PREMIERE: Watch Con Brio & The London Souls Tear Up This Sam Cooke Cover Live

first_imgOut of New York, The London Souls are a blues-rock duo composed of guitarist Tash Neal and drummer Chris St. Hilaire, and the two have been enchanting audiences with their explosive live performances for nearly a decade. It seems as though Con Brio functions as an almost perfect inverse of The London Souls. Where the London Souls are reminiscent of the raw musical stylings of the Black Keys, Con Brio, and particularly the group’s charismatic singer and frontman Ziek McCarter, evokes psychedelia-drenched James Brown and Otis Redding. And while The London Souls have a decade of performance under their belt, Con Brio is a relatively new project out of San Francisco, with the band dropping their debut LP Paradise last summer.Con Brio Covers Stevie Wonder While Cruising Over The Golden Gate Bridge [Watch]Despite these surface-level differences, both Con Brio and The London Souls have taken the music world by storm as of late. Both acts offer up music that taps straight into the heart, and both have similarly been wowing crowds across the country with their uplifting and fiery performances. At the tail end of the summer, Con Brio and The London Souls teamed up for a joint six-date tour across the East Coast in promotion of a collaborative 7-inch vinyl featuring tracks “All Over Me” and “Certain Appeal”.This joint project is somewhat of a long time coming considering The London Souls’ drummer St. Hilaire and Con Brio bassist Jonathan Kirchner have been friends since childhood. As told by Kirchner, “Chris and Tash and I go back to high school days in New York. They were always the baddest musicians I knew, so to get to play shows together all these years later—and of course to have them sit in and rip it on a couple songs—was a total dream come true.”Watch The London Souls Obliterate Their Late Night Jazz Fest Set [Video]Today, Live For Live Music is proud to premiere a live pro-shot video of the two band’s collaborative tour—a joint rendition of Sam Cooke’s “Bring It On Home To Me” for a performance at Boston’s Brighton Music Hall on August 23rd. Kirchner gave more context to the performance, “[Con Brio saxophonist Marcus Stephens] gets the nod for suggesting the Sam Cooke cover a couple days before this video was shot. We ran it once in soundcheck and then just went for it. They’re such natural musicians it was a breeze to throw together, and you could tell the crowd really responded to the spontaneity of it.”You can watch the video for yourself below to get a taste of what these two powerhouse performers can do when they join forces.You can find out more information about Con Brio on their website and about The London Souls on their website.Upcoming Con Brio Tour Dates12/27/2017   Harlows – Sacramento12/28/2017   Moe’s – Santa Cruz12/29/2017   Hopmonk – Sebastopol12/30/2017   Swedish American – San Francisco12/31/2017   Swedish American – San Francisco1/13/2018   Crystal Bay Casino – Crystal Bay, NN1/17-1/22/2018   Jam CruiseUpcoming The London Souls Tour Dates3/7/2018 – The Music of Led Zeppelin – Carnegie Hall – NYC[Photo: Cortney Armitage]last_img read more

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Wellington City Council forum: John Tracy

first_imgby Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — John Tracy is a Wellington City Council challenger (and a former council member) running for one of six “at large” positions on the newly restructured board.Registered voters within the Wellington city limits can vote in this race which will have 15 candidates on the ballot. The top three vote-getters will receive four-year terms. The second three will receive two-year terms.Voters can vote for up to six candidates. They can vote for one candidate, two candidates, three, four, five or six – but nothing more.The city/school election will be held on Tuesday, April 2. Polls open at 7 a.m. and close at 7 p.m. at the Raymond Frye Complex. People can also advance vote at the Sumner County Clerk’s office.The following is a list of questions submitted to Tracy.1. Tell us about yourself.Tracy: Aside from jobs I’ve had in high school and pre-high school, I started on the Wellington Fire/EMS Department just three months after graduating from high school.  I served the City from 1977 to 1995 where I rose to the rank of Asst. Fire Chief.  Since 1995, I’ve been employed with Sumner County and serve as the Asst. 911 Director.While on the City, I received numerous awards and commendations including the A.B. Preston Distinguished Service Award, the Employee Teamwork Award, and was nominated for the Customer Service Award.  While a firefighter, I held a part-time job with the Wellington Parks Department for two or three years.  I also served four terms on the Wellington City Council from 2004 to 2012.  My entire adult life has been in public service. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments 8. Do you believe in tax incentives to lure in private business? If so or not, please explain.Tracy: If we are meeting the needs of existing businesses and helping them sustain, then I have no problem in providing tax incentives to lure in private business.  But to expend resources to lure in one business, while another business goes under, does not gain any ground.  