Watch David Crosby’s Full Tour Closer At The Cap [Pro-Shot Video]

first_imgOn Saturday, David Crosby, founding member of Crosby, Stills & Nash and the Byrds, wrapped up his tour at Port Chester, NY’s Capitol Theatre with The Lighthouse Band, which features Snarky Puppy’s Michael League, Becca Stevens, and Michelle Willis. Following the release of their debut album together, Lighthouse, David Crosby & The Lighthouse Band released a second record, Here If You Listen, earlier this fall.David Crosby & the Lighthouse Band worked through many of the tracks off their new album, as well as Crosby’s “Regina”, and a handful of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young favorites, including “Guinnevere,” “Carry Me,” “Déjà Vu” and the encore closer, “Ohio”.You can watch pro-shot video of the entirety of David Crosby & the Lighthouse Band’s tour closer below:David Crosby & the Lighthouse Band – 12/8/2018 [Full-Show Pro-Shot Video][Video:Relix]Setlist: David Crosby & the Lighthouse Band | The Capitol Theatre | Port Chester, NY | 12/8/2018Set One: The Us Below, Things We Do For Love, 1974, Vagrants of Venice, Regina, Laughing, What Are Their Names, Other Half Rule, By the Light of Common DaySet Two: Glory, The City, Look in Their Eyes, Guinnevere, Janet, Carry Me, Déjà VuEncore: Woodstock, Ohio[H/T Jambands.com]last_img read more

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Wellington City Council forum: John Tracy

