Plants and soil microbes respond to recent warming on the Antarctic Peninsula

first_imgAnnual temperatures on the Antarctic Peninsula, one of the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, have risen by up to 0.56°C per decade since the 1950s [1]. Terrestrial and marine organisms have shown changes in populations and distributions over this time [2 and 3], suggesting that the ecology of the Antarctic Peninsula is changing rapidly. However, these biological records are shorter in length than the meteorological data, and observed population changes cannot be securely linked to longer-term trends apparent in paleoclimate data [4]. We developed a unique time series of past moss growth and soil microbial activity from a 150-year-old moss bank at the southern limit of significant plant growth based on accumulation rates, cellulose δ13C, and fossil testate amoebae. We show that growth rates and microbial productivity have risen rapidly since the 1960s, consistent with temperature changes [5], although recently they may have stalled [2]. The recent increase in terrestrial plant growth rates and soil microbial activity are unprecedented in the last 150 years and are consistent with climate change. Future changes in terrestrial biota are likely to track projected temperature increases closely and will fundamentally change the ecology and appearance of the Antarctic Peninsula.last_img read more

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Three takeaways from Edmonton Oilers’ 6-2 victory over Anaheim Ducks

first_imgDraisaitl now leads with 34 points on the year.MORE: Connor McDavid shows off wizardry with goal vs. DucksThe 24-year-old was previously tied with David Pastrnak heading into Sunday. Pastrnak did not record a point in the Bruins’ 3-2 shootout loss to the Philadelphia Flyers, and Draisaitl was able to jump into first for the time being. He’s now on pace to finish the season with 147 points. You read that right — 147 points. No player has managed over 140 points in a season since Mario Lemieux recorded 161 in 1995-96. Here are three takeaways from the Oilers’ win.SN MAILBAG: Taylor Hall, John Carlson and the 2020 NHL DraftConnor McDavid joins the 400-club — and records a hat trickMcDavid is no stranger to milestones or high expectations, and he surpassed both with a strong performance on Sunday.The 22-year-old forward was able to score on an impressive wheel-and-deal goal — he turned on the jets and fired a quick shot past Gibson to regain the Oilers’ first-period lead, making the score 2-1. McDavid’s tally was his 400th career point.Connor McDavid, Mr. 4⃣0⃣0⃣.The 22-year-old joins the 400-point club with his third goal in four games.pic.twitter.com/vbKoVQp0wj— Sporting News Canada (@sportingnewsca) November 11, 2019With 137 goals and 263 assists, McDavid is just the seventh player in the league history to reach 400 career points before his 23rd birthday and the 13th-fastest to hit the mark (306 games).But wait — there’s more. McDavid wasn’t finished, and in the third period, the Richmond Hill, Ont. native netted a highlight-reel tally and a power-play goal for his fifth career hat trick.He also extended his point streak to four games and has a point in eight of his last nine matchups, as well as 11 goals and 30 points on the season, which ties him with David Pastrnak for second in NHL scoring.Nuge comes up hugeRyan Nugent-Hopkins has been improving his game of late. Although he already had 11 points in 18 games coming into Sunday’s matchup, he hadn’t scored a goal in 11 games. He put an end to that drought on Sunday — and in style.Just 1:28 into the game, Nugent-Hopkins picked up a loose puck behind the net that had trickled down the ice into the offensive zone, collected it then fired it past John Gibson to give the Oilers a 1-0 lead. It was his second goal of the season and would also mark his second-consecutive game with a point, as well as his fifth multi-point game of the season.Nuge 👏 is 👏 HUGE 👏pic.twitter.com/H3hTypTuB1— Sporting News Canada (@sportingnewsca) November 11, 2019He did it all again in the second period, too. With Edmonton on the power play, Nugent-Hopkins displayed great patience and vision as used Alex Chiasson as a screen and fired a clean, on-target shot that went top-shelf, left-corner to make it 3-1 for the Oilers with his second goal of the game.The 26-year-old also displayed great speed and patience with the puck and was able to generate a number of scoring chances. Nugent-Hopkins now has six points in his last six games — three of those being multi-point performances — and is on pace for 56 points, which would mark his second-consecutive 50-plus point season after he finished with 69 points last year.Leon Draisaitl reclaims NHL scoring leadYep, Draisaitl was Draisaitl on Sunday.As is most commonly the case, the German winger connected with McDavid for a goal and notched a primary assist on the play. In the second period, he had yet another helper. With that, he extended his point streak to nine games — and more importantly took the league lead in scoring with 31 points in 19 games to kick off 2019-20.He wasn’t done there; he added another assist, finding Nugent-Hopkins in the slot for his second goal of the season, while also assisting on a highlight-reel tally from Connor McDavid and his hat-trick goal minutes later for four assists on the evening. The Edmonton Oilers were in for a rough-and-tumble Pacific Division matchup in what was to be a semi-important game against the Anaheim Ducks. If the Ducks won, Anaheim would move to 21 points, three outside the Pacific Division lead. If not, Edmonton would be able to add to its lead with 26 points, which would put them ahead of second-place Calgary by five points.En route to a 6-2 victory, Connor McDavid recorded a hat trick — as well as a goal-of-the-year candidate —while Leon Draisaitl added four assists of his own. The Oilers’ PK was also solid, killing off all five of Anaheim’s power-play opportunities as Edmonton advanced to 12-5-2 on the season, and Mikko Koskinen also impressed 31 saves on 33 shots. The team is also 3-0-1 against divisional teams this season.last_img read more

