Mysterious Political Radiohead Street Art Is Appearing For The 20th Anniversary Of ‘OK Computer’

first_imgIn major cities across the world like London, New York, Amsterdam, and more, mysterious Radiohead-themed street art has been popping up. The words these anonymous posters contain are reminiscent of the lyrics of “Fitter Happier” off of OK Computer, with political messages such as “More Public Fear/More Private Security” and “Less Political Participation/Worse Politicians/More Fear.” These speculations that the street art is related to OK Computer are strengthened by the dates at the bottom of each piece, which note 1997 and 2017, alluding to OK Computer’s 20th anniversary coming up on May 21st.Additionally, Stanley Donwood, the artist and writer behind Radiohead’s album and poster artwork since 1994, recently posted an work on Instagram post featuring the Radiohead logo front and center along with the caption “soon to be real,” only heightening speculations that the Radiohead camp is behind the street art ahead of the seminal album’s 20th anniversary. Pitchfork notes that it has reached out to Radiohead about these mysterious pop-up works.Take a listen to “Fitter Happier,” then take a look at Donwood’s post and images of the street art to decide for yourself what’s the meaning behind the works.[Photo credit: Dan Jordan] [H/T Pitchfork] Just saw this on the way to the studio now hype levels spiralling out of control #okcomputer pic.twitter.com/8dTWKru01y— martin (@doksan) April 26, 2017last_img read more

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The director and the whistle-blower

first_imgEven when he’s the subject matter, Oliver Stone directs. Meeting with reporters in the guest speaker’s “green room” before his appearance Monday night at the Harvard Kennedy School, the filmmaker at first asked that the temperature in the room be lowered. He next instructed photographers how he wished to be photographed. (“Why do you take the side so much?” he quipped.)Soon after, in front of a packed audience of more than 700 undergraduate and graduate students, Stone yelled out for someone to raise the volume when a clip was played of his new movie, “Snowden,” about National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden. The stage lights, the Oscar-winning director also complained, were way too bright. “I feel like I’m under interrogation here,” he joked.In a way, since taking on the controversial Snowden as a film project, he has been.In seemingly every interview he grants, Stone is asked what it was like to meet Snowden, a fugitive living secretly in Moscow who is wanted by the U.S. Justice Department on charges that he violated the Espionage Act and damaged his country’s security.The other question Stone is pressed to answer: Is his movie a true depiction of Snowden’s case, or merely his personal view of a man who is portrayed largely as a hero for releasing top-secret files in 2013 that showed, among other shocking revelations, that the government gathers the phone calls and emails of hundreds of millions of people.Stone, who turns 70 this week, is of course well-accustomed to being a lightning rod for debate. He has made a career out of taking on the toughest of subject matter, from the Vietnam War to the assassination of President John Kennedy to the travails of President Richard Nixon, generally presenting an anti-establishment view of American history.‘When you take somebody’s life, you are responsible to tell that story, and I think we told it as quickly as we could, as dramatically as we could.’ — Oliver StoneWith “Snowden,” which opens nationally on Friday, with actor Joseph Gordon-Levitt in the leading role, Stone is adamant that he did not set out to prove the 33-year-old whistle-blower’s innocence. He said he had no intention of making a movie about him, in fact, until Snowden’s attorney in Russia reached out to him through channels, eventually inviting him to Moscow to meet clandestinely with Snowden.“I went out of curiosity. Who’s going to say no to a man like that?” Stone told his audience.The man he found, he continued, was intelligent, articulate, and above all a passionate believer in the Constitution, which Snowden believed the government violated. (In 2015, a federal appeals court ruled that the phone surveillance program Snowden brought to light was illegal.)“I was very impressed by him. He’s not a guy to hang out with in a bar. He’s very serious. He lives on his computer,” Stone said. “He’s the opposite of the celebrity type, the attention-seeker.” <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5rC0qpLGciU” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/5rC0qpLGciU/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> Related With such a protagonist, some film critics already have called “Snowden” too methodical, even dull, lacking the flash of Stone’s most engaging films. (Others, meanwhile, love the movie.) Stone said he doesn’t read reviews until a movie’s run is “way over.” But he said it was a huge challenge to portray Snowden’s largely cyber world (the details of which Stone himself found “mindlessly boring,” he said) in a way that would grip audiences.“When you take somebody’s life, you are responsible to tell that story, and I think we told it as quickly as we could, as dramatically as we could,” he told reporters before his talk.Clips of the movie, shown at various times during Stone’s talk, were indeed engaging, and well-received by students who filled the John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum, a theater space at the Kennedy School’s Institute of Politics where Stone said he last spoke in 1992 after the release of his movie “JFK.” Many in the audience flocked afterward to the Harvard Film Archive, which co-sponsored Stone’s talk and featured a special showing of “Snowden” last night. A ‘sitdown’ with Snowden In videoconference, U.S. contractor who leaked surveillance data defends actions Stone’s talk was moderated by Ron Suskind, a Harvard Law School lecturer and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who directs the Law School’s Investigative Journalism Project. Suskind and Stone have known each other for years and had a comfortable rapport, though Suskind challenged Stone at times with tough questions, pushing the director on whether his own liberal biases entered into “Snowden.”To that, Stone replied that he and co-writer Kieran Fitzgerald did as much research as they could, reviewing journalistic accounts and released documents, as well as interviewing Laura Poitras, whose documentary on Snowden, “Citizenfour,” won the 2015 Oscar, and Snowden’s girlfriend, Lindsay Mills, who joined him to live in Moscow and, Stone said, is more important to his tale than anyone realizes.“I made nine visits to Moscow to try to get his side of the story. There’s only so far you can go before you gotta say enough,” Stone said, his hands in the air. “When you strip all the research out, you gotta make a movie that works because people want to see what happens next. I would never consciously distort the truth for that goal. Never. I never felt that I have.”Snowden himself, interviewed recently by The Financial Times of London, said the movie’s story is as “as close to real as you can get in a film.” Stone, who showed reporters the quote on his cellphone, clearly takes heart in that.“I hope there are more whistle-blowers,” he said. “We need them desperately in our society.”last_img read more

