Roosevelt Shooting Leaves Man Wounded

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A man was shot and wounded in Roosevelt on Friday night, Nassau County police said.Officers responded to a call of shots fired on Westerfield Avenue where they found the victim suffering from a gunshot wound to his arm at 11:19 p.m.., police said.The victim was taken to an area hospital where he was treated for a non life threatening injury.Special Investigations Squad detectives request anyone with information regarding this crime to contact Nassau County Crime Stoppers at 1-800-244-TIPS. All callers will remain anonymous.last_img read more

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Kurtenbach: The Warriors are searching for an identity

first_imgOAKLAND – The Warriors are perhaps the least ambiguous entity in the world of professional sports.When you go to four straight NBA Finals, establishing yourself as the dominant force in a league surging in popularity worldwide, people tend to know who you are and what you’re about.But while the Warriors return their four All-Stars in their quest to be the second team in NBA history and the first in 50 years to make the Finals five straight years, you didn’t need to watch their season debut …last_img read more

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Ringside Seats on an Urban Planning Rivalry

first_imgIn one corner we have New Urbanism, an approach to urban planning that favors residential density and mixed use over suburban sprawl and dependence on the automobile. In the other corner is Landscape Urbanism, which sees suburban development not only as market-proven and integral to our way of life, but also as an opportunity to ecologically harmonize each community with its environment — in spite of suburbia’s reliance on the automobile.The New Urbanism has been around for about 30 years, and its theory has been applied to hundreds of projects, perhaps most famously to Seaside, a community on the Florida panhandle that began development in the early 1980s and now serves a substantial number of vacationers in addition to year-round residents. Landscape Urbanism has been gaining currency in many academic settings over the past decade, most notably at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design, although, as a recent Boston Globe article on the two strategies points out, the theory has yet to be applied widely.Trading jabsThe relationship between New Urbanism and Landscape Urbanism factions is, apparently, robustly adversarial. The latter’s most prominent proponent, architect Charles Waldheim, who is chair of Harvard’s Graduate School of Design, presents Landscape Urbanism as a vastly preferable – and decidedly more realistic – alternative to New Urbanism.“The overwhelming majority of discourse in urban planning and design has been biased, has been kind of prejudiced to the idea that Manhattan-ism is the most sustainable urban future,” Waldheim said recently. “On the one hand, we know that density addresses a number of issues, but on the other hand, as soon as you say, ‘Where does your milk come from?’ we have a whole different set of questions about sustainability.”Flag-bearers for New Urbanism, whose leaders include Andres Duany, an architect of the Seaside development, portray Landscape Urbanists as “lawn apologists,” a group of theorists who tout the virtues of automobile-based communities while sweetening their rhetoric with environmental catchphrases. (For another perspective on recent comments by Andres Duany, see “New Urbanist Andres Duany Lashes Out at LEED.”)Room for both approaches?A few readers responding to the Globe story write off the conflict as little more than an academic food fight. The reality is, though, that New Urbanism has been repeatedly put into practice and Landscape Urbanism likely will find its way into more than one community master plan – and both approaches will attract customers. Another, increasingly pressing reality is that if they expect their theories to prove and/or remain viable, both factions will have to focus more and more on better management of natural resources.Even Waldheim is acutely aware, for example, that reliance on the automobile – that lynchpin of suburbia that Landscape Urbanists refer to as automobility – is vulnerable to the onset of peak oil, after which the rate of oil extraction will soon begin an inexorable decline.“I think for many urban designers and planners, and many advocates of denser, more traditional urban form, there’s been a correlation that seems (to be) post-peak-oil is post-automobility,” Waldheim, in an interview conducted in 2008, said, adding that he and some of his colleagues expect that a set of carbon-neutral “bridging technologies” (presumably including electric cars) will keep automobility in the picture.And the green homebuilder’s role in all this? If these rivals practice what they preach, those who build energy efficient homes should find work in both types of development.last_img read more

