Preserving Ohio history one barn painting at a time

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Bob Kroeger grew up in Youngstown and spent his career as a dentist in a Cincinnati suburb. So why is he interested in the old barns of rural Ohio?“It was like an epiphany. My wife and I were on vacation in Licking County. We drove down an old country road toward our bed and breakfast. There at the intersection on top of a little hill was an old gray barn. There were boards missing and the roof was sagging and it was like a thunderbolt hit me right between the eyes and a voice came to me. I don’t know where it came from. It said, ‘You’re going to paint this barn and write about it,’” Kroeger said. “The next morning we went to the farmhouse and an old man came to the door. I tried to explain what I wanted to do. Eventually he loosened up and told me the history of the barn. That was the start of it. That was in 2012.”Kroeger had done a fair amount of writing, but never painted much, though his father had been a commercial artist.“I started painting when I was four with my father. I remember I got spanking after I had played with my father’s paints and left them open,” he said. “I hadn’t really done much painting since then, though. So after I saw that barn, I started a lot of drawing — you have to be able to draw to paint. I took some workshops and practiced drawings. My main ambition was not to do this from a commercial standpoint but rather a historic preservation standpoint.”For his painting, Kroeger uses palette knives and oil paint in the oil impasto technique on canvas or Masonite panels.“Impasto oil is thick and the painting must be completed in one or two sittings, as long as the second is close behind the first,” he said. “Unlike traditional oil painting, the thickness of impasto makes the paint harden relatively quickly, meaning that the artist can’t return and continue or change it a few days or weeks later like with traditional oil.”The thick paint reflects light in different ways because it protrudes from the canvas and it can change in appearance at different times of day or in different lighting. When possible, he uses wood from the barn to frame its painted image.“I make the frame and cut the Masonite to fit the frame and paint on it. I learned how to trim the old wood, cut the rabbet, and assemble a frame and, after mistakes and incorrect measurements, I gained respect for this craft,” he said. “Since I’m trying to preserve Ohio history in this project, the barn’s own wood adds another dimension to the painting. Actually, even though it takes a long time to make a barn wood frame from rustic lumber, it gives me a lot of joy, which I didn’t expect at first.”Kroeger painted a picture of that old barn he calls Granville Gray and he has gone on to preserve many other barns through his oil-painted portraits.“My goal is to go to each of Ohio’s 88 counties, paint some barns and preserve history,” he said. “I have never been much of a history student, but I now appreciate what the pioneers in Ohio did. They were very courageous in coming out here looking for new lands. Sometimes they lived in the barn. The barn was the moneymaker so to speak. They cleverly constructed the barns using correct woods and putting up barns that hold together to this day. They knew a lot more than people today think they did. Without them we wouldn’t have Ohio. It is part of the past I’d like to preserve.”At first, Kroeger would set out into the wilds of rural Ohio searching for barns to document on his own, but found that it was not a very efficient way to operate.“I started driving around looking for barns and stopping to talk to the owners. It was difficult to do it that way and, technically, I was trespassing,” Kroeger said. “So I started to send out feelers to historic societies. Then Highland County connected me with a ‘barn scout’ — she worked for USDA and knew everyone in the northern part of the county.”It was in Highland County where Kroeger decided to add another layer to his art. He had been looking for a way he could give back to the communities he was getting to visit through his new endeavor. He decided he wanted to sell his paintings at an event in the community with a portion of the proceeds going to a local charity.“I didn’t know much about 4-H, having been a suburban kid. I went to the county fair and watched the goat show competition. I saw kids who were clean cut and wholesome-looking and they weren’t glued to their smart phones. It was like going in a time machine back to 1955 when I was kid. I decided to do it for them,” he said. “I did a dozen paintings of Highland County barns. The next spring we did a fundraiser for them and half the proceeds went to 4-H.  We raised about a third of their annual auction and it made me feel good. And, when my essays about the barns were in the local paper, people in the county found out things about their neighbors’ barns they never knew and they really enjoyed that.”He has painted between 300 and 400 barns. With some experience now, Kroeger has a fairly set process. It starts with a non-profit to benefit from the proceeds and the help of a “barn scout.”“I’ll come to your county and do paintings of your barns if there’s a person in your community, someone passionate about old barns, who can help me,” he said. “The barn scout locates about eight to 12 old barns.”The barn scout needs to:• Contact the barn owners for permission to paint a picture of the barn.• Get pictures of the barns and send them to Kroeger.• Ask the barn owners about the barn’s history or some interesting stories.• See if the barn owners can supply some wood siding.• Spend a day with Kroeger touring the county while he does sketches, takes photos and make notes.• Help identify a local charity.Kroeger especially likes barns with weathered siding, bowed roofs, warped and missing boards, and hand-hewn beams built prior to 1930.“I have learned that people love their barns and they hate to see them go. Some of them get converted to other uses but some can’t do that,” he said. “I want it to represent what the barn is. Especially if it is torn down soon after, I feel like I am preserving a memory. I love every painting that I do. I meet new people and most of the people I meet are very good, hardworking, trustworthy people. I enjoy that part of it too. But mostly, I just want to preserve these barns before they are gone.”His paintings and contact information can be found on two websites: barnart.weebly.com and robertkroeger.com.last_img read more