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Selling Confabulation as Science

first_imgScience is supposed to be all about demonstrable proof through experiment.  Should some scientists get away with confabulation – mere storytelling?  Look at these recent headlines published on science news sites and consider whether some serious housecleaning is in order. 1.  Baby apes’ arm waving hints at origins of language:  New Scientist had no problem with the suggestion that arm waving by chimpanzees led to the Sermon on the Mount and every other great work of moral or conceptual communication. “Actions speak louder than words,” wrote Nora Schultz cheerfully, as if that justifies scientifically what she is about to say. “Baby chimps, bonobos, gorillas and orang-utans – our four closest living relatives – quickly learn to use visual gestures to get their message across, providing the latest evidence that hand waving may have been a vital first step in the development of human language.”  Then why did apes get stuck at such a simplistic vocabulary?  Michael Corballis (U of Auckland) came to the rescue with this confabulation: “I suspect apes have evolved their own idiosyncratic gestures since they diverged from hominins.” 2.  Whiskers marked milestone in evolution of mammals from reptiles:  With no evidence of a bewhiskered reptile anywhere, PhysOrg published notions coming from “research” at the University of Sheffield that whiskers led to an explosion of possibilities in the mammal world.  On what evidence is this based?  Merely that a grey short-tailed opossum “has many similarities to an early mammal that would have lived more than 125 million years ago; that is, around the same time that the evolutionary lines leading to modern rodents and marsupials diverged.”  No such mammal is found in the fossil record.  But wait: aren’t marsupials and rodents both mammals?  Where are the reptiles claimed in the headline?  “This evidence suggests that some of the first mammals may also have whisked like a modern mouse or rat, and that the appearance of moveable whiskers was pivotal in the evolution of mammals from reptiles.”  In other words, no evidence for transitional forms was presented at all – just the assumption that mammals evolved from reptiles.  And that’s not all: a “professor” piled on additional miracles: “This latest research suggests that alongside becoming warm-blooded, giving birth to live young, and having an enlarged brain, the emergence of a new tactile sense based on moveable facial whiskers was an important step along the evolutionary path to modern mammals,” said Tony Prescott.  “Although humans no longer have moveable whiskers they were a critical feature of our early mammalian ancestors.”  According to this confabulation, bearded men can only regret that they are devolved remnants of some imaginary power-whiskered reptile with a great future ahead. 3.  Seeking Alien Artifacts in the Solar System:  Astrobiology Magazine, funded by NASA, posted an interesting press release that suggests that, possibly, conceivably, there might be not not aliens (double negative intended).  That is, just because we haven’t found any alien artifacts orbiting the sun yet doesn’t necessarily mean they don’t exist.  Scientists at Penn State have concocted some kind of equation that is supposed to let them know whether we’ve looked hard enough yet.  The conclusion at this point is, “The researchers found that it is, at this point, difficult to say that there are not nonterrestrial objects in our solar system.”  Presumably it is, at this point, difficult to say that there are not angels in our solar system (insert any unknown you wish). 4.  Welcome to the multiverse:  Discover Magazine gave sprightly coverage to Caltech prof Sean Carroll, giving him free rein to describe his conversion to the multiverse religion.  “Could our universe be just one of a multitude, each with its own reality?” he asked.  “It may sound like fiction, but there is hard science behind this outlandish idea.”  The reader hunts for said hard science as he is dragged through another retelling of one of science’s favorite martyr tales, the burning at the stake of Giordano Bruno,1 as if this will provide insurance against a similar fate for Carroll for what he is about to say.  Safely inoculated against taking heat, he continues: “These days, cosmologists like me may be safer, but our ideas have grown only more radical…. Also like Bruno, cosmologists are reaching far beyond what observational evidence can tell them.”  Looking still for the “hard science” he promised, we get this line: “It is not that cosmologists are so fond of all those universes; it’s that we are fond of inflation, because inflation explains the observed properties of the cosmos with great precision. But many versions of inflation theory also predict an infinite number of universes, like it or not.”2  Adding string theory to the mix doesn’t help his case much, since both theories have no observational support.  Carroll knows this: “Even if such a theory were true, the worry goes, how would we ever know? Is it scientific to even talk about it?”  We’re like tribesmen on a cloudy planet who can’t see the stars, he explains, only our cloud is the big bang.  Imagine if everyone took his final advice: “Right now we don’t know, and that’s fine. That’s how science works; the fun questions are the ones we can’t yet answer. The proper scientific approach is to take every reasonable possibility seriously, no matter how heretical it may seem, and to work as hard as we can to match our theoretical speculations to the cold data of our experiments.”  That’s odd.  This was his first and only mention of “experiments.” 5.  Searching for the origins of life… and our future:  While presenting multiverses, why not present science as the answer to everything, past present, and future?  Why not build a cathedral to whatever evidence-free notion a scientist has to say about the really big questions?  Karen Weintraub saw no problems with this in her BBC News article about NASA’s Origins program.  