally suspended. He declined further comment.Few details have been released about the alleged incident. Family members have said the White students placed a noose around the 14-year-old Black student’s neck, but authorities have not confirmed that account.Police in Wynne say no one was injured and that an investigation shows no criminal activity took place.More than 150 people attended the hearing. Many were angered by the board’s decision, and Wynne police were called in to calm the crowd.Information from: The Jonesboro Sun, http://www.jonesborosun.com.last_img read more

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Norton Street man remanded on robbery charge

first_imgA 29-year-old man was remanded to prison on Wednesday when he appeared at the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts to answer to an armed robbery charge.Waldron Rogers, of Lot 6 Norton Street, Georgetown, appeared before Magistrate Faith McGusty where he pleaded not guilty to the charge when it was read to him.It is alleged that on April 20, 2019 in Georgetown, the defendant robbed Delroy Wilson of $12,000 in cash.The court heard that on the day in question, the accused was walking when he confronted and robbed the Virtual Complainant (VC). After committing the act, the accused reportedly escaped, but was later arrested by the Police.Prosecutor Ceon Blackman objected to bail on the grounds the defendant is known to law enforcement and he was also positively identified by the victim.Bail was refused, and Rogers’ next appearance is slated for May 8, 2019.last_img read more

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Local drivers in Las Vegas for start of 2019 NHRA season

first_img“This weekend was intended as a test weekend as we put new transmission setup in the car last Friday. Just needs a little adjustment and all is good.”In the meantime, while still in Vegas, Kowalski says he has his 1970 Chevrolet Nova with him and will be racing in the Spring Fling from Tuesday, April 16, to the 20.Following Las Vegas, Kowalski will be heading off to Boise, Idaho, from May 3 to the 5, with his Nova for the NAPA Auto Parts Ignitor Nitro Opener at Firebird Raceway. LAS VEGAS, N.V. – Dave Kowalski, of Fort St. John, is in Las Vegas for the start of the 2019 National Hot Rod Association season.Also down in Las Vegas is Mike Lucas with his 1968 1250 hp Chevrolet Camaro and Matt Dohm.Over the weekend, Kowalski was qualifying for the Lucas Oil Drag Racing Series Pacific Division Race with his Corvette.- Advertisement -During the qualifiers, Kowalski says he was able to run his Corvette 6.16 seconds at 225 mph qualifying in the number two spot but later ran into difficulties such as the transmission not shifting properly into fifth gear.“With the vette, we ran 6.16 seconds at 225 mph qualifying us in the number two spot. We suffered a burnt piston as the engine hit the rev limiter at 10,200 rpm. The transmission didn’t shift from fourth gear to fifth so unfortunately, that put us out for the weekend.”Despite those setbacks causing him not to advance, Kowalski says this past weekend was intended as a test weekend since he recently put in a new transmission. He adds that his car will be good after some adjustments.Advertisementlast_img read more

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Science Without an Object: Astrobiology, Alien Science

