At The Drive-In Releases “Governed By Contagions”, Their First New Song In 16 Years

first_imgPost-hardcore legends At The Drive-In have officially released their first new song in 16 years. The new track, “Governed By Contagions”, comes from their forthcoming album, which will be released at some point in 2017. The track features the guitar fireworks that we’ve come to expect from Omar Rodriguez Lopez, pulsating drums, and the incredible vocal range of Cedric Bixler-Zavala, who seems to be all-systems-go after his vocal chord injury earlier this year that forced the band to cancel several of their comeback shows.Listen to “Governed By Contagions” below! We’ll provide more information on the new At The Drive-In album as it’s announced.last_img read more

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Weather doesn’t affect ice cream consumption

first_imgEven with the changeable New England temperatures going up and down like a seesaw, few can forget the recent climb to a smoldering 102 degrees Fahrenheit. Frozen treats were one form of relief from the omnipresent heat, and the Harvard community sought them out wherever they could be found.In the summer, Annenberg Hall is the only place on campus where students can indulge in soft-serve frozen yogurt from 5:15 to 7:15 p.m. (During the academic year, all the dining halls serve it up.)“Students really love it,” says Martin Breslin, director for Culinary Operations at Harvard University Dining Services (HUDS), noting that vanilla is the most popular flavor, although the selection can range from graham cracker pie to cookies and cream to red velvet cake. Frozen yogurt makes way for the real thing on Sundays, when an ice cream sundae bar serves up Richardson’s ice cream with a full complement of toppings. And for those with delicate constitutions, frozen lactose-, dairy-, or soy-free alternatives are available upon request.But since none of the campus retail locations sell ice cream, many Harvard folk venture into the Square to satisfy their cravings. J.P. Licks, Pinkberry, BerryLine, and Yogurtland are all just steps away, as are Ben & Jerry’s and Lizzy’s.  And while a lot of ice cream and frozen yogurt is consumed on the hot, sunny days of summer, according to Breslin, consumption on campus is high year-round, with an increase during exam time.Bob Florio has worked at J.P. Licks for six years, and said it’s busiest in May, at the end of July, and August. Oreo cake batter is the store’s most popular flavor, and fudge the most popular topping. “We have the best fudge topping,” Florio said. He added that it’s busy all year, and people still order ice cream when it’s 10 degrees below zero outside.As July — National Ice Cream Month — winds down, the National Weather Service shows Cambridge’s temperatures going back up, so chances are you’ll find someone from the Harvard community dipping into a frozen delight.  For Harvard University Information Technology’s Jaime Bermudez it will be frozen yogurt, because it’s “healthier than ice cream,” he said as he topped off a cup with Cap’n Crunch at Yogurtland.Taylor Reiter ’15, who visits Yogurtland (or BerryLine, and sometimes Pinkberry) two to three times a week, said she loves a plain flavor with chocolate chips, or cookies and cream.Ali Almossawi, a former research associate at Harvard Business School who was back in town for a conference, had already been to J.P. Licks twice during his stay. “I miss it,” he said over a cup of chocolate brownie ice cream, confessing that he’d probably be back a few more times before he returns to San Francisco on Monday.last_img read more

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Thanks for laugh on crack article headline

first_imgThank you for the wonderful laugh this morning [Nov. 11] when we read our Daily Gazette. The headline, “Man allegedly hid crack in underwear,” brought tears to our eyes as my husband quipped, “Where else would he keep it?”Cherly MacNeilRandy MacNeilScotiaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsSchenectady teens accused of Scotia auto theft, chase; Ended in Clifton Park crash, Saratoga Sheriff… Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

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Fixture headache following sporting cancellations

first_imgPhoto © Tipp FM It’s a white out for sports fixtures across the County this weekend with all scheduled games now cancelled.Tipp’s National Hurling and Football League double header at Semple Stadium on Sunday is among the many sporting fixtures hit by the weather.All Tipperary County Hurling League games fixed for this weekend have been postponed – these will be rescheduled by County CCC next Monday night. All local soccer and rugby fixtures are also cancelled.Tipp FM Sports Editor Stephen Gleeson says while this weekend is a write off, next weekend will prove busy as games will need to be played.last_img read more

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BOXING: A Neglected Sport

first_imgOne of Liberia’s minor sports, boxing, is suffering from what a boxing fan told me, an Ebola virus.He said for boxing to survive, it might need a concerted effort to set things straight.“When was the last time you heard of a boxing bout in this country?” he said. “I bet you cannot find the date, eh?”A visit at the headquarters of the Liberia Boxing Association, right by the Sports Commission, on Broad Street yesterday afternoon did not reveal much for aspiring boxers to hope for.Two young kids were warming up in front of a mirror; a boxer was relaxing on a chair and a young woman was jumping rope, perhaps to put control her weight.“We don’t even have a ring to engage in boxing,” the boxer, said. “Boxing is just suffering if not already dead in Liberia.”Perhaps so, but what he did not know is that boxing is among the minor sports that has suffered from government and corporate support.“Over a year ago,” the boxer said, “we had a ring that we mounted at the Sports Commission for our activities.”That was in fact more than two years ago. Now there is no ring and despite the interest of few young people for the sport, there is nothing suggesting a future for the boxing.And yet, “We want to participate in the African Youth Championship in Botswana,” he said.He admitted to the Daily Observer that without intensive local training and bouts to test a boxer’s readiness for competition, it does not make much sense to send a team of Liberian ‘boxers’ to represent the country abroad.“It is not done that way,” he said, “but we don’t have a way out of it.” That hopeless admission was the struggle the late boxing legend, Baby Joe Boker, carried many years without success.“The best support for boxing has always come from the Liberia National Olympic Committee,” said a knowledgeable boxing fan. “Which were periodic seminars that were never complemented by the Liberia Boxing Association due to poor management.”The Daily Observer learned yesterday that interested boxers, ages from 15-18 are being trained at its gym, near the Sports Commission; it does not suggest that the sport will receive any revival in the near future.“Without a ring and other materials that make the sport attractive,” the boxer said, “let’s consider boxing is dead for now.”It is also sad that Liberian boxing does not have any heroes, and there is no record about those who succeeded in life through boxing.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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