Dearborn County bridge reopens after 4-year closure

first_imgThe bridge over west fork of Tanners Creek was reconstructed.DEARBORN COUNTY, Ind. – Collier Ridge Road reopened today after being closed for over four years for bridge reconstruction.County Bridge #55 on Collier Ridge Road over west fork of Tanners Creek has been closed since April 2010.The original bridge was constructed in 1920 and had a ten ton weight limit prior to the closure.The $1.2 million bridge is a concrete structure with two full width lanes and shoulders. Funding was 80 percent federal and 80 percent local.last_img read more

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Sunday editorial: Abrams co-sponsored bill provides public funding to private school; imperils extra curricular activites

first_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (43) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. +10 Vote up Vote down Caldwell Fan · 226 weeks ago Thank you. Very well said. Report Reply 0 replies · active 226 weeks ago +15 Vote up Vote down Terri Browning · 226 weeks ago Exactly! I’ve yet to see responsible legislation come from this group, passed or merely proposed. It seems to be simply another way to pass the blame when inevitably more chaos ensues and schools are forced to close and consolidate. Small towns will become ghost towns when schools – the lifeblood of a town – are closed or students sent to a neighboring district. Ask those districts and school leaders who’ve already been forced out. This doesn’t reduce costs. Why do people who scream so loudly about the separation of church and state feel entitled to money for support their church-based schools? We talk about the problems of obesity in our children, then take away the extracurricular activities that teach students to become aware of life-long practices that will help them maintain good health. Study after study has shown that sports, music, art, and theater improve brain function by working both halves of the brain. By missing those programs, these students will be limited in their future career and hobby choices. In an election year, why aren’t we more concerned about what the voters want?? Thanks Kyle! Keep on spreading the word. Report Reply 8 replies · active 226 weeks ago +9 Vote up Vote down Grace F · 226 weeks ago Thank you for writing this editorial and fighting for Kansas public education. Kansas can use some heroes looking out for school children rather than corporate and private interests. Report Reply 0 replies · active 226 weeks ago +13 Vote up Vote down Mimi Newman · 226 weeks ago Vote Don Shimkus, friend of public education. Replace Abrams. Report Reply 0 replies · active 226 weeks ago +10 Vote up Vote down Kris rogers · 226 weeks ago Great letter Kyle! We need legislators and legislation that will build up our state, not cripple it Report Reply 0 replies · active 226 weeks ago +7 Vote up Vote down Small Town Boy · 226 weeks ago Thank you, Mr Green! I’m saddened at the inevitability of the courts declaring this one unconstitutional (as they well should) in that we will be forced to watch these same clowns be even MORE hasty when they have to come up with another plan to prevent schools from shutting down this summer. Your editorial is very much appreciated and I’ll be interested to see if the people of Kansas can make appropriate changes in the next election. Report Reply 0 replies · active 226 weeks ago -3 Vote up Vote down Jim · 226 weeks ago Thank you for taking the time and energy to put your opinions out in a public forum, that is wonderful. So in a second opinion, Sports and Extracurricular activities should be funded by the local district and the parents regardless of size. Lunches should be funded by parents. School funding should be for English/Reading/Writing and Citizenship/History and Math/Science. FFA is doing and excellent job of raising funds through local support and training is membership. The very small amount of your tax dollars that are spend on the legislature are being spent well, they are just not being controlled the way that you would like. That is the great thing about living in the United States, we can vote, run for office and we can express our voice to the elected. Also we have the ability to move to Wisconsin or California. Report Reply 7 replies · active 226 weeks ago +4 Vote up Vote down Al Robinson · 226 weeks ago Abrams plan means no school lunch program. So we are taking food from poor kids so wealthy people can have a tax cut. This is immoral! Report Reply 0 replies · active 226 weeks ago -4 Vote up Vote down Reality Check · 226 weeks ago These Republicans today are pretty stupid. Report Reply 1 reply · active 226 weeks ago +4 Vote up Vote down Sharon Short · 226 weeks ago Right on, Kyle! I have a theory that our legislature is trying to privatize education because it is the only thing that the state constitution has to fund. If there are fewer public schools, the less money has to be spent from the state budget. Sadly, the children of our state are the ones that suffer the most. This legislature has taken us back to the stone age where the haves (the bigger, richer districts) vs. the have-nots (the smaller, rural districts). Our students deserve a quality education no matter where they live. In the past, we Kansans have had a right to be proud of our education system, ranking in the top 10 consistently. It is becoming harder to say that as things deteriorate in Topeka. Eventually, our schools will show the damaging effects of such a short-sighted group of legislators. Remember this scenario in November and vote for those that have the best interests of all our citizens at heart, young and old. I am sorry that Mr. Abrams from our district has co-sponsored this legislation but sadly, not surprised. Report Reply 0 replies · active 226 weeks ago 12Next » Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments The following is a guest editorial by Kyle Green, who is a Social Studies teacher at Oxford High School. He also coaches head boys basketball, baseball and assists with football. Kyle GreenCommentary by Kyle Green, Oxford High School — Since the demise of the 1992 school finance formula, the Kansas Legislature has had trouble developing a new school finance formula that would satisfy the masses. When I say developing a new finance formula, I mean they haven’t really tried until now. Before the Kansas Supreme Court struck down the block grants that replaced the 1992 formula, there was no movement at all from the Legislature this session to develop a new formula. However, after the Supreme Court struck down the Block Grants, a hasty piece of legislation was crafted by our own Sen. Steve Abrams and Rep. Ron Highland before they went on break a few weeks ago. HB 2741 is wrought with issues. First, it allows parents 70 percent of the per-pupil state aid that would have gone to their local school district to instead pay for private schools, including religious schools or home schools. Such accounts would be administered by the state treasurer. Students who are eligible for this are ones who have yet to start school or who have previously been enrolled in public schools.  The constitutionality of this issue will be challenged almost immediately.  The Kansas Constitution calls for suitable provisions for the funding of public education. Not private or home schools. These students are also not subject to the same requirements in terms of state testing, NAEP testing etc. There is no accountability in how taxpayer money is being spent in terms of student/teacher/school accountability. Rep. Highland asserts that it’s taxpayers money and they should spend it as they see fit.  With that line of thinking, my tax dollars pay for many highways in Kansas that I don’t drive on.  Can I request that money back and give it to my local municipality and government entity so they can use it to fix a couple of our county roads that need work?  My tax dollars also go to pay the salaries of our elected officials, including our governor.  I know our state representatives and senators don’t make a ton of money, but right now my tax dollars are not being represented in Topeka with views that myself and many other Kansans have. Another big issue with HB 2741 is that it states that no state tax dollars can be spent on extracurricular activities or food programs.  That in itself is very troubling. Study after study has shown that extracurricular activities contribute to the success of a students educational experience. The bill also says that extracurricular activities can be paid for by raising your mill levy.  The big problem with that is that raising one mill in a poor district doesn’t generate as much revenue as raising one mill in an affluent area. It creates inequities right off the bat with that concept between rich and poor districts.  By total design, the bill will kill many athletic and extracurricular programs in schools 3A and below, simply based on cost.  Kids who don’t have an opportunity to play football or be a part of FFA at their school, may simply pick up and move to the biggest school in the area who can afford to conduct these programs.  But maybe that is the goal of Sen. Abrams and Rep. Highland all along.  It will ring the death bell for many of our rural schools in particular.  It will be a way to force consolidation without passing legislation.  There are several policy changes in this bill, that quite frankly don’t belong in a school finance formula.  They are policy changes that have been bantered about the state house for several years but never gained traction.  The goal is still clear to me, to weaken public education to a point where it can be privatized. I don’t believe that is what the average Kansas citizen has asked for or wants.  At this point, the Kansas educational system is being crippled because of a massive tax plan that is not and will not work.  It’s all about political ideology right now and not what’s best for the citizens of Kansas. In a re-election year, it’s important to note that Sen. Abrams and Rep. Highland are leading the charge to defund public school activities and allow private interests to take control. Follow us on Twitter.last_img read more