first_imgby Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — John Tracy is a Wellington City Council challenger (and a former council member) running for one of six “at large” positions on the newly restructured board.Registered voters within the Wellington city limits can vote in this race which will have 15 candidates on the ballot. The top three vote-getters will receive four-year terms. The second three will receive two-year terms.Voters can vote for up to six candidates. They can vote for one candidate, two candidates, three, four, five or six – but nothing more.The city/school election will be held on Tuesday, April 2. Polls open at 7 a.m. and close at 7 p.m. at the Raymond Frye Complex. People can also advance vote at the Sumner County Clerk’s office.The following is a list of questions submitted to Tracy.1. Tell us about yourself.Tracy: Aside from jobs I’ve had in high school and pre-high school, I started on the Wellington Fire/EMS Department just three months after graduating from high school.  I served the City from 1977 to 1995 where I rose to the rank of Asst. Fire Chief.  Since 1995, I’ve been employed with Sumner County and serve as the Asst. 911 Director.While on the City, I received numerous awards and commendations including the A.B. Preston Distinguished Service Award, the Employee Teamwork Award, and was nominated for the Customer Service Award.  While a firefighter, I held a part-time job with the Wellington Parks Department for two or three years.  I also served four terms on the Wellington City Council from 2004 to 2012.  My entire adult life has been in public service. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments 8. Do you believe in tax incentives to lure in private business? If so or not, please explain.Tracy: If we are meeting the needs of existing businesses and helping them sustain, then I have no problem in providing tax incentives to lure in private business.  But to expend resources to lure in one business, while another business goes under, does not gain any ground.  Also regarding development, recruit businesses to fill in the voids in Wellington.Every time we extend infrastructure (water, sewer, roads, and electric) to find a new place for a new business, we add water lines, sewer lines, roads, and electric lines that will need to be maintained.  We are having a difficult time maintaining what we have now…should we add to it? 9. The Wellington utility rates continue to be a concern to many citizens, especially the fuel adjustment rates. Do you believe they are reasonable and in line with other communities? Should the city make a change in the way it handles utilities? Tracy: There are communities with higher utility rates and there are communities with lower utility rates.  I do not believe we can focus on only one thing.  For example, a community with higher utility rates may have lower taxes, and a community with lower utility rates may have higher taxes.  You really have to look at the total cost of living and the quality of life in order to compare apples to apples.The Utility Fund is comprised of both electric and water sales.  If the Utility Fund is prospering because of water sales, I cannot justify raising electric rates simply because the electric side in making a minimal profit, and vice versa.  If the entire Utility Fund is struggling, then I can justify rate increases.As far as fuel adjustment, it has been explained to me that the “Electric” portion of your utility bill is the cost of delivering electricity to your house (i.e. poles, lines, transformers, linemen, etc).  The fuel adjustment is the actual cost of the electricity used.  Many think of the fuel adjustment as an “added” cost to their electric bill, but it has not been explained that way to me.  The City should constantly strive to educate the citizens on its operations…not just on utilities, but in all aspects of City business.10. What would you say is Wellington’s biggest concern over the next four years?Tracy: Business retention and recruitment.  Everything evolves around jobs.  When jobs are available, people move here to work, pay taxes and hopefully spend their money here.The more tax revenue we have, the better we can maintain our infrastructure and offer more amenities to our citizens.  When business close, the population declines, revenues decline, and services have to decline. 2. What is the main reason why you are running for Wellington City Council?Tracy: I thoroughly enjoyed serving previously with the City Council and I love my hometown of Wellington and want to see it do well.  I don’t believe that Council Members are elected to make decisions for the people, but rather to “represent” them and serve as their voice.I would like to continue promoting that philosophy.  After a brief vacation, I’m ready to go back to work.3. Losing businesses is an ongoing concern to the community of Wellington. What do you as a city council member believe you can do to stop the exodus and enhance business growth?Tracy: The focus has always been on how to recruit new business and industry to promote the growth of Wellington, and we overlook focusing on how to help existing businesses.  Most communities, not just Wellington, try to develop new and creative incentives to recruit business and industry to come to town; free land to develop on, tax abatements, and in some cases, cash payoffs.  The problem is that other communities copy this, and very quickly we all end up on the same playing field again.And while we offer great incentives to new business and industry, we are ignoring our existing businesses who have been loyal to the community, have stayed with us through thick and thin, and who are probably struggling in these economic times to keep their doors open.  No incentives are offered to them to help them sustain themselves.  Only if they choose to expand are they given any consideration.  We need to begin a dialog with them to find out what their needs are and how we can help them.  Obviously, reducing taxes in general and imposing fewer restrictions on them can help, just to name a couple of starting places.4. The current Wellington City Council is studying ways to supply water to oil companies. What is your position on the matter?Tracy: If we have the water to sell, I’m not opposed to selling it.  The question is…do we have the water to sell?  Because of the drought, I believe our water resources are in jeopardy.  We have the ability to pump water from the Chikaskia River, but because that water is used by other communities, there is a cap on how much we can pump.The City has planned for more water well exploration, and if it is not in the works, it should be moved to the front burner.  The best solution is for the oil companies to use “grey” water from the sewage treatment plant…sewage water that has been treated and can be put back into the environment, but it has not been disinfected for human consumption yet.  If the Kansas Department of Health and Environment okays the use of grey water, there should be sufficient water for oil company use that will not affect our treated water supply.5. Staying with water, because of the current drought, the water level is low at the Wellington City Lake. Do you favor other alternative water sourcing, or do you believe we should remain status quo on our water resources? Also, will you ever be in favor of water rationing?Tracy: As stated, the City should continue with its plans to explore more water wells to supplement our water supply.  While water rationing is not a pleasant experience, if it has to be done, it has to be done.  I experienced water rationing in the early 1980’s when we suffered a similar drought.  The restrictions did not apply to businesses that use water (such as carwashes) because the City did not want to cripple anyone’s business, but strict restrictions were placed on everyone else.We were not allowed to wash the fire apparatus, and the only time we could use water from a hydrant was in the event of a structure fire.  An old City well at 4th and Vandenburg was reopened where we would go to fill up the fire apparatus tanks after a fire.  That is when there was a boom in private water wells…citizens drilled for water on their own land so they had water for their lawns and gardens.  If it has to be done, it has to be done.  However, if we are concerned that we might have to ration water, we shouldn’t be selling it to oil companies.6. The total assessed valuation in Wellington went down in 2012, but may remain constant or improve with the inclusion of Wal-Mart on the tax roll in 2013. However, this may not be the case in the next four years. If Wellington has a lower assessed value as the previous year, how would you as a council member respond to the lack of tax revenue for the municipality?Tracy: It will be difficult to keep this answer brief.  The City, or any other taxing entity, has no control over the mill levy.  The mill levy is simply a method for the County Clerk to calculate the tax rate needed to bring in the money necessary to meet the budgets set by each taxing entity.  Therefore, your taxes relate directly to the budget that is adopted…and not by assessed valuations.If valuations drop, the mill levy increases, and taxes are roughly the same.  If valuations rise, the mill levy will drop (providing there is no increase in the adopted budgets), and taxes are roughly the same.  The key is with the budgets adopted…if budgets drop, your taxes drop.  If budgets increase, your taxes increase.  If budgets remain the same, your taxes should remain the same.  All is regardless of the assessed valuation.7. Many believe Wellington has trouble promoting itself to outsiders. Do you believe as a tax entity, the city should initiate various promotional programs and if so what would you think they should be?Tracy: This question is tough because you would have to find a way to develop an objective cost-benefit analysis.  I remember television commercials geared to recruiting people to move to Newton, but I no longer see those commercials.  Did the promotion work and Newton’s population increased and met their goal?  Or did the commercials fail and Newton stopped them because the money was not well spent.  I believe the City should take every opportunity it can to promote itself, providing the price is right and the benefit is tangible.last_img read more

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