Jack White Plays Surprise Concert At D.C. High School

first_imgJack White swung through Washington, D.C., for a two-show run on Wednesday and Thursday. Well, make that a three-show run.In between gigs at The Anthem, the rock icon stopped by D.C.’s Woodrow Wilson High School for an unannounced set during the students’ lunch break. While the performance may have been a surprise for these incredibly lucky teenagers, Relix reports that White cleared the stunt with the school’s principal, who couldn’t say no to the proposition.According to the school’s newspaper, this is how it all went down:Most days, Wilson students pour out of class after fourth period and shuffle down packed stairwells to the atrium, where they settle in for lunch or head off campus to get food. Assistant Principal Gregory Bargeman usually plays ‘80s hits from a speaker; once in a while, a few kids get up and dance.Today, the second floor was rattling after fourth period. Noise echoed through hallways and drowned out conversations close to the atrium. In the art wing on the other side of the school, people speculated that Bargeman must have ramped up his sound system.But it wasn’t Bargeman. It was Jack White shredding a blue electric guitar, backed by a barefoot drummer, two musicians playing multi-level synths, and a bassist.Evidently, the 12-time Grammy winner treated the students—who, as we may have mentioned earlier, were really, really lucky—to a set that included favorites like “The Same Boy You’ve Always Known”, “Over and Over and Over”, and show-closing rendition of “Seven Nation Army” that turned into a singalong as the students rushed the “stage”.White is currently on tour in support of his new album, Boarding House Reach. His next stop will be a headlining performance at the Governor’s Ball Music Festival in New York City on Friday, June 1st.Jack White’s “Seven Nation Army” finale at Woodrow Wilson High Schoollast_img read more

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Luke Shaw wants embattled Premier League season cancelled

first_img Paul Pogba could not agree less with the importance of fans to the game insisting that they form part of the fun and part of the competition “I think the sport is for fans really, do you know what I mean? “I think if you don’t have fans, and you don’t play in front of fans, it just doesn’t feel right. “Especially on matchday the fans are always amazing and always help the team. “Whether it’s home or even away, our fans are always brilliant and I feel like they’re always there with us,”he enthused Although Shaw is sure to get a lot of pebbles thrown his way following his call, he is however not the only one calling for the cancellation.  Former Liverpool ace Joe Cole is equally saying it is either we are ready to play and conclude the league or axe it period. Read AlsoPremier League season suspended indefinitely after crisis talks “Obviously we need to finish the season as soon as we can, if we’re allowed to. That would be ideal,” former Liverpool man Joe Cole told the Daily Star. “If we can’t finish the season, and it’s getting close to the following season, the only situation which I think is fair is to just restart it. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted ContentBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of AnimeThe New Lara Croft Will Really Surprise You6 Ridiculous Health Myths That Are Actually TrueUse Your Zodiac Signs To Find A Perfect JobPortuguese Street Artist Creates Hyper-Realistic 3D GraffitiWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?7 Mind-Boggling Facts About Black Holes27 Animals That Don’t Need Color To Be Cool2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This YearSome Impressive And Almost Shocking Robots That ExistWho’s The Best Car Manufacturer Of All Time? Manchester United full-back Luke Shaw wants the Premier League season to be scrapped and started from scratch if future games cannot be played due to the coronavirus pandemic. Table toppers Liverpool though standing 25 points clear of closest contenders Manchester city, they have 9 matches pending to properly seal victory. Football remains suspended indefinitely due to the Covid-19 virus, which continues to wreak havoc across the globe. We either finish the season or start from the scratch says Luke shaw While many have been cautious calling for outright cancellation and hoping that the coast will be clear to round up the season, Shaw thinks the waiting game is stretching rather too long and pointing to the possibility of not finishing the matches. “Scrap it and start again. Start it again, yeah,” he said during a Combat Corona Twitch FIFA competition. The Daily Mirror understand Premier League chiefs are in talks with the government over potentially playing games behind closed doors in June. But that is not a good one as well according to Shaw who insists it has to be in front of supporters if it is to be counted as real competition. “Fans are so important. You realise it even more [now],” he added.center_img Loading… last_img read more

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McCleary: Hack believed in himself when it made sense not to, and would do it again

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ MINEOLA, N.Y. — My role had become far too embarrassing to just sit around. It was my senior year of high school, the season-opener of my varsity basketball season, and there I was — still in that same spot on the bench I’d occupied the past year.As a junior, life as a benchwarmer didn’t suck: We could joke around without fear of embarrassing ourselves in the game. But being the senior benchwarmer wasn’t as funny. My coach still didn’t like me, and I was convinced it was for some other reason than my basketball skills.Perhaps that’s why I was so excited when I heard my name called midway through the first quarter. “Mike!” my coach yelled. I popped from my chair. Why was I going into the game? I had no freakin’ clue. But perhaps my coach had adopted my way of thinking.I looked to my right and met my coach’s eye, to see who he wanted me to take out of the game. But when he looked over his eyes widened. The buzzer at the scorer’s table blared. The referee ushered me into the game. Only then I realized what I had done and my coach knew he couldn’t stop me. The “Mike” he wanted to get the attention of wasn’t me, but another player. Who was already on the court. So began the most embarrassing 12 seconds of my life, as I ran from end to end twice, fouled an opposing player and plodded back to my seat on the bench.My nightmare probably isn’t the same as yours, but then again, maybe it is. Believing in yourself takes courage, and sometimes it backfires. We all have experienced situations where we were wrong about ourselves. We have times — like when I thought I went from layup line rebounder to team savior — we were publicly wrong, too. It’s called being naive, and that’s part of being young.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textWhen I came to Syracuse, I was dead set on becoming a journalist. Yet my career hadn’t gotten off to quite the scorching start I projected in the bubble of my own mind. It took me months to get a story, no one came to me with big ideas to work on or cared about my opinions when I thought I came up with some of my own. I implied to my friends that people just “keep kicking dirt in my face.” They laughed at me, and I deserved it.Some truths have to be learned. This story doesn’t end with me rising above my high school coach’s expectations and venturing to the NBA. But being wrong about my ability as a journalist was perhaps the only reason I stuck with it. And for that reason, I was wrong a few more times: that I couldn’t make friends, that I couldn’t fall in love, that my experience couldn’t possibly get better.Keeping blind faith through early failures at The D.O. helped me improve, and now three years later I’m writing a final column many probably expected I wouldn’t. Everyone needs someone who can be a supportive voice for them, and perhaps we can start with ourselves.It took me a while to clear that night in senior year of high school out of my mind, the night I felt like more of a loser than ever. As we headed into the halftime locker room, I was mortified and felt some sort of impulsion to apologize to the kid I took out of the game. Then a teammate approached me wearing a mischievous grin.“My man,” he said and offered his hand in joking congratulation. He hadn’t played, either. “Maybe I should be like McCleary. Check myself into the game.” The team laughed.Yeah, I thought. This is funny. And maybe I could even pretend it was cool. Like… I went for it. I got in the game and my coach didn’t even have a say. It wasn’t the last time believing in myself embarrassed me, but I always learned something new.And, the next time my coach called for “Mike,” I remembered what I probably should have in that embarrassing moment: They called me “McCleary.”Michael McCleary was a senior staff writer for The Daily Orange, where his column will no longer appear. He can be reached at [email protected] and on Twitter @mikejmccleary.– 30 – Comments Published on April 26, 2020 at 12:08 amlast_img read more

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