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Sorry, Larry, But Oracle’s Cloud BS Is Wearing Thin

first_imgRuthless competitiveness is what Oracle Chief Executive Larry Ellison uses to win in business. So no one should be surprised that how he defines the cloud depends on what’s needed at the time. Inevitably, this sometimes shows the emperor has no clothes, or at least is down to his Armani skivvies.While something in Oracle’s massive portfolio may fit the industry definition of a cloud service, it is not the company’s new integrated hardware and software bundle that’s meant to provide the infrastructure for private clouds, according to David Linthicum, chief technology officer and co-founder of cloud consultancy Blue Mountain Labs. What Oracle is really selling, or in this case renting, is preconfigured application servers for the data center.“Now we know how Oracle is addressing this shift in the market: by renting its stuff and calling it a cloud,” Linthicum says.Oracle’s Cloud StrategyOracle’s cloud strategy has been challenged before. Charles Babcock, who has covered the cloud for years for IT trade magazine InformationWeek, named Oracle the number one “cloud washer” of 2011. That term refers to companies whose cloud products are mostly old technology with the word cloud added to the name.At the time, Babcock took aim at the Oracle Exalogic Elastic Cloud, “a name that contains so many contradictions of the definition of cloud computing that it threatens to render the term meaningless.”“It’s an old-fashioned appliance that’s been renamed ‘a cloud in a box,’” he wrote.Oracle Can’t Move Fast EnoughMulti-billion-dollar companies like Oracle can’t simply turn a switch and re-architect their technology to meet customer demand for something so dramatically different as cloud computing. This is why Ellison refused to acknowledge the cloud even existed until Oracle OpenWorld in September 2010. With startups eating away at his software business, Ellison needed to do something fast. Confusing customers with verbiage was the quickest way to buy time.Fast-forward two years to this year’s Oracle’s OpenWord conference in San Francisco, and cloud became Ellison’s favorite word to essentially describe renting Oracle data center technology, and letting the company handle the maintenance. Instead of real cloud computing, Ellison introduced what was mostly a new way of buying last-generation technology.What’s In StoreThis year should get really interesting. Oracle is expected to start feeling even more pressure from true public cloud providers, such as Amazon Web Services, Google, Microsoft and Rackspace, as well as private cloud providers like Eucalyptus. If history is an indicator, then Ellison is likely to release the attack dogs in his marketing department to try to discredit rivals and confuse customers, while the company plays catch up.For example, Oracle responded last year to tough competition from IBM in the hardware business by releasing ads with unsubstantiated claims that Oracle servers were much better. Three times the National Advertising Division of the Better Business Bureau pressured Oracle into removing the ads that appeared as full-page spreads in The Wall Street Journal and other publications.The last ad, pulled in November, claimed Oracle’s Exadata server would run five times faster than IBM’s Power Server “or you win $10,000,000.” The NAD found that the ad did not provide “any speed performance tests, examples of comparative system speed superiority or any other data to substantiate the message.”Ellison is sure to use this kind of bare-knuckles competitiveness in battling cloud rivals. It’s in his DNA. Let’s not forget that in January, Oracle Team USA, the America’s Cup champion team owned by Ellison, was fined more than $15,000 for spying on the Italian team.So cloud watchers should sit back and get comfortable. Ellison is likely to provide quite a show and a lot more smoke and mirrors.Photo by ShutterStock. 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now antone gonsalves IT + Project Management: A Love Affair Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo…center_img Tags:#cloud#Oracle Related Posts Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of…last_img read more

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The Passion Revolution in Learning – and What It Means for You