If she’s right, there is no limit to anything scientists want to say about anything.  Her hero is Professor Dimitar Sasselov of Harvard, head of a project called “Origins of Life.”  Even though he knows it is unlikely anyone will solve the origin of life for a century or more, he believes he is preaching science.  He even prophesies: “One morning we’ll wake up with a fundamentally different view of the world and who we are.”  Other players enter Hollywood-alien-decorated article as Weintraub asks, “What is life?” and other big questions, sans evidence.  But evidence is not needed if you can assert something and back it up with an appeal to authority.  “Lawrence Krauss, a physicist who leads the Origins Project at Arizona State University, says trying to figure out how the universe came from nothing doesn’t tread on religious ground, either – at least no more than Copernicus and Darwin did.”  If some technological spinoff comes from all this “pure science” that Weintraub claims is happening thanks to taxpayer dollars, won’t it be worth it?  Her last paragraph lets the cat out of the bag: “Instead of building the metaphorical buildings that most three-year scientific grants afford today, he [John Sutherland, molecular biologist] says, the Origins researchers are constructing a cathedral. It may take them a century to find answers, but what they build will still be standing in a millennium.”  Yes, there will be pay day, someday, in the sweet by and by.  Keep those offering plates coming. 1. Giordano Bruno (1548-1600) was not burned at the stake for embracing Copernicanism or positing a multiplicity of worlds, but for advocating multiple heresies against the Catholic teachings, dabbling in magic, and espousing weird beliefs such as transmigration of souls into animals.  Regrettable as his execution was, the myth that Bruno was a martyr to science was first proposed in the 19th century by Andrew Dickson White, whose “warfare hypothesis” pitting science against religion has since been roundly criticized by historians of science.  For example, see Maya Bohnhoff’s blog entry on Common Ground Group.  Even Wikipedia downplays the notion that Bruno was a martyr to science. 2. Inflation is neither an observation nor confirmation of big-bang cosmology, but instead, was an ad hoc proposal by Alan Guth in the 1980s to overcome serious flaws in the standard big bang model. Since then, his theory-rescue device has taken on a life of its own, with other cosmologists offering even more outlandish models, each unobservable and untestable. See 9/29/2009, 2/21/2005, also 10/6/2004. Oh, what tangled webs of belief science weaved, when Darwin first let the confabulators in to deceive (12/22/2003 commentary).  The scientists in the stories above are not dumb.  They had to show a pretty high level of intelligence (or parental money, or a good advisor) to get through the rigors of a PhD program.  But is a PhD credential a license to say anything?  There are PhD’s in other fields, too (history, philosophy, theology) who have just as much knowledge and intelligence, and who exhibit far better integrity and exercise far more rigor in their research than the storytellers above. Out of their own mouths they condemned themselves as con artists and false prophets, offering some kind of enlightenment they can’t describe that may take a century to get here, long after current taxpayers are dead. You wouldn’t fall for a snake oil salesman making a promise like that.  Why take it from a so-called scientist?  Out of their own mouths they condemned themselves as priests of a gnostic religion, divining visions of emanations from other universes, or visions of mythical transitional animals their religion requires.  You wouldn’t fall for a mystery religion that taught things like that; why take it from a so-called scientist? Out of their own mouths they condemned themselves as manipulators, taking the public as dupes and fools by associating chimpanzee arm-waving with Newton’s Principia.  You wouldn’t take that kind of ridicule from anyone; why allow it from a so-called scientist?  If we can take Carroll at his word, “the fun questions are the ones science can’t answer, so the only reasonable approach is to take every reasonable possibility seriously, no matter how heretical it may seem” – such as the reasonable possibility that the so-called scientists and so-called reporters above are all nuts. This kind of unmitigated evidence-free garbage spews non-stop from the sewer pipes of science news outlets, alongside the clean, healthy fare.  It’s like having a kitchen sink with knobs for hot water, cold water, and sewage, the sewage turning on by default any time you turn on the other knobs.  The clean water taps represent science that is observable, testable, and repeatable – the kind of science we learned as children, the kind we were led to believe represented the practices and ideals of all who wore the proud label “scientist.”  The sewage is sent across the internet pipes unfiltered, requiring the consumer to turn it off. It’s a deplorable situation.  It started with Darwin and his X-men, who were determined to (1) substitute naturalism for design, and (2) make confabulation permissible in science.  If scientists were required to shut up unless they had something observable, testable and repeatable to say, the sewage pipes would shut off.  Don’t count on it.  There’s too much momentum and money involved.  The naturalistic web of belief is now made of steel girders with battleship-heavy chains, able to absorb the shocks of any falsifying evidence.  All we can do is hope that the confabulators have some conscience left, so that when publicly shamed, they might repent.  Reward those researchers who stick to the classical standards for science.  Train the young to appreciate real science but to deplore the deceitful interlopers.  Vote wisely.  Speak out.  And reach your network with the truth, one soul at a time.(Visited 22 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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World’s Fastest Supercomputer, Brought to You By Game Tech