Also regarding development, recruit businesses to fill in the voids in Wellington.Every time we extend infrastructure (water, sewer, roads, and electric) to find a new place for a new business, we add water lines, sewer lines, roads, and electric lines that will need to be maintained.  We are having a difficult time maintaining what we have now…should we add to it? 9. The Wellington utility rates continue to be a concern to many citizens, especially the fuel adjustment rates. Do you believe they are reasonable and in line with other communities? Should the city make a change in the way it handles utilities? Tracy: There are communities with higher utility rates and there are communities with lower utility rates.  I do not believe we can focus on only one thing.  For example, a community with higher utility rates may have lower taxes, and a community with lower utility rates may have higher taxes.  You really have to look at the total cost of living and the quality of life in order to compare apples to apples.The Utility Fund is comprised of both electric and water sales.  If the Utility Fund is prospering because of water sales, I cannot justify raising electric rates simply because the electric side in making a minimal profit, and vice versa.  If the entire Utility Fund is struggling, then I can justify rate increases.As far as fuel adjustment, it has been explained to me that the “Electric” portion of your utility bill is the cost of delivering electricity to your house (i.e. poles, lines, transformers, linemen, etc).  The fuel adjustment is the actual cost of the electricity used.  Many think of the fuel adjustment as an “added” cost to their electric bill, but it has not been explained that way to me.  The City should constantly strive to educate the citizens on its operations…not just on utilities, but in all aspects of City business.10. What would you say is Wellington’s biggest concern over the next four years?Tracy: Business retention and recruitment.  Everything evolves around jobs.  When jobs are available, people move here to work, pay taxes and hopefully spend their money here.The more tax revenue we have, the better we can maintain our infrastructure and offer more amenities to our citizens.  When business close, the population declines, revenues decline, and services have to decline. 2. What is the main reason why you are running for Wellington City Council?Tracy: I thoroughly enjoyed serving previously with the City Council and I love my hometown of Wellington and want to see it do well.  I don’t believe that Council Members are elected to make decisions for the people, but rather to “represent” them and serve as their voice.I would like to continue promoting that philosophy.  After a brief vacation, I’m ready to go back to work.3. Losing businesses is an ongoing concern to the community of Wellington. What do you as a city council member believe you can do to stop the exodus and enhance business growth?Tracy: The focus has always been on how to recruit new business and industry to promote the growth of Wellington, and we overlook focusing on how to help existing businesses.  Most communities, not just Wellington, try to develop new and creative incentives to recruit business and industry to come to town; free land to develop on, tax abatements, and in some cases, cash payoffs.  The problem is that other communities copy this, and very quickly we all end up on the same playing field again.And while we offer great incentives to new business and industry, we are ignoring our existing businesses who have been loyal to the community, have stayed with us through thick and thin, and who are probably struggling in these economic times to keep their doors open.  No incentives are offered to them to help them sustain themselves.  Only if they choose to expand are they given any consideration.  We need to begin a dialog with them to find out what their needs are and how we can help them.  Obviously, reducing taxes in general and imposing fewer restrictions on them can help, just to name a couple of starting places.4. The current Wellington City Council is studying ways to supply water to oil companies. What is your position on the matter?Tracy: If we have the water to sell, I’m not opposed to selling it.  The question is…do we have the water to sell?  Because of the drought, I believe our water resources are in jeopardy.  We have the ability to pump water from the Chikaskia River, but because that water is used by other communities, there is a cap on how much we can pump.The City has planned for more water well exploration, and if it is not in the works, it should be moved to the front burner.  The best solution is for the oil companies to use “grey” water from the sewage treatment plant…sewage water that has been treated and can be put back into the environment, but it has not been disinfected for human consumption yet.  If the Kansas Department of Health and Environment okays the use of grey water, there should be sufficient water for oil company use that will not affect our treated water supply.5. Staying with water, because of the current drought, the water level is low at the Wellington City Lake. Do you favor other alternative water sourcing, or do you believe we should remain status quo on our water resources? Also, will you ever be in favor of water rationing?Tracy: As stated, the City should continue with its plans to explore more water wells to supplement our water supply.  While water rationing is not a pleasant experience, if it has to be done, it has to be done.  