The need for internationalist solidarity

first_imgAbayomi AzikiweFollowing are edited remarks delivered to the U.S. chapter conference of the International League of People’s Struggle held in Chicago on Oct. 22. Azikiwe is an internationally known anti-imperialist leader from Detroit.There is a fundamental weakness in the people’s movement in the United States, and that is the necessity for anti-imperialist internationalism.The struggles against racism, national oppression and class exploitation cannot be separated from the need to end Washington and Wall Street’s interference in the internal affairs of most states throughout the world.Winning recognition in these monumental struggles is heavily dependent upon the degree to which we can create widespread awareness of the plight of communities of color and the working class in general. There are efforts underway to achieve these objectives although much more work has to be done.International consciousness in regard to the character of the U.S. state is growing immensely. This is in part due to the mass demonstrations and urban rebellions which have sprung up by and large spontaneously in response to the vigilante death of Trayvon Martin in 2012 and the not-guilty verdict handed down in the trial of George Zimmerman.When Zimmerman’s acquittal was announced it did a great deal to turn public opinion domestically and internationally against institutions which devalue African-American life and democratic rights. It was during this period that the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter began to trend. Since then there have been efforts to build BLM chapters across the U.S., spreading internationally into Britain and Latin America.Later, on Aug. 9, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo., 18-year-old Michael Brown was gunned down by a white police officer. Immediately, demonstrations erupted in Ferguson. These manifestations spread nationally, bringing attention to the false notion that the U.S. had become a so-called post-racial society in the period following the election of President Barack Obama in 2008.No ‘post-racial’ U.S.Obama was forced to address the problems of the “special oppression” of African Americans after the unrest in Ferguson. The situation of African Americans gained international attention prompting editorials in leading periodicals both in the U.S. and internationally questioning this false assertion of post-racialism.The administration leaned in favor of maintaining the status quo of national oppression. Obama, of course, gave his view of what “African Americans feel” and then denounced violence, saying it will not accomplish anything. This is a blatant falsehood because the U.S. state was born in violence and maintains its existence through brute force and coercion inside the country and abroad.What these developments further exposed was the failure of the Obama administration to address the special oppression of African Americans while instead advancing a policy of public avoidance in the face of worsening social conditions.It was the African-American masses and other oppressed groups who suffered the brunt of the economic crisis beginning in 2007. Detroit was one of the hardest hit urban areas. When Obama came into office in 2009 there was considerable false hope that these economic difficulties would attract the attention of the White House and the then-majority Democratic House and Senate (2008-10).Subsequent rebellions and waves of mass demonstrations in the streets, campuses and now athletic fields have stripped the administration of any pretense of political legitimacy. Colin Kaepernick and others in professional, college and high school sports settings illustrate that no matter how they are classified as “privileged,” the specter of racist violence and threats from the armed agents of the state remains with them at all times. Racism is on the increase in the U.S., and the refusal of the ruling class and the capitalist state to advance any reforms in this regard speaks volumes about the current phase of imperialism and its public posture.Global implications of capitalist crisisThe degree to which the capitalist class can claim any semblance of an economic “recovery” is related to the expansion of low-wage labor and the mega-profits of transnational corporations. This is reinforced by the systematic defunding of public education, municipal services and environmental safeguards.There are examples too numerous to outline here. We could speak about the undemocratic system of emergency management and forced bankruptcy in Detroit and other Michigan cities that have majority African-American populations. There is also the water crisis in Flint and the near collapse of public schools in Detroit, Highland Park, Inkster and other Michigan cities.A nationally coordinated movement led by trade unions demanding a minimum wage of $15 an hour is growing across the country. People of all generations are working more for less money.The prison-industrial complex, now encompassing approximately 2.2 million people, with millions more under judicial and law-enforcement supervision, represents another form of super-exploitation and social containment that is connected to racial profiling and the unjust court system.These are some of the principal issues we must take up in the U.S. Our internationalism must be informed by the specific conditions of the workers and oppressed and the movements that have sprung up in the last four years.Drawing links between home and abroadPerhaps the most profound crisis of displacement today is the migration of people from North Africa into southern Europe. This movement of dislocated persons has been documented by the United Nations Refugee Agency as the largest since the conclusion of World War II. There are 60 million to 75 million people who have been internally and externally displaced in the modern world.These forced removals stem directly from the foreign policy imperatives of war and economic exploitation engineered by Washington and Wall Street. The interventions in Afghanistan, Iraq, Haiti, Libya, Syria, Yemen and Somalia are fueling underdevelopment and balkanization.Many of these wars remain largely hidden from people in the U.S. Much of the social impact of these wars of regime change and genocide are being manifested inside these geopolitical regions and in southern, central and eastern Europe.The crisis of imperialist war has its economic components. The overproduction of oil and other commodities is driving down prices and causing higher rates of joblessness, poverty, food deficits, class conflicts and civil war. Countries such as Somalia, South Africa, Zimbabwe and Nigeria, rich in natural resources, land and strategic waterways, are facing varying levels of recession, depression and further enslavement to international finance capital.Finally, it is our task to point to the direct relationship between U.S. domestic and foreign policy. A policy of national oppression inside the U.S. is reflected in the military and economic destruction of countries from the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, and extending across Africa, the Middle East, Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean.The problems we are facing in North America cannot be effectively tackled or solved independent of the people of the international community. The world’s peoples must unite in a program of anti-imperialism aimed at ending all forms of oppression and exploitation.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Students honor Kathy Griffin for her work with veterans