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The toll over the Krk bridge is abolished

first_imgHvatske autoceste and Autocesta Rijeka – Zagreb, two state-owned companies that manage 1112 kilometers of motorways, will merge into one company, and a decision on that should be made at a government session this or next week. And with this merger, the toll collection over the Krk bridge, which is currently managed by ARZ, will be abolished, reports Vecernji list. Photo: Krk Tourist Board Marko Boras Mandić from the I want the same rights initiative, also confirms that the toll is abolished, but that an official decision is awaited: “It seems that we have succeeded, but I will believe only when I see that there are no toll booths ”. The Ministry states that the unification of the management of state-owned motorways will, among other things, facilitate the introduction of a new toll collection system.  Following the launch of the “I Want the Same Rights” Initiative to abolish tolls or tolls across the Krk Bridge and various protests, in early February this year, a collection of signatures was launched through a petition in support. In two weeks, 11.559 signatures were collected to abolish the collection, which were submitted to the Ministry of the Sea, Transport and Infrastructure. center_img Until now (and still is), the Krk Bridge has remained the only bridge in Croatia where tolls are collected, although the profit from the collection has already paid off many times the funds invested in its construction and maintenance. Interesting information is that the construction contract and the social agreement should have abolished the toll when the construction costs are repaid. The crossing over the Krk bridge for personal vehicles out of season is 35 kuna, and the summer tariff, as on the entire highway, is 10 percent more expensive. As they point out on the FB page I want the same rights which was the central communication point of the initiative for the abolition of tolls is just waiting for the official decision of the Ministry. “The petition was successful! Thanks to everyone who participated. “last_img read more

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Diamond Offshore scoops new rig deals

first_imgOcean Valor; Photo by: Andy Grzymala ATGphotos.comHouston-based offshore driller Diamond Offshore has won several new contracts for its drilling rigs.In the company’s fleet status announced on Monday, February 12 Diamond Offshore said that the Ocean Guardian semi-submersible drilling rig scored a contract with Chevron in the UK.Namely, the 1985-built rig has been awarded a two-well contract with Chevron, starting in late May and ending late September 2018. The report further states that the start date for the rig’s preceding contract with Decipher, also in the UK, has been changed from mid-February to late-February and the end date from mid-May to late May. The rates for these two contracts have not been disclosed.The 2008-built Ocean Monarch semi-submersible rig has won a well-based contract with Cooper and Exxon in Australia from mid-March to mid-September 2018 while the 2009-built Ocean Valor got a two-year extension.Ocean Valor has been working for Petrobras since its delivery and it was supposed to work for the Brazilian oil giant until October 2018. However, in August 2016 Petrobras terminated the contract two years earlier than planned prompting Diamond to file a lawsuit against Petrobras for unlawful termination.A presiding panel of appellate judges ruled on March 15, 2017, that the Ocean Valor contract would remain in effect.The rig is now in an extended standby mode until late September 2018. Following the expiry of this period, the rig will in early October 2018 start a two-year contract with Petrobras until late September 2020. The rig’s dayrate under this two-year extension will be $289,000.Further according to the report, the Ocean Valiant rig has been awarded a well-based contract from Maersk in the UK with end date set for mid-December 2019. The rig has been working for Maersk since early November 2016 until early February 2018 under 13 wells plus priced options contract.A rig that got its deal shortened was the Ocean Apex. The rig is working on a one-well contract with Woodside off Australia. The initial contract was from mid-February until early April. Diamond said that the deal was shortened by a month and would end in early March.The 2008-built jack-up rig Ocean Scepter has been stacked in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico and classified as held for sale.Also on Monday, Diamond posted a loss of $31.94 million for the fourth quarter of 2017 compared to a profit of $116.1 million in the same period of 2016.Offshore Energy Today Stafflast_img read more

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