first_imgAuthor: Jim LangcusterThis article was originally published Wednesday November 13, 2013 on the Military Families Learning Network blog.This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. Hi, AleX:Pardon this deep immersion in storytelling, but no three accounts better illustrate the kind of world in which we are now living — not to mention, navigating, as 21stcentury professionals.We’ve already introduced you to Frank Kovac. He is the determined individual whose father instilled him with a deep, abiding love of the stars.  From an early age, Kovac dreamed of becoming an astronomer and planetarium operator.  Unfortunately, taxing college math courses stymied that dream.Note that I used stymied instead of prevented, because Kovac never let the lack of a conventional educational credential stand in his way of his goal.  You recall the rest of the story: Supporting himself as a paper mill worker in rural Wisconsin, Kovac used his free time to access books and online sources about astronomy as well as the design and construction of planetariums.In time, he built his own hand-operated planetarium, which he touts as the largest one of its kind in the world.  For all intents and purposes, Kovac is a planetarium director in the fullest sense of the word.  His small facility has even become a local Wisconsin tourist attraction from which visitors not only leave impressed with Kovac’s immense knowledge of the stars but also imbued with a measure of his infectious passion.Passion: Kovac’s life speaks volumes about what a powerfully emotive force it an be in shaping lives.  Educators are taking note of this essential truth, too.  Some, including Dr. Sugatra Mitra, to whom you have also been introduced, are calling for the end of the industrial age educational model, partly for the reason that it does such a lousy job instilling passion.As Mitra has learned, passion is the key to learning — actually, it always has been, only now, the power of digital media is underscoring that essential truth.  As you recall, Mitra got his own taste of this after installing a computer in a wall in an impoverished Indian village near the corporate headquarters of a software company where he worked as a chief scientist.Sugatra Mitra, world-renowed proponent of emergent learningWhat he discovered based on experimentation with similar wall computers within the next few years challenges conventional education but also threatens to drive a stake into its heart.The children quickly learned how to use the embedded computer.   This prompted more experimentation on Mitra’s part.  A few years later, he uploaded information about molecular biology onto a computer in a southern Indian village.  After informing a group of 10- to 14- year-olds they would find something interesting on this computer, he turned and walked away, not returning until a couple of months later.During that time, the children not only learned how to work the computer but also were able to answer one in four questions on the computer about molecular biology.Within few more weeks, the children, inspired by the encouragement of a friendly local, got every question right.Through all this experimentation, Mitra has gained a heightened appreciation not only for emergent learning but also for the values that underscore it: innovation, creativity, independent thinking and, yes, passion.These insights have led to something equally significant: a global dialogue about the learning as an emergent process.Quoted recently in an online version of Wired, Mitra observed that “If you put a computer in front of children and remove all other adult restrictions, they will self-organize around it like bees around a flower.”To put it another way, “if you’re not the one controlling your learning, you’re not learning as well,” Mitra contends.Word of these insights is spreading to a growing number of educators around the world, many of whom struggle to reach students in the most disadvantaged of circumstances.An article published Oct. 15 in the online edition of Wired highlights the efforts of Mexican teacher Sergio Juarez Correa.  Juarez Correa has desperately searched for ways  to reach his students at the Jose Urbina Primary School, an impoverished school located near a dump in a sun-drenched northern Mexico border town little more than a stone’s throw from American schools where tablets, Ipads another other online learning tools are almost taken wantonly for granted.Until he discovered Mitra’s emergent learning practices, Juarez Correa employed the same hidebound teaching methods as virtually every other Mexican teacher — lectures, memorization and lots of busy work — ones that had secured the same frustrating results year after year: low test scores.Juarez Correa determined to put Mitra’s insights into practical use in his classroom by allowing his students, in Mitra’s words, to “wonder aimlessly around ideas.” The change that took hold of Juarez Correa’s class not only astonished him but also his principal upon discovering how this new teaching method produced a dramatic turnaround in test scores.Previous test scores revealed that 45 percent of the class had essentially failed the math section of the test, while 31 percent failed Spanish.  The latest results revealed that a mere 7 percent failed math and 3.5 percent failed Spanish.  Equally significant, sixty-three percent of the class garnered excellent scores while none had in the previous test.These new insights are not only receiving a receptive ear in materially disadvantaged countries such as Mexico.  For example, the Wired article reports that in the 1990s Finland, in addition to reducing its math curriculum from 25 pages to four and the school day by an hour, also began focusing on independence and active learning.  By 2003, Finnish students had ascended from lower ranks of international performance to first place among developed nations.Americans classrooms, despite being equipped to the teeth with all manner of laptops, tablets and iPads, should draw a lesson from this dramatic change of thinking.As the Wired article reports, currently almost a third of U.S. high school graduates are not academically prepared for the first year of college courses.  Equally disturbing, the United States now holds a dismal ranking of 49th among 148 developed and developing nations in the quality of math and science instruction.Equally significant, the article also reports that the top three demanded skills in the 21st century will be teamwork, problem-solving, and interpersonal skills. We need schools that are developing these skills.AleX, we have stressed to you before how you and millions of other professionals were trained to think about and deliver information in linear terms — through programs such as lectures, seminars, and workshops, with your students serving more or less as passive recipients of this instruction.The ways you serve you clients have been defined by those methods for the bulk of your career.All of this is changing — quickly and inexorably, Alex.  The ways people connect to knowledge — education almost seems too constricted a term to describe what is taking place — has become more open and democratized than ever before.And, frankly, we should all revel in and celebrate that fact. This is part of the “Hi, AleX” series — advice to AleX NetLit about enhancing her levels of network literacy through day-to-day personal and professional social networking. AleX Netlit is a fictional persona created by Network Literacy Community of Practice to serve as a guide to Military Families Service professionals, Cooperative Extension educators and others seeking to learn more about using online networks in their work.More about Alex NetLitlast_img read more