first_imgIn the spirit of Veterans Day, Harvard Undergraduates Honoring Veterans (HUHV) will be hosting its first-ever charity benefit, Standing Tall for Veterans, on Oct. 26 at 4 p.m. in Lecture Hall B of Harvard’s Science Center, 1 Oxford St. At the core of the event, HUHV will honor prominent stand-up comic and television personality Kathy Griffin with the inaugural Distinguished Service Partner Award.Pursuant with the objective of the event, HUHV will donate all ticket proceeds to the Home Base Program, the arm of the Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital, that provides clinical support for veterans with PTSD. At the conclusion of the event, the Red Sox Foundation will open up a silent auction of Red Sox memorabilia to the general public (no ticket required) in the arcade of the Science Center, the proceeds of which will also be donated to the Home Base Program.Tickets for the charity event go on sale Oct. 8 at the Harvard Box Office, Holyoke Center, 1350 Massachusetts Ave. A limited number of seats will be available to former and current military personnel (veterans and ROTC members) free of charge with valid identification. Harvard student tickets are $10 and general admission tickets are $15.HUHV is a student group of Harvard College dedicated to easing the transition of local veterans into civilian life, while making their stories and faces more visible among the student body.last_img read more

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Victims of Sibolga terror attack to receive Rp 1.7b in compensation

first_imgAn East Jakarta court ordered the government on Wednesday to grant financial compensation to victims of a bomb attack that occurred in a residential area of Sibolga, North Sumatra, in March 2019, a victim-protection agency has announced.The compensation totaled Rp 1.7 billion (US$124,156) for the 152 victims.  The Witness and Victim Protection Agency (LPSK) said it appreciated the verdict. LPSK deputy chair Susilaningtias said the compensation was awarded differently from other terror attack cases. Traditionally, compensation went towards repairing destroyed buildings, houses and electronics, she said.In the Sibolga case, the compensation will also cover living expenses for the victims, who have lost jobs and have suffered lasting effects from severe wounds sustained in the attacks.“Initially, it was difficult for us to list and count the victims’ financial losses. However, we eventually found a way, hence the compensation,” Susi said in a statement that was made available to The Jakarta Post on Friday.The Sibolga attack was the first case for the agency’s newly formed compensation assessment team, she added. The agency formed the team to measure and assess financial losses for victims of crime, including terrorism.“Especially in this case, the LPSK also received help from the Sibolga public works agency and the spatial agency,” said Susi.The court also handed down guilty verdicts to Rinto Sugiarto, Asmar Husin, Azmil Khiar Simanjuntak, Heryanto Chaniago, Zulkarnaen Panggabean and Rosliana for their involvement in the attack. They received various sentences, from six years to life imprisonment.Topics :last_img read more

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Giroud confident of fitness for Marseille clash

first_imgArsenal striker Olivier Giroud is confident that he will be ready to take on Marseille despite twisting his ankle against Sunderland.The France international netted after just 11 minutes at the Stadium of Light and also assisted Aaron Ramsey’s second goal in the 3-1 win but was withdrawn late on to throw his participation in Wednesday’s Champions League tie into doubt.“It is not bad. I twisted my ankle but, fortunately, it is nothing major,” Giroud told the press.“Marseille? Yes, I am OK, I will be fine.”The Gunners star had already scored three times in his opening three club games of the season before the visit to the Black Cats saw club-record signing Mesut Ozil added to the team and feels that he is in with a chance of winning the Premier League’s Golden Boot.“With this team I can score many goals,” he enthused. “Can I finish the league’s top scorer? I must have a chance.”last_img read more