first_imgCan science exist without an observable object?  In recent years we have seen serious scientists ponder alternate universes and parallel universes, dark matter, dark energy and other imponderable entities.  String theory has yet to rest on observable data, and physicists at CERN are getting worried about not finding the hypothetical Higgs boson (see article on Deseret News).  Sooner or later, these theories need to detect their subjects or lose credibility in the science club.  Perhaps nowhere else has the disconnect between hype and observation reached the absurd limits of astrobiology and alien science. Astrobiology and SETI concern different objects, the former life, the latter intelligent life.  But to evolutionists these are only a matter of degree.  Intelligent or not, life emerged by natural causes according to their proponents.  NASA has a federally-funded Astrobiology Institute that regularly publishes popular articles about extraterrestrial life.  SETI is currently privately funded, but once was on the federal dole, and could conceivably be again someday.  The problem with both these “sciences” is the lack of an observable object.  Without the constraint of observations, speculation can run rampant, as the following examples show. Duney tunes:  Some astrobiologists apparently like Dune more than Waterworld.  Long thought to be essential for life, water is drying up in speculations published by Astrobiology Magazine, claiming that worlds of sand dunes might be the best habitable worlds after all.  Yes, Space.com affirms in its copy, “Desert planets like the one depicted in the science fiction classic ‘Dune’ might be the most common type of habitable planet in the galaxy, rather than watery worlds such as Earth, a new study suggests.”  Suggestions are the only option without data.  While suggesting things, they might as well pour on the spice trade; “And that’s not the only surprising result,” the article continues.  “The study also hints that scorching-hot Venus, where surface temperatures average 860 degrees Fahrenheit (460 degrees Celsius), might have been a habitable desert world as recently as 1 billion years ago.” Life rafts:  Astrobiology merges seamlessly into origin-of-life studies, since the processes thought to cause the natural emergence of life on Earth must happen elsewhere, the thinking goes.  That being the case, why not speculate about life rafts?  Astrobiology Magazine envisioned “Volcanic pumice as rafts of life” in another speculative article.  “The researchers, writing in the September issue of the journal Astrobiology, argue that pumice has a unique set of properties which would have made it an ideal habitat for the earliest organisms that emerged on Earth over 3.5 billion years ago.”  Astrobiologists, lacking observable objects to study, need to keep the funding flowing by looking busy printing their speculations in their own journals.  Maybe they test their hypothesis by looking for pumice rafts in the fossil record, the article speculated, or see what happens when they shine UV light on pumice.  But would any results from those look-busy experiments have any necessary connection to their hypothesis? Panspermia in reverse:  Panspermia is the speculative idea that life was brought to Earth via comets or meteorites from somewhere else.  The converse would be that Earth life has been transported outward to other planets.  That idea was suggested on PhysOrg, “Earth could spread life across Milky Way.”  [Note: No life has been found on any other body outside Earth.]  If so, that possibility would seem to clutter any discovery of life on Mars or Europa with false positives – contamination from the one body we know has life.  Though the title seems absurd that life could travel across the Milky Way, given the vast distances between stars, Mauricio Reyes-Ruiz from the National Autonomous University of Mexico calculated that some particles blasted off the Earth, carrying microbes, might actually leave the solar system.  Imagine what might happen next. Nice aliens:  After the 15 minutes of fame NASA received last month for its announcement that aliens might punish earthlings for global warming (see 8/18/2011), PhysOrg has reconsidered whether alien encounters are all bad.  Whoops; that’s not about space aliens; it’s about alien invasions right here on Earth, like the zebra mussel taking over the Great Lakes.  Still, some of the principles may be applicable.  After all, it just moves the boundary condition from Earth’s biosphere to other biospheres.  “We’re not good at figuring out which species might be damaging,” one biologist lamented.  If that’s the case right under our noses, how much less can astrobiologists predict the impact of arrivals from outer space? Alien understudies:  It’s amazing how much science can be written without any data.  One way to stoke the muse is to let observable entities stand in for unobservable entities.  Keith Cooper at Astrobiology Magazine managed to do that by letting dolphins substitute for space aliens.  After discussing how Koko the dolphin struggled with a certain intelligence problem, he quoted an astrobiologist who said, “Now imagine an alien comes with more complex abilities….”  Imagine is the operative word. Back on Earth, tension is growing between astrobiology and cell biology.  Bruce Alberts, writing for Science last week,1 revealed a “Grand Challenge to Biology” trying to synthesize life.  “The remarkable advances in our knowledge of the chemistry of life achieved in the past few decades, published in Science and many other journals, could lead nonexperts to assume that biologists are coming close to a real understanding of cells,” he said.  “On the contrary, as scientists learn more and more, we have increasingly come to recognize how huge the challenge is that confronts us.”  Though confident of science’s march of progress, he worried about how scientists can make sense of the “enormous chemical complexity” of eukaryotic cells.  He suggested starting with the simplest free-living organisms, but even so, “biologists will need the help of mathematicians, computer scientists, and engineers to make sense of the enormously complicated network of molecular interactions found in even the least complex living cells.”  It would seem science needs a handle on the life under their noses before they can make any credible claims about unobservable entities out in space. 1. Bruce Alberts, “A Grand Challenge to Biology,” Science, 2 September 2011: Vol. 333 no. 6047 p. 1200, DOI: 10.1126/science.1213238. When religions try to do that (speculate about unobservable entities), scientists are indignant.  How dare they!  That is irrational!  But here in the religion of naturalism, the “mystery religion from the Victorian age” as Ann Coulter calls it, practitioners get federal funding and endless boilerplate from the slobbering lapdog media – you know, the same reporters who cannot write “intelligent design” without “religion” in the same sentence.  Astrobiology is the Science of Fantasyland, where your tax dollars bring thrill rides in black light, merry-go-rounds, magic castles in the air, cotton candy for the brain, Storybook Land, small worlds, and scientists in cartoon-character white lab coats.  Wafting through the air are the hypnotic words, When you wish upon a star, all your dreams come true.  It’s a magical, other-worldly experience, imagineered to transport your senses into mythical utopian dream worlds.  Snap out of it.(Visited 20 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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R33m to make Mahikeng top-notch