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Female inmate dies at Indian River County Jail

first_imgAn investigation is underway after a female inmate at the Indian River County Jail died Monday, according to the sheriff’s office.Authorities said correctional deputies noticed the inmate, Lori Collins, 43, unresponsive in her bunk Monday morning.Correctional officers began performing CPR and gave her a Naloxone injector. She was Tun transported to Cleveland Clinic Indian River Hospital where she was pronounced dead.Jail video shower Collins walking around her cell around 9 a.m. and then she went to her bunk and moved under the covers around 10 a.m.Authorities said a preliminary investigation revealed an overdose likely caused her death.Collins was being held on a violation of probation from a previous felony charge and had been incarcerated in the Indian River County Jail for 30 days.last_img read more

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Restaurant Redesign To Bring New Look To Broad Street

first_imgRED BANK — After a lengthy vacancy, the site formerly occupied by Ashes restaurant will re-open as restaurant and bar.The site has been vacant since July of 2010.The new operation won approval at the borough planning board meeting Monday night.Developers plan to establish a primary food business and bar on the first two floors of the three-story location, utilizing about 7,118 square feet of the site on the two floors, according to information submitted to the borough planning and zoning office.Owned by the Good Fork Restaurant Group, LLC, Raritan, it has brothers Matteo and Luciano Ingrao as its owners.The two own and operate another location, their first Char, located in Raritan, and this week Matteo said he had been planning another location for some time and considered Red Bank or Livingston as possible locations.“It was calling for us to open and expand,” Ingrao said on Wednesday.Ingrao previously owned a restaurant in Freehold, and was familiar with Red Bank’s downtown. Ironically, in the early 2000s, he was approached to join a partnership with one of the then owners of Ashes, ultimately passing on the offer