I experienced water rationing in the early 1980’s when we suffered a similar drought.  The restrictions did not apply to businesses that use water (such as carwashes) because the City did not want to cripple anyone’s business, but strict restrictions were placed on everyone else.We were not allowed to wash the fire apparatus, and the only time we could use water from a hydrant was in the event of a structure fire.  An old City well at 4th and Vandenburg was reopened where we would go to fill up the fire apparatus tanks after a fire.  That is when there was a boom in private water wells…citizens drilled for water on their own land so they had water for their lawns and gardens.  If it has to be done, it has to be done.  However, if we are concerned that we might have to ration water, we shouldn’t be selling it to oil companies.6. The total assessed valuation in Wellington went down in 2012, but may remain constant or improve with the inclusion of Wal-Mart on the tax roll in 2013. However, this may not be the case in the next four years. If Wellington has a lower assessed value as the previous year, how would you as a council member respond to the lack of tax revenue for the municipality?Tracy: It will be difficult to keep this answer brief.  The City, or any other taxing entity, has no control over the mill levy.  The mill levy is simply a method for the County Clerk to calculate the tax rate needed to bring in the money necessary to meet the budgets set by each taxing entity.  Therefore, your taxes relate directly to the budget that is adopted…and not by assessed valuations.If valuations drop, the mill levy increases, and taxes are roughly the same.  If valuations rise, the mill levy will drop (providing there is no increase in the adopted budgets), and taxes are roughly the same.  The key is with the budgets adopted…if budgets drop, your taxes drop.  If budgets increase, your taxes increase.  If budgets remain the same, your taxes should remain the same.  All is regardless of the assessed valuation.7. Many believe Wellington has trouble promoting itself to outsiders. Do you believe as a tax entity, the city should initiate various promotional programs and if so what would you think they should be?Tracy: This question is tough because you would have to find a way to develop an objective cost-benefit analysis.  I remember television commercials geared to recruiting people to move to Newton, but I no longer see those commercials.  Did the promotion work and Newton’s population increased and met their goal?  Or did the commercials fail and Newton stopped them because the money was not well spent.  I believe the City should take every opportunity it can to promote itself, providing the price is right and the benefit is tangible.last_img read more

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More than a protest camp Unistoten camp residents on life on the

first_imgHOUSTON, B.C. — Staring into a fire outside a sweat lodge at the Unist’ot’en camp, Johnny Morris passes a ball of snow between his hands until it melts.The 31-year-old Wet’suwet’en man said he’s almost three months sober for the first time in years and he attributes it to his time spent on the land focusing on daily activities like trapping and ceremonial sweats.The camp is known as the place where protesters blocked a natural gas company from accessing a nearby work site, but the healing centre is what’s significant to Morris and some others.“Coming back to the roots of our ancestors, having access to the land, I’m able to trap, to go hunting, to harvest what’s out on the land, reconnect with my culture,” Morris said. “It truly is a medicine for my spirit, for my soul.”Weeks earlier, emotions at the camp were at a fever pitch as residents and supporters prepared for what they believed would be a police raid on the camp. Many flocked to the area after RCMP enforced a court injunction, dismantling a blockade and arresting 14 people at a site down a gravel road from the camp.The conflict surrounds Coastal GasLink’s plans to build a pipeline from northeastern British Columbia to LNG Canada’s export terminal in Kitimat on the coast. While the company said it has agreements with all 20 elected First Nations councils along the pipeline’s path, including some Wet’suwet’en bands, the nation’s five hereditary clan chiefs say it’s illegitimate without their consent too.The clan chiefs ultimately reached an agreement with RCMP allowing pipeline workers down a road that cuts through the camp, aligning with the interim injunction granted by the B.C. Supreme Court.The truce has failed to calm concerns at the camp. Members have complained the company began construction work without an archeological assessment and bulldozed through their traplines.“Them coming into the territory, it’s making a big impact. I’m doing my best to better myself, and to see them coming in, bullying their way in, it triggers me,” Morris said.The B.C. Oil and Gas Commission and the Environmental Assessment Office are investigating the complaints, while Coastal GasLink said its actions have been lawful.Several images repeat in Morris’s head from his life before arriving at the camp: The arrest of his father for a crime he says he didn’t commit. Waking up in a trauma room to deafening silence with his mother and aunt on either side after nine viles of Narcan reversed his fentanyl overdose. Walking without shoes down a road in the dead of winter after a night of drinking.Morris arrived at the camp with his wife, Jessica Wilson-Morris, after she had her own wake up call in a hospital bed. The doctor told her he’d never had to tell a 25-year-old that she would die if she didn’t stop drinking.Wilson-Morris said she and Morris have supported one another through trauma after trauma, including the deaths of their fathers and her five-week-old niece. When she told him she was getting sober, he said he would too.  “He’s the glue that keeps my broken pieces together,” she said.Wilson-Morris said she’s tried rehab before but it never stuck.“I went to a treatment centre and they wouldn’t even listen to me,” she said.The Unist’ot’en camp is different, she said. She’s begun sharing her story with residents and supporters, many of whom didn’t realize she was there for recovery.“They listen here,” she said. “And we’re isolated in a good way here, we’re not half an hour away from the liquor store.”Freda Huson, who is named in the court injunction, said she moved onto the land at the camp 10 years ago after the Supreme Court of Canada’s Delgamuukw ruling in 1997 recognizing the existence of Aboriginal title.The case was fought by the Wet’suwet’en and Gitxsan First Nations and paved the way for later rulings.“My dad told me that the only way to truly protect our land was to occupy it, so that’s what I did,” Huson said.Today, the largest building at the Unist’ot’en camp is the three-storey healing centre topped with solar panels. It has sleeping quarters, plumbing, a dining hall downstairs and a room upstairs for storage alongside foosball and pool tables.Further down the path there’s a cabin and across the road is a bunkhouse with a mural of past Unist’ot’en leaders painted on its side. Three dogs roam the grounds and one roles over regularly for belly rubs.Members of the camp conduct “protocol” at the entrance of the bridge into camp and towards Coastal GasLink’s planned work site. Visitors and workers are asked questions like who they are, how long they plan to stay and whether they’re doing work for government or industry that will destroy the land.“We’ve let (logging company) Canfor in, we’ve let tree planters in, we didn’t block all industry,” Huson said.The camp began as tents, but has grown with help from supporters who raised money and volunteered their time in construction.Huson’s sister Brenda Michell said the Wet’suwet’en used the lands southwest of Houston long before the Unist’ot’en camp was established.“My uncle used to come here as a boy, trapping before the bridge came in,” she said, looking across the Morice River, which is home to steelhead trout and five salmon species, and is so clean that residents drink straight from the waterway.Members of the First Nation like her grandmother set up seasonal camps on the land while the men went trapping, with the idea that they would move regularly so as not to deplete moose populations or other resources, she said.Lht’at’en said her grandmother, who was born in 1867, warned her descendants never to sell the land, which they refer to as the yintah.“She always told us, ‘Don’t sell our yintah. Your ancestors, your great uncles, they lived off the land and made it very clear for us to continue using the land,’ ” said Lht’at’en, who is Huson and Michell’s aunt.Despite the role of the camp in resisting the pipeline, she said it’s been misrepresented.“They call our camp a protest camp, it is how people look at us. But the reason why the barriers were up is (because) we’ve been victims,” she said.About three years ago, she said shots were fired from across the bridge and racists slurs were shouted, but no one was every charged.It was Michell’s daughter, Karla Tait, who had the idea for a healing centre at the camp.Tait, who holds a PhD in clinical psychology, said she was starting to recognize a disconnect in her work life, where non-Indigenous clinicians often had trouble understanding the impact of generational trauma and colonization on their Indigenous clients.The idea was to integrate wellness treatments within the Wet’suwet’en cultural context and territory. Since then, Tait has hosted workshops focused on women or youth that incorporate traditions like berry picking and traditional art practices.Tait said the pipeline conflict has triggered many members of the community.“One of the really difficult things about this particular conflict is that it resurfaces and triggers all of the historical intergenerational trauma our people have experienced since contact in different ways on a daily basis,” Tait said, giving the arrests of Indigenous women and the encroachment on land as examples.Tait has been unable to visit the camp recently, but said she’s been curious to hear of the progress of clients like Morris and Wilson-Morris without a more formal treatment plan. She attributes it to Huson’s compassion, and the value of reconnecting Indigenous people to the land in a way that instills a sense of pride and feeling valued.“Behind (those cultural practices), the healing just occurs naturally and doesn’t require a lot of interference,” she said.Wilson-Morris said she and Morris plan to stay until the snow melts, or for as long as it takes for them to feel strong enough to leave.“It’s really good healing, seeing nature and stuff, listening to the river, the dogs. This place has helped me — it’s a life changer,” Wilson-Morris said.Amy Smart, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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