first_imgTitan, the supercomputer introduced by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL), is on track to be the world’s fastest. At least until the next one comes along. It can handle over 20,000 trillion calculations a second. That’s the equivalent of seven billion people carrying out three million calculations per second. You know what it has to thank for all that power? Computer gaming. The graphics processing units (GPUs), usually reserved for consumer and entertainment purposes are the same ones that fuel a machine that could potentially save the world.  No exaggeration: Titan is capable of everything from predicting climate change and weather events (including monstrous hurricanes) to finding cures for Parkinson’s and cancer. All because of the same little processor that makes Call of Duty look so realistic. Faster, Better, Stronger Compared to its predecessor, Jaguar, Titan is faster and 10-times more powerful, while taking up no more physical space. (It does consume about two megawatts more energy). Inside the Titan reside thousands of NVIDIA’s latest GPU accelerator, the Tesla K20. Each of the computer’s 18,688 nodes holds one of these GPUs as well as a 16-core AMD Opteron central processing unit (CPU). Researchers at NVIDIA found that the processors they created were starting to resemble the ones used for simulating physics. The rapid-fire calculation solving done by GPUs resembled the way supercomputers simulated problems using CPUs. By combining the two, the CPU is able to handle creating the problem, or simulation, while the GPU is what does the heavy calculations. This makes complex calculations happen faster and allows them to cover more scientific ground. Added bonus? Combining the industry standard CPU with a high performance graphics processor not only makes the supercomputer faster, it also makes it more energy-efficient. Wait, what? It uses more power, how is that more energy efficient?Power consumption is a big deal for supercomputers these days, and according to Jeff Nichols, associate laboratory director for computing and computational sciences at ORNL, GPU’s could hold the key to improving that. “Combining GPUs and CPUs in a single system requires less power than CPUs alone and is a responsible move toward lowering our carbon footprint.” While the Titan consumes enough energy to power a small town, one GPU uses eight times less energy per calculation than a CPU. Titan’s size and power makes the uptick in energy usage well worth it, it does more with less energy than a supercomputer of the same size running on the standard method of CPU-only use would. Skeptics Be Damned Steve Scott, CTO of NVIDIA’s Tesla business unit told the Washington Post that this isn’t the first time CPUs and GPUs have been combined, and that a lot of people didn’t think it would make much of a difference. The size and scale of the Titan project made the stakes that much higher: the new supercomputer had to be able to handle six applications in tough areas of research including astrophysics, biofuels and nuclear energy. Scott wanted to prove using GPUs in supercomputers wasn’t a stunt. If people see it that way now, at least it’s one that worked. The goal wasn’t just to create the biggest and baddest supercomputer, it was also to create a new standard. Building a supercomputer using components that many people use to play games shows just how far consumer technology has come – remaking not just business tech but also the even-more-complex world of research technology. Image Credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory . Related Posts christina ortiz 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? Why You Love Online Quizzes Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoidlast_img read more