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Big stars arrive for Stephen Appiah’s final farewell

first_imgCelebrated former Ghana captain Stephen Appiah will later today bring the curtain down on what has been an illustrious football career spanning two decades.Appiah, who qualified Ghana to her maiden appearance at the senior FIFA World Cup in 2006 is expected to be joined by some of the most accomplished footballers of his generation at the Accra Sports Stadium on Saturday for a farewell game.There was a colorful fund raising dinner at the Banquet Hall of the State house on Friday.Big football stars such as Yaya Toure, Samuel Eto, George Weah, Drogba, Del Piero and many others have all confirmed their participation, according to organizers of the event, Primeval Media.In a statement announcing the retirement earlier in January, Appiah said he was retiring with “a great measure of fulfillment”.He added: “I wish this day never came because football was life- my life. It made me whole.” A star studded Stephen Appiah XI made up of Richard Olele Kingson, LaryeaKingson, John Paintsil, Micheal Essien, SulleyMuntari, Didier Drogba, Yaya Toure, Samuel Eto’Ó Fils, Roberto Baggio, Nigel Dejong and George Boateng.Peter Ofori Quaye, Godwin Attram, Emmanuel Adebayor will play, too, against the Black Stars in a Testimonial match aimed at honouring Appiah after calling time off his career.In related development, rates for the game have been released. Organisers of the Stephen Appiah Testimonial Match, Primeval Media have released the rates for the match fixed for Saturday, June 27, at the Accra Sports Stadium.A statement from Communications Directorate said, the Popular Stand will go for GHS 10.00, with the Osu Stand going for GHS 20.00.According to the statement, the VIP Lower will go for GHS 30.00, whilst the VIP Upper will go for GHS 50.00 with VVIP going for GHS 100.00.The dinner Samuel Eto’o (above, pictured with Appiah) made a $50,000 donation to the Appiah Foundation at the State House during the plush dinner while Asamoah Gyan gave $60,000.Business Chedar offered 100,000 cedis ($23,000) and a younger brother of President Mahama gave 50,000 cedis ($12000).–last_img read more

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GRAND FINALS SUMMARY- QSST DOUBLE!

first_imgQSST have made it a golden day at the 2004 National 18 Years Touch Football Championships, claiming both the Mens and Womens titles. The match up of QSST and NSWCHS in the Womens grand final was highly anticipated, with NSWCHS having taken the 2003 title from QSST. Queensland were out to claim it back and opened the scoring with Emily Hopkin’s great step allowing Gemma Etheridge to cross and score. An intercept from NSW’s Tegan Considine brought the crowd to their feet, which then lifted even more as Queensland’s Teneille Shaw chased 25 metres to touch Considine. With neither team able to score for the remaining time in the first half, it was Nicole McHugh who brought NSW back to even with a touchdown to open the second half. This was as close to winning as NSW would get though, with Queensland’s captain Courtney Hipperson scoring to give her side a 2-1 lead. Belinda Hammett dived across the line for a 3-1 advantage to Queensland before the NSW side could bring it back to 3-2 with nine minutes still to play. NSW looked as though they were still in with a chance as the Queensland girls failed to make the most of their opportunities and extend their lead. When Delwyn Tupuhi and Hipperson both added to the Queensland tally, a 5-2 lead was too much for the NSW girls. With five minutes to go the NSW side also lost experienced Australian representative Kirstie Jenkins to an injury and the game was all but over. For Queensland coach Peter Bell, the win was a reward for how hard his players have worked. “They’ve put in a lot of training for this and they’re a great group of girls,” Bell said. Captain Courtney Hipperson agreed. “It feels awesome, we’ve had great teamwork and really bonded as a team, we knew we were good enough to win this and we came here to do that,” Hipperson said. In the Mens match QSST were out to defend their 2003 title and opened the scoring quickly through Lyall Darby. It was a free flowing first half, with the scores locked at 2-2 after just ten minutes of play. In the Mens grand final it was again a meeting between QSST and NSWCHS, with the Queensland Men looking to defend their 2003 title. Scoring flowed freely in the first half, with QSST beginning strongly on the back of a Lyall Darby opening touchdown and a Jerome Waitohi intercept and touchdown. NSWCHS moved into gear and the score was back to 2-2 before Queensland ran in another two touchdowns to take a 4-2 lead. Australian representative Pat Smith showed some of his classy stepping to bring NSW back to a 4-3 deficit and brought the crowd into the match. Down 5-3 at half time, NSWCHS opened the second half scoring but when Queensland replied immediately through Waitohi’s second intercept and touchdown, the score went to 6-4. NSWCHS couldn’t break through the Queensland defense again, allowing QSST to take the title with the score of 6-4. For Queensland coach Peter Robinson, the relief was obvious. “I’m really proud of the way these boys have played, they’ve had to adjust to a lot of different styles of play, it’s been a long week, but they really do deserve this,” Robinson said. “NSWCHS are a great side, they have a lot of talent and they played really well, it was a very tough week.” By Rachel Moyle, [email protected]last_img read more