first_imgVarious neighbourhoods in Mahikeng will be upgraded. (Image: Bongani Nkosi) MEC Mahlakeng Mahlakeng announced the R33-million public investment. (Image: NWPG) MEDIA CONTACTS • Matshube Mfoloe Head of Communication Gauteng Department of Education +27 18 387 2447or +27 82 305 4594  RELATED ARTICLES • New ambulances for North West • Facelift for Athlone Station site • R4-billion for 4.5-million jobs • New centre to foster science careersBongani NkosiMahikeng, the capital of the North West province, will receive a R33-million (US$4.8-million) government-funded facelift to transform it into a model city.The provincial government announced the investment on 18 January 2011 in response to concerns that infrastructure in Mahikeng has been deteriorating.Part of the aim is to elevate the city to standards expected of a provincial capital city. “The R33-million is just a drop in an ocean if indeed we really want to give Mahikeng the look and a feel of what a capital city of the province should be,’’ said MEC for Public Works, Roads and Transport Mahlakeng Mahlakeng.Priority projects, which will begin soon, include refurbishing government buildings in Mahikeng and upgrading roads there.Mahikeng was known as Mafikeng until its name was officially changed in 2010.The neighbouring town of Mmabatho, where other government buildings are located, will also score from the investment with upgrades set to take place there as well.“My department will fast-track the refurbishment and the proper maintenance of government buildings, especially office buildings in Mahikeng and Mmabatho,” said Mahlakeng.He added that the ultimate aim is to attract further investments to spruce up Mahikeng. “I will also approach the National Department of Public Works … to find out from them how they can contribute in this massive project to give Mahikeng a desired facelift.” The R33-million in funding has been sourced from the budgets of other programmes being run by the North West Department of Public Works, Roads and Transport. Mahlakeng pointed out that this would not “compromise any of our other programmes and activities before the end of the financial year in March 2011”. The department will go all out to encourage other provincial departments, as well as the Mahikeng Local Municipality and the Ngaka Modiri Molema District Municipality, to help raise more funds for facelift projects, he added. “I will persuade them to dig very deep into their coffers to match our R33-million pledge and even go beyond.”Projects will form part of the government’s Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP), which has created jobs for many of South Africa’s unemployed youngsters. Adopted in 2004, EPWP aims to reduce the unemployment rate by creating 4.5-million full- and part-time jobs.Fixing roads after torrential rainsThe North West’s roads have been affected by the torrential rain that’s recently fallen in most parts of South Africa, and the problem of potholes has been exacerbated.The province has injected more than R180-million ($26-million) into major road repairs and maintenance following the bad weather. A total of 28 municipalities across the country, including four in the North West, have been declared disaster areas.Contractors for road maintenance and repairs will be appointed very soon, according to the MEC. “At least six roads per district will be resealed, patched and marked before the end of the month,’’ he said.Construction of a tarred road between Ganyesa and Tlakgameng, two districts within the province, is also expected to start soon.last_img read more

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Lyceum stays unbeaten, cruises to 10th straight win