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10 months agoAlaba backing Bayern Munich move for Atletico Madrid defender Lucas

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Alaba backing Bayern Munich move for Atletico Madrid defender Lucasby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBayern Munich wing-back David Alaba is backing their move for Atletico Madrid defender Lucas Hernandez.Even though Alaba plays at left-back, a position where the France international could earn minutes, the Austrian would be keen to see him sign.”He is certainly a good player,” he told BILD.”If he wasn’t then Bayern wouldn’t be interested in him.”I am sure he would be capable of helping us.”Addressing the potential competition for left-back minutes that this signing could provoke, Alaba explained that he isn’t worried.”I know that left-back works for me, but at this time I wouldn’t be worried about changing to a midfield position,” he stated. last_img read more

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15 days agoWolves rival Aston Villa for Bolton Wanderers whizkid Dennis Politic

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Wolves rival Aston Villa for Bolton Wanderers whizkid Dennis Politicby Paul Vegas15 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveWolves have joined Aston Villa in the race for Bolton Wanderers whizkid Dennis Politic.The 19-year-old has alerted scouts from both clubs with his performances for the League One club this season.Football Insider says Wolves are compiling a dossier on the winger as they weigh up their options for the January transfer market.The Romania youth international has been fast-tracked into the first-team after spending most of last season on loan at Salford City. last_img read more

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7 days agoNapoli president De Laurentiis open to re-signing Higuain