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Average US mortgage rates rise 30year at 465 per cent

first_imgWASHINGTON – Long-term U.S. mortgage rates are up for the fourth consecutive week, with the key 30-year rate reaching its highest level since May.Costs for would-be homebuyers continue to climb. Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Thursday that the average rate on 30-year, fixed-rate mortgages jumped to 4.65 per cent, from 4.60 per cent last week. The average rate has increased from 3.83 per cent a year ago.The average rate on 15-year, fixed-rate loans rose to 4.11 per cent this week from 4.06 per cent last week.The primary factors driving rates higher include the strong economy, trade tensions between the U.S. and other countries, and the U.S. government stepping up sales of its debt, according to Freddie Mac chief economist Sam Khater.The expanded U.S. debt sales suppress Treasury bond prices and push their interest rates higher. The yield on the key 10-year Treasury note has been running above 3 per cent, approaching a seven-year high. The yield jumped to 3.08 per cent Wednesday, from 2.96 per cent a week earlier. It held at 3.08 per cent Thursday morning.The higher mortgage rates “represent continued affordability challenges for prospective buyers — especially first-time buyers,” Khater said.To calculate average mortgage rates, Freddie Mac surveys lenders across the country between Monday and Wednesday each week.The average doesn’t include extra fees, known as points, which most borrowers must pay to get the lowest rates.The average fee on 30-year fixed-rate mortgages was unchanged from last week at 0.5 point. The fee on 15-year mortgages also remained at 0.5 point.The average rate for five-year adjustable-rate mortgages edged down to 3.92 per cent from 3.93 per cent last week. The fee rose to 0.4 point from 0.3 point.last_img read more

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Things are going very slow as Canada Post strikes continue

first_imgCALGARY (660 NEWS) — Negotiations continue to inch along between Canada Post and the union representing its employees.The latest round of rolling strikes hit several communities in British Columbia on Monday, after previously stopping mail delivery in Calgary on October 25.This is despite the federal government appointed a special mediator to assist with the talks.“Things are going very slow, we haven’t made much progress,” said Gord Fischer, National Director for the Prairie Region of the Canadian Union of Postal Workers.Fischer thinks the mediator is doing the best job possible but blames some of the hold-up on the crown corporation.“Canada Post’s attitude in terms of dealing with (CUPW) is that they seem to be unmoving, they seem to be stubborn. This corporation is a bit of a dinosaur; it needs to move ahead, and it needs to start dealing with its worker issues.”Namely on that list of issues is health and safety, with the union saying work is precarious, dangerous and slow.“A lot of that goes with overburdening in terms of people being required to do more work than can be reasonably expected and work more hours in a day than can be expected,” said Fischer.The union is also not budging on its bread and butter: delivering traditional lettermail, even though lettermail deliveries have fallen sharply in the last few years while parcel deliveries skyrocket.“Many people still use it,” added Fischer. “They use it for a number of purposes, whether that’s businesses for billings and it’s also for people that mail each other still, believe it or not — greeting cards, that sort of thing.”But Ian Lee, an Associate Professor with the Sprott School of Business at Carleton University believes Canada Post needs to modernize into an e-commerce firm and put most of its focus on parcels. He said one issue with lettermail is the majority of people who still receive it are getting older. Lee added another problem with CUPW’s argument is the complaint about workload.“Right now, they’re waving their arms at 50,000 feet saying unfair workload, workload. And yet, you don’t hear these complaints from any other courier companies, so then the question is what are they doing differently?”Fischer said the rolling strikes would continue to be their primary strategy as the negotiations progress, but the locations where they will happen are kept a secret “because we like to catch Canada Post unprepared if we can.”But in the meantime, Fischer is still very optimistic a deal can be done, and the disruptions can stop soon.“We’d like to get back to work and get mail service back to normal for the Canadian people, and so we’re hoping that either the government or Canada Post get to the bargaining table and reach a deal quickly.”last_img read more