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Lyceum stays unbeaten, cruises to 10th straight win

first_imgBrace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC LATEST STORIES San Beda, Lyceum early favorites ahead of NCAA Season 93 PLAY LIST 02:12San Beda, Lyceum early favorites ahead of NCAA Season 9300:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Lyceum lost hold of its 17-point lead, 71-54 in the third quarter as Laurenz Victoria and Leo Gabo willed Mapua to get to as close as six late in the game.Robinson said that it’s something his team needs to work on as the Pirates gear up for tougher foes ahead.“That’s the challenge for us. If we want to stay on top, there’s a lot of responsibilities that come with it. We’re the barometer. Hopefully, this will be a wake up call for us that any team can beat us if we let our guards down,” he said.Gabo paced Mapua (1-9) with 21 points and five assists, while Christian Buñag had 18 markers and 14 rebounds in the loss.The Scores:ADVERTISEMENT For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses Read Next CJ Perez paced the Pirates with 22 points and nine rebounds, while Jaycee Marcelino got 19 markers, six boards, and two dimes.MJ Ayaay and Ralph Tansingco both chimed in 10 points apiece in Lyceum’s 10th straight win.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutCoach Topex Robinson, though, was dissatisfied with how his side reacted to the Cardinals’ challenge, as the cellar dwellers gave the Pirates everything they could handle.“I guess we didn’t play our usual game. We didn’t honor the game and it almost backfired on us. Credit to coach Atoy (Co) for preparing his team well for us,” the youthful mentor said. View comments UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension Africa champion Cameroon misses out on World Cupcenter_img Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Lyceum didn’t look like it missed a beat as it sustained its hot streak to the second round of the NCAA Season 93 men’s basketball tournament with a 96-90 victory over Mapua Tuesday at Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ LYCEUM 96 – Perez 22, Jc. Marcelino 19, Ayaay 10, Tansingco 10, Caduyac 8, Pretta 8, Jv. Marcelino 6, Liwag 5, Nzeusseu 5, Marata 3, Baltazar 0, Cinco 0, Ibañez 0, Santos 0.MAPUA 90 – Gabo 21, Buñag 18, Victoria 16, Aguirre 11, Nieles 9, Orquina 7, Pelayo 6, Raflores 2.Quarters: 20-21, 48-43, 73-58, 96-90. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Gameslast_img read more

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10 months agoNewcastle owner Ashley confident sale date can be met

first_imgNewcastle owner Ashley confident sale date can be metby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveNewcastle United owner Mike Ashley is growing confident of completing the club’s sale before the New Year.The Daily Star says the legal team at law firm Walker Morris, who are working on the sale with Peter Kenyon, have been told that all Christmas leave has been cancelled.It suggests that both parties have thrashed out a deal in principle and are now working on the finer details in readiness for a takeover within the next few weeks.Ashley has publicly stated he wants to sever his links with the club he’s owned for the past 11 years.And the buyers too are keen to get their feet under the table as soon as possible.That is music to the ears of Newcastle boss Rafael Benitez, who knows his January spending plans could depend on the sale of the club. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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