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Napoli president De Laurentiis open to re-signing Higuainby Carlos Volcano7 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveNapoli president Aurelio De Laurentiis says he’d be prepared to re-sign Gonzalo Higuain.Back with Juventus after a six month loan spell with Chelsea, Higuain has hit the ground running under former Napoli coach Maurizio Sarri.De Laurentiis said: “Sarri has many positive sides and some that are negative. In England he has improved, Juve has different dressing room dynamics from ours. “Higuain? If (Carlo) Ancelotti asked me, I would say why not…?” He added: “Against Liverpool, I saw the real Napoli.” last_img read more

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Photo: Florida State WR Travis Rudolph Had Lunch With Boy With Autism So He Wouldn’t Eat Alone

first_imgFlorida State's Travis Rudolph eats lunch with a young autistic fan.Facebook/Leah PaskeTravis Rudolph, a wide receiver for the Florida State Seminoles, made the day of a young fan and his mother.During a visit to a local middle school, Rudolph sat down to eat lunch with a student with autism, so that he wouldn’t have to eat alone.Leah Paske, the boy’s mother, received a picture of the gesture, and penned an amazingly heartwarming Facebook post thanking him. It is absolutely worth a read. The full text of the post:Several times lately I have tried to remember my time in middle school, did I like all my teachers, do I even remember them? Did I have many friends? Did I sit with anyone at lunch? Just how mean were kids really? I remember one kid on the bus called me “Tammy Fay Baker” bc I started awkwardly wearing eye liner in the sixth grade, I remember being tough and calling him a silly name back, but when he couldn’t see me anymore I cried. I do remember middle school being scary, and hard. Now that I have a child starting middle school, I have feelings of anxiety for him, and they can be overwhelming if I let them. Sometimes I’m grateful for his autism. That may sound like a terrible thing to say, but in some ways I think, I hope, it shields him. He doesn’t seem to notice when people stare at him when he flaps his hands. He doesn’t seem to notice that he doesn’t get invited to birthday parties anymore. And he doesn’t seem to mind if he eats lunch alone. It’s one of my daily questions for him. Was there a time today you felt sad? Who did you eat lunch with today? Sometimes the answer is a classmate, but most days it’s nobody. Those are the days I feel sad for him, but he doesn’t seem to mind. He is a super sweet child, who always has a smile and hug for everyone he meets. A friend of mine sent this beautiful picture to me today and when I saw it with the caption “Travis Rudolph is eating lunch with your son” I replied “who is that?” He said “FSU football player”, then I had tears streaming down my face. Travis Rudolph, a wide receiver at Florida State, and several other FSU players visited my sons school today. I’m not sure what exactly made this incredibly kind man share a lunch table with my son, but I’m happy to say that it will not soon be forgotten. This is one day I didn’t have to worry if my sweet boy ate lunch alone, because he sat across from someone who is a hero in many eyes. Travis Rudolph thank you so much, you made this momma exceedingly happy, and have made us fans for life! #travisrudolph #gonoles#FSU #autismmom #fansforlifeRudolph was showed the post before practice, and his reaction was fantastic as well.Just spoke with #FSU WR Travis Rudolph. He told me he read the mother’s post before practice and that it nearly brought tears to his eyes.— Kenny Morales (@KennyMoralesTV) August 30, 2016Travis Rudolph: “He’s a cool person, I’ll hang out with him any day. And for the mom, if he needs my (cell) number, he can get it.” #FSU— Kenny Morales (@KennyMoralesTV) August 30, 2016Unfortunately, we have to deal with a lot of horrible issues in covering college football, often on a daily basis. It makes it far easier to know that the vast majority of players, like Travis Rudolph, are legitimately good people, and prove it with their actions off the field.[CBS Sports]last_img read more

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Man celebrated as a hero after saving lives in tragic BC house

first_imgAPTN National NewsIn British Columbia a tragic house fire in surrey claimed the life of an elderly woman.But if it weren’t for the quick actions of one man more may have died.Now they’re calling Trevor Yellowbird a hero.APTN’s Tina House has this story.last_img

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