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British PM isolated as Brexit strategy hangs in balance

first_imgLondon: Accused of presiding over an unprecedented national humiliation in her chaotic handling of Brexit, British Prime Minister Theresa May has all but lost control of her party and her government. The Conservative leader has in the past won praise for her determination and ability to survive what has often felt like one long political crisis since the 2016 referendum vote to leave the European Union. But her approach to the endgame, refusing to accept MPs’ opposition to her divorce deal and agreeing to delay Brexit to try for a third time to get it through, has prompted frustration and anger on all sides. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from USMinisters from both the pro- and anti-Brexit camps in her cabinet have in recent weeks joined scores of Conservative MPs in defying the government in parliamentary votes. And this weekend, after yet another bruising Brussels summit for the prime minister, British newspapers were full of moves by her colleagues to oust her. In an editorial, Conservative-supporting Spectator magazine suggested May was the “worst prime minister in our history”. It condemned her “lack of imagination, inability to lead a team or solve complex problems” — although it also accused the ruling party itself for failing to find a better leader. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential pollsMay’s former director of communications, Katie Perrior, wrote in The Times newspaper that the prime minister was “a passenger at the time when the country needed a rally driver”. She backed a suggestion made by some MPs that May offer to quit if parliament backs her divorce deal, allowing someone else to lead the next stage of the EU negotiations. The top selling The Sun tabloid also embraced this plan, praising May’s “remarkable resilience in the face of repeated humiliations, but saying it was ‘time to move on’.” “She has lost the backing of much of the country and now her party,” the paper said. May took office after the 2016 referendum, and despite having campaigned to stay in the EU, embraced the cause with the mantra “Brexit means Brexit”. Her promise to leave the EU’s institutions and end free movement of workers delighted eurosceptic MPs, but caused dismay among many pro-Europeans. The splits in her Conservative party became a serious problem after a disastrous snap election in June 2017, when May lost her parliamentary majority.last_img read more

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Pope denounces ‘cruel violence’ of Sri Lanka Easter attack

first_imgVatican City: Pope Francis denounced the “cruel violence” of the Easter Sunday slaughter of Christians and foreigners in Sri Lanka as he celebrated the most joyful moment on the Christian liturgical calendar by lamenting the bloodshed and political violence afflicting many parts of the world. Francis skipped his homily during Easter Mass but delivered his traditional “Urbi et Orbi” (To the city and the world) speech highlighting conflicts in the Mideast, Africa and the Americas and demanding that political leaders put aside their differences and work instead for peace. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from US”May the one who gives us his peace end the roar of arms, both in areas of conflict and in our cities, and inspire the leaders of nations to work for an end to the arms race and the troubling spread of weaponry, especially in the economically more advanced countries,” Francis said from the loggia of St. Peter’s Basilica overlooking the flower-decked square below. In a special appeal at the end, Francis lamented the “grave attacks” on Sri Lankan hotels and churches, which occurred just as the Christian faithful were celebrating Easter Mass that marks the resurrection of Christ following his crucifixion. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential polls”I want to express my loving closeness to the Christian community, targeted while they were gathered in prayer, and all the victims of such cruel violence,” Francis said. “I entrust to the Lord all those who were tragically killed and pray for the injured and all those who are suffering as a result of this dramatic event.” More than 130 people were killed and hundreds wounded following near-simultaneous blasts at three Sri Lankan churches and three hotels frequented by foreigners. In his roundup of global conflicts, Francis warned that the world was increasingly becoming resigned to the ongoing conflict in Syria. He called for a “renewed commitment for a political solution” that would respond to Syrians’ need for freedom, peace and justice and allow for millions of refugees to return home. In Yemen, he lamented how children in particular are “exhausted by hunger and war,” while in North Africa, Libyans are enduring a fresh round of fighting between rival forces battling for control of Tripoli, the capital “I urge the parties involved to choose dialogue over force and to avoid reopening wounds left by a decade of conflicts and political instability,” he said of Libyan leaders. Francis said he hoped the political and religious leaders of South Sudan would open a “new page in the history of the country” and work for reconciliation. Francis hosted South Sudan’s president and opposition leader for a remarkable retreat at the Vatican earlier this month, during which the pope bowed down and kissed their feet, begging them to work for peace. And history’s first Latin American pope also offered prayers for Venezuelans and Nicaraguans experiencing political and economic hardship and “all those who lack the minimal conditions for leading a dignified and secure life due to a crisis that endures and worsens.” The Vatican said popes sometimes either deliver an off-the-cuff homily on Easter Sunday or skip it altogether, given the lengthy speech and blessing that follows.last_img read more

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