The Cranberries Share Animated Music Video For “All Over Now” [Watch]

first_imgEarlier this year, Irish alt-rock heroes The Cranberries announced their plans to release a final album, In The End, featuring their late singer, Dolores O’Riordan, who died suddenly at age 46 in January 2018. The lead single from their forthcoming final studio album, “All Over Now”, was also shared with the announcement. On Wednesday, the band took the next step in what will be their final album cycle under The Cranberries banner by debuting their new animated music video for the recently-released song.The video features animation and creative direction from artist Daniel Britt, whose past work includes contributions to that epic LSD-inspired music video for Adult Swim‘s Rick and Morty. The video’s storyline follows an animated young lady, who could be considered to be a fictional nod to the band’s beloved late singer. Viewers follow the character through a rainy, dismal landscape, which somewhat mirrors the song’s lyrical themes of domestic abuse. It’s worth noting that even with the abundance of darker themes presented throughout the video, the lead character does find solace through the light from a seaside lighthouse by the end. Fans can watch the new video below.The Cranberries – “All Over Now”[Video: TheCranberriesTV]“We thought animation was the way to go — it was either that or have actors in the video,” guitarist Noel Hogan said of the video. “But animation is something we’d never really done, so we thought it would be nice.”Hogan also went on to admit that the band’s label continues to push for more music videos behind the upcoming album, much to the chagrin of the band. Discussions on the potential for another video for the album’s next single, “Wake Me When It’s Over”, are ongoing.“The record company is really kind of pushing for a mix of old footage of us,” Hogan continued. “I don’t know if that’s something we want to do. We kind of feel a video should in some way represent the song more so than be just a bunch of clips that look nice. It’s kind of an ongoing discussion at the moment.”The Cranberries will plan on disbanding entirely following the release of In The End on April 26th via BMG.last_img read more

See More

‘Sexuality’ irrelevant in Diversity Survey

first_imgThe New Zealand Diversity Survey: Findings from the first four quartersReport to EEO Trust by NZ Work Research Institute 22 October 2014This reports overviews findings from the New Zealand Diversity Survey (NZDS) for the four quarterly analyses, undertaken between November 2013 and August 2014. Across the four iterations of the NZDS, the respondent population (which varied between 1468 and 750) was reasonably consistent in terms of organisation size and industry sector, and in terms of the overall survey findings.The diversity issues most commonly perceived by respondents as most important to their organisation were wellbeing/wellness, aging workforce and flexibility. Other issues of concern were bias, ethnicity, gender, bullying and harassment, and employment transition for younger staff.The diversity issues least commonly reported as most important were disability, sexuality and religion. For all issues, apart from flexibility and employment transition for youth, the likelihood of the issue being perceived as important increases as organisation size increases.Flexible work arrangements offered to staff included teleworking, with approximately 60% of respondents’ organisations having staff that telework at least 1 day per week. Around half of respondents’ organisations have programmes to encourage valuable staff who take parental leave to return to work, with medium sized and large organisations being more likely to do this than their smaller counterparts.Respondents’ organisations appear cognisant of the increasing need to engage older workers in the workforce, with just over half of respondents’ organisations encouraging the recruitment of workers over the age of 55 years. This practice appears to be independent of organisation size.Nearly one-third of respondents’ organisations had reported incidents of bullying or harassment in the previous 12 months. Bullying or harassment reporting appears to be more prevalent in large organisations.last_img read more

See More