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Sometimes it Pays to Solve Hard Problems: CA Acquires 3Tera

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#Announcements#cloud#cloud computing mike kirkwood As ReadWriteWeb’s Richard MacManusreported in 2006, 3Tera is a company to watch: “3Tera strikes me as a company to keep an eye on – they’re tackling a complex problem and they have a lot of potential customers out there.” CA must agree. The companies have entered into a definitive agreement for CA to purchase 3Tera, adding it to CA’s growing list of cloud acquisitions.Simplifying Deployment3Tera’s focus is simplifying the deployment of environments. The tools also helps synchronize capabilities between cloud providers and so-called “private clouds” hosted inside a company’s data center.The company has a GUI based application to help visualize, manage, and deploy solutions in the cloud. This is an important thing to solve, especially if time is of the essence in getting your cloud-based application supported by your IT team, and keeping your choices open after it is deployed.The Cloud is Mainstream As self-reported by the 3Tera team in their blog, this acquisition represented cloud computing becoming mainstream in IT. CA sees a need to fill in this piece in their portfolio and IT leaders are asking for tools to deploy and manage cloud infrastructure assets. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… “We started 3Tera to radically ease the way IT deploys, maintains and scales – MANAGES – applications. Our AppLogic® cloud computing platform provides the foundation of our partners’ orchestration of cloud services for public and private clouds around the world. Today, we’re taking the next step in moving toward making cloud computing mainstream by joining CA.”It looks like cloud computing is becoming essential to the enterprise. Is it in yours? Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostinglast_img read more

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Pole vaulter, 84, sets her sights on more records