first_imgBrace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC LATEST STORIES San Beda, Lyceum early favorites ahead of NCAA Season 93 PLAY LIST 02:12San Beda, Lyceum early favorites ahead of NCAA Season 9300:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Lyceum lost hold of its 17-point lead, 71-54 in the third quarter as Laurenz Victoria and Leo Gabo willed Mapua to get to as close as six late in the game.Robinson said that it’s something his team needs to work on as the Pirates gear up for tougher foes ahead.“That’s the challenge for us. If we want to stay on top, there’s a lot of responsibilities that come with it. We’re the barometer. Hopefully, this will be a wake up call for us that any team can beat us if we let our guards down,” he said.Gabo paced Mapua (1-9) with 21 points and five assists, while Christian Buñag had 18 markers and 14 rebounds in the loss.The Scores:ADVERTISEMENT For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses Read Next CJ Perez paced the Pirates with 22 points and nine rebounds, while Jaycee Marcelino got 19 markers, six boards, and two dimes.MJ Ayaay and Ralph Tansingco both chimed in 10 points apiece in Lyceum’s 10th straight win.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutCoach Topex Robinson, though, was dissatisfied with how his side reacted to the Cardinals’ challenge, as the cellar dwellers gave the Pirates everything they could handle.“I guess we didn’t play our usual game. We didn’t honor the game and it almost backfired on us. Credit to coach Atoy (Co) for preparing his team well for us,” the youthful mentor said. View comments UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension Africa champion Cameroon misses out on World Cupcenter_img Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Lyceum didn’t look like it missed a beat as it sustained its hot streak to the second round of the NCAA Season 93 men’s basketball tournament with a 96-90 victory over Mapua Tuesday at Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ LYCEUM 96 – Perez 22, Jc. Marcelino 19, Ayaay 10, Tansingco 10, Caduyac 8, Pretta 8, Jv. Marcelino 6, Liwag 5, Nzeusseu 5, Marata 3, Baltazar 0, Cinco 0, Ibañez 0, Santos 0.MAPUA 90 – Gabo 21, Buñag 18, Victoria 16, Aguirre 11, Nieles 9, Orquina 7, Pelayo 6, Raflores 2.Quarters: 20-21, 48-43, 73-58, 96-90. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Gameslast_img read more

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10 months agoAlaba backing Bayern Munich move for Atletico Madrid defender Lucas

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Alaba backing Bayern Munich move for Atletico Madrid defender Lucasby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBayern Munich wing-back David Alaba is backing their move for Atletico Madrid defender Lucas Hernandez.Even though Alaba plays at left-back, a position where the France international could earn minutes, the Austrian would be keen to see him sign.”He is certainly a good player,” he told BILD.”If he wasn’t then Bayern wouldn’t be interested in him.”I am sure he would be capable of helping us.”Addressing the potential competition for left-back minutes that this signing could provoke, Alaba explained that he isn’t worried.”I know that left-back works for me, but at this time I wouldn’t be worried about changing to a midfield position,” he stated. last_img read more

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9 months agoArsenal keeper Cech announces retirement

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Arsenal keeper Cech announces retirementby Freddie Taylor9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal goalkeeper Petr Cech will retire at season’s end.The 36-year-old will be out of contract in the summer, but has decided against finding another club.He posted in a message on social media: “This is my 20th season as a professional player and it has been 20 years since I signed my first professional contract, so it feels like the right time to announce that I will retire at the end of this season.”Having played 15 years in the Premier League, and won every single trophy possible, I feel like I have achieved everything I set out to achieve.”I will continue to work hard at Arsenal and hopefully win one more trophy this season, then I am looking forward to seeing what life holds for me off the pitch.” last_img read more

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6 days agoBrighton boss Potter proud of players in Aston Villa defeat

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Brighton boss Potter proud of players in Aston Villa defeatby Paul Vegas6 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveBrighton boss Graham Potter was proud of his players following their last-gasp defeat to Aston Villa.The Seagulls fell to Matt Targett’s last-minute strike, with the hosts prevailing 2-1, and the head coach stressed how proud he was of the players having seen his side play for a large part of the contest with ten men.He said, “It’s tough to take because the players were amazing and gave me everything.“With 11 players we were really good and worthy of our lead – the sending off affects the game and we played for nearly an hour with a man less, while still contributing to the match. “We still attacked often, so it’s heartbreaking to lose with the last kick, but I’m really proud of the performance.”Despite being a man down, Potter’s men created chances throughout the match in the Midlands, and the boss discussed the attacking style his side continued to maintain. “We still looked to win the game and the best way of hanging onto something is to continue to be yourselves,” he continued. “We played through their defence numerous times and weren’t camped inside our own half trying to defend.“We were positive and that’s what makes it more difficult to take – the reaction of the fans afterwards showed that they saw the quality and courage, but the game can be cruel.” last_img read more

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