first_imgIn this Thursday, March 13, 2019 photo, Florence “Flo” Filion Meiler, an 84-year-old record-setting pole vaulter, poses while training at the University of Vermont indoor track in Burlington, Vt. Meiler is headed to the world championships in Poland. She is competing in track and field events including the long jump, 60-meter hurdles, 800-meter run and pentathlon. But she’s a shoo-in for the pole vault. (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke)BURLINGTON, Vt. — An 84-year-old pole vaulter isn’t putting her pole down anytime soon.Flo Filion Meiler left Thursday for the World Masters Athletics Championship Indoor in Poland, where she’ll compete in events including the long jump, 60-meter hurdles, 800-meter run, pentathlon and pole vault, for which she’s the shoo-in.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Colombia protesters vow new strike after talks hit snag Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles02:46Senators rally support for Robredo; laud her for accepting anti-drug post00:50Trending Articles02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss The petite, energetic woman from Shelburne, Vermont, said she feels more like 70 than nearly 85.“But you know, I do train five days a week. And when I found out I was going to compete at the worlds, I’ve been training six days a week because I knew I would really get my body in shape,” she said last week, after track and field training at the University of Vermont.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsBut she literally won’t have any competition in the pole vault in the championships, which runs March 24-31 in Torun, Poland. She is the only one registered in her age group, 80-84, for the sport, for which she set a world record at age 80. In the men’s pole vault, nine men are listed as competing in that age group.Meiler said the events she likes best are the hurdles and the pole vault — one of the more daring track and field events, in which competitors run while carrying a fiberglass or composite pole, brace it against the ground to launch themselves over a high bar, and land on a mat. “That was the beginning of my track career,” she said, standing in a room of her home, surrounded by hundreds of hanging medals. She took up pole vaulting at 65.Athletics has helped her through some hard times, she said. She and her husband adopted three children after losing two premature biological babies and a 3-year-old. Two years ago, their son died at age 51.And she desperately misses her training partner, a woman who started having health problems about five years ago and can no longer train. It’s tough to train alone, she said, and she hopes to find a new partner.“She’s incredibly serious about what she does,” said Meiler’s coach, Emmaline Berg. “She comes in early to make sure she’s warmed up enough. She goes home and stretches a lot. So she pretty much structures her entire life around being a fantastic athlete, which is remarkable at any age, let alone hers.”And it has paid off, said Berg, an assistant track coach at Vermont.Berg herself first started following Meiler 10 years ago while she was a student at Dartmouth College, watching her at the annual Dartmouth Relays.“She was like a local celebrity,” she said.Setting a record at age 80 with a 6-foot (1.8-meter) pole vault at the USA Track and Field Adirondack Championships in Albany, New York, while her husband watched, Meiler said, was one of her happiest days.“I was screaming, I was so happy,” she said.The overall world record for women’s pole vaulting is 16.6 feet (5.6 meters), according to the International Association of Athletics Federations. “You really have to work at that,” she said. “You have to have the upper core and you have to have timing, and I just love it because it’s challenging.”Meiler is used to hard work. She grew up on a dairy farm, where she helped her father with the chores, feeding the cattle and raking hay. In school, she did well at basketball, took tap and ballroom dancing, and, living near Lake Champlain, she water skied.Meiler, who worked for 30 years as a sales representative for Herbalife nutritional supplements, and her husband, Eugene, who was a military pilot and then became a financial analyst, together competed in water skiing.“Many times when I did water ski competition I was the only gal in my age group,” she said.She’s a relative newcomer to pole vaulting and track and field, overall. At age 60, she was competing in doubles tennis with her husband in a qualifying year at the Vermont Senior Games when a friend encouraged her to try the long jump because competitors were needed.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Google Philippines names new country director Bloomberg: US would benefit from more, not fewer, immigrants Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Meiler turns 85 in June, when she’ll head to the National Senior Games in New Mexico.That will put her in a new age group, in which she hopes to set even more records.Meiler’s athletic achievements are remarkable and something to be celebrated, said Dr. Michael LaMantia, director of the University of Vermont Center on Aging.Pole vaulting clearly isn’t for everyone of her age, but in general, activity should be, LaMantia said.“She can serve as a role model for other seniors,” he said.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Wintry storm delivers US travel woes before Thanksgiving James Harden scores 61 again, Rockets beat Spurs Miguel Romero Polo: Bamboo technology like no other Trump tells impeachment jokes at annual turkey pardon event View commentslast_img read more

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Enes Kanter May Be One Of The Last Players To Cash In

In the history of NBA free agency, there have been worse moves — particularly when you consider the crazy money that teams have shelled out to big men over the years. And through a certain prism (one that used to be the norm not so long ago), it even seems perfectly reasonable. But the Oklahoma City Thunder’s decision to match Portland’s maximum-level ($70 million) offer sheet to center Enes Kanter received mostly scorn from the Internet after it was announced late Sunday. At a glance, Kanter is the kind of young post player whose services teams line up around the block to pay for. The list of big men who snagged at least 15 points and 8 rebounds a game as 22-year-olds, as Kanter did last year, is littered with Hall of Famers, to say nothing of players whose numbers Kanter matched (18.7 PPG, 11.0 RPG) after a midseason trade to the Thunder. Decades ago, Kanter would have been seen as one of the league’s rising stars.Today, though, players are judged on their advanced metrics in addition to per-game averages and the eye test. And few players benefit less from this development than Kanter.Granted, it doesn’t take supercharged data to suspect Kanter of playing poor defense. He has a reputation for ineptitude at that end of the floor, and his block totals are routinely anemic. But defense is also a complex area of the game that statistics have traditionally been ill-equipped to measure accurately. And without reliable data, defensive deficiencies were easy to deny or downplay as more opinion than fact.Modern advanced stats, though, help quantify the defensive inadequacies of players such as Kanter with far greater precision than was previously possible. Without Real Plus-Minus (RPM), for instance, you wouldn’t know that Kanter had the worst on-court defensive influence of any center last season. And without SportVU player tracking data, you wouldn’t know Kanter allowed the highest field goal percentage at the rim of any qualified1Minimum 500 minutes played. big man a year ago. The recent advent of deeper NBA data has made it tougher for poor defenders to hide their shortcomings.Surprisingly (at least to me), Kanter’s offense also suffers on the sabermetric front: He doesn’t appear to help his teams score as efficiently as would be expected from his basic statistics. Only a few players have scored as much, and with as much efficiency,2As respectively measured by usage rate and true shooting percentage. as Kanter has over the past three seasons, but it doesn’t seem to matter. During Kanter’s career, his teams have scored 1.5 fewer points per 100 possessions with him on the floor than without, and — perhaps not coincidentally — he had the second-worst offensive Box Plus/Minus (BPM) of any player in the aforementioned group, and the fifth-worst offensive RPM.The single most important component of a player’s on-court offensive influence3As measured by offensive RPM. is scoring efficiency, and that’s not a trouble spot for Kanter. But even more important (when taken collectively) are a player’s assist rate and his ability to get to the line and to take 3-point shots, and Kanter sets the team back in both areas.That may not seem important because Kanter is still personally scoring points, but basketball is a tricky sport that way. The fascinating thing that happens when you search for links between component categories and overall offensive performance is that unexpected relationships fall out of the data. A player’s passing can amplify (or diminish) the potency of the threat his scoring talent represents; his ability to stretch the floor or collapse defenses into the paint can open up opportunities for teammates. Kanter’s own numbers might not be affected, but his weaknesses show up in his team’s rates of shooting efficiency, turnovers and, ultimately, offensive success.The idea of players being hollow stat-stuffers is hardly new, but the ability to quantify it with enough certainty to resist the lure of the potential “20 and 10” guy4Kanter averaged 19.6 points and 11.3 rebounds per 36 minutes last season. at the negotiating table is a novel development. Too novel, in fact, since OKC did eventually cave and match Portland’s offer to Kanter, putting the Thunder above the luxury-tax line they’d traded James Harden to avoid less than three years earlier. But if the rapid acceptance of advanced metrics is any indication, Kanter might be one of the last of his kind.In other words, don’t be surprised if the days of a player cashing in on hollow numbers are, well, numbered. read more

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Veteran Educator Community Advocate Joe Darville PMs Promise of Land a 41Year

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, February 16, 2018 – Grand Bahama – Joe Darville remembers the first time he proposed that every Bahamian be granted a plot of Crown Land at age 18.  “It was 1977 and I had just moved to Freeport to take up my post as principal of Catholic High School,” said the veteran educator and respected community rights and environmental advocate.   “The Bahamas was barreling toward a drug-involved culture. Drugs were infiltrating every level of society and I was sick about what I saw ahead – poverty, neglect, delusion, corruption, a widening gap between the haves and have-nots, a disrespect for law and order.”But Darville, ever the faith-based optimist, also saw a solution.“Make Bahamians owners of their own land and they would look after their country,” he says.   “Sixty percent of all the land in The Bahamas is Crown Land and successive governments have been trading it for a song to lure foreign direct investment.  I am not opposed to foreign investment.  We are a small nation and we need people from abroad who have vision, ideas and the wherewithal to carry them out.   But we also need to make Bahamians owners and the only way to do it for many who will not be able to afford to buy land, especially when they are young, is to offer that land as a grant and see how becoming a landowner changes people, making them stronger, more confident, more responsible.  They feel as though they belong.”Crown Land grants for Bahamians was a plea at Darville repeated for four decades, through his years as a high school principal, vice president of the Bahamas Union of Teachers, founding member and past president of the Bahamas Counselors’ Association, founding member of the Grand Bahama YMCA, chairman of the Bahamas Humane Society, more recently chairman of Save The Bays.This week, Darville heard the words he had waited half a lifetime to hear.“When the Prime Minister, Dr. Hubert Minnis announced that government would provide lots for under $30,000, a reduction of 70% of the market price, as part of its ambitious housing program and land reform initiatives, I wanted to jump up and shout congratulations.  This could be one of the most significant moves any government could ever make.  We do not know the details yet, how many lots, where they are, what size, any payment or loan arrangements so we await word on that but in principle, the move to make Crown Land available at reasonable rates to a broad base is a dramatic turn that will have tremendous positive benefits.”Darville offered two suggestions to maximize the initiative.“I would ask that the PM take into consideration the fact that even $30,000 may be out of reach for some and provide delayed payment plans or outright grants based on earning potential and individual interviews,” he said.   “I would also urge government to grant one-acre plots in the Family Islands to give recipients pride of ownership, open windows of opportunity and help revive our beautiful family islands.”The prime minister made the announcement this week during a tour of The Pointe development, Bay Street.“There are many Bahamians who want to own homes,” he said.  “Unfortunately, today, the average home may cost anywhere from $180,000 and up.  That is very cost prohibitive to the average Bahamian, and therefore we are introducing this program.  We would hope that we have lots available right after the new budget [in] May/June.  Those lots will be sold with all the infrastructure, amenities attached to it and be sold at a very, very low price.  The only thing I can say is that there’d be – I don’t want to give the exact cost – but to give you a ballpark figure, I can say they will be definitely be less than $30,000.”Darville, who has won numerous awards for civic leadership, said one of the important components of the promise of land ownership is duty exemption on construction materials for first time homeowners, predicting an economic boost for contractors.“But the most important outcome is that those who were once on the outside looking in will now feel a part of the mainstream,” he said.  “Home ownership changes how you view everything around you – your neighbours, your neighbourhood, the school in your area – they all become part of your world.  For those who have always lived behind the warm wall of wealth, it is hard to imagine how cold it is on the outside.  I commend Dr. Minnis and his team for taking this important step toward true land reform and hope that it is carried out especially in the Family Islands so young people can return to their roots and develop the land of their heritage and of their hearts.” Related Items:last_img read more

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Foreign Affairs Statement on Claims of Demonstrations Outside Bahamas Embassy Haiti

first_img Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, February 14, 2018 – Nassau – The Ministry of Foreign Affairs has taken note of the information circulating via social media that there has been a demonstration outside The Bahamas Embassy in Haiti.   The Ministry advises the general public that this information is false and that there has been no such demonstration.Furthermore, the claims that there has been an upsurge in applications for Bahamian status at the Embassy are also false.  The Ministry appreciates the public interest in these matters but reminds members of the public to be careful about accepting as true or circulating information that is unverified.Press Release: Ministry of Foreign Affairs Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

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Keep spinning the fortune roulette

first_imgThis exhibition is dedicated to Delhi Shilpi Chakra, a group which was founded in 1949 with the motto, Art Illuminates Life but has no trace now.The society, commonly known as Shilpi Chakra, played a pivotal role in emerging Indian art scenario. They had regular exhibitions, discussions, talks and active interactions between members of creative fields of visual arts, literature and music to promote budding artists during  the ’60s and ’70s.The show is being curated by Keshav Malik, who was also one of the active members of Delhi Shilpi Chakra since its inception. Artists whose work will be on display are Anupam Sud, B C Sanyal, Bimal Dasgupta, Biren Dey, Devayani Krishna, Dhanraj Bhagat, J Swaminathan, Jagadish Dey, K C Aryan, K S Kulkarni, Krishan Ahuja, Paramjeet Singh, Rajesh Mehra, Ram Kumar, Rameshwar Broota, Sailoz Mukherjea, Santosh Jain, Satish Gujral, Shobha Broota, Surendra Chopra, Umesh Chandra Varma.The highlights of this show will be a few artworks that were showcased in the very first exhibition held by the Shilpi Chakra also the copy of the only publication that was ever taken out from the time group existed.The show will be inaugurated on Sunday by the veteran members of Shilpi Chakra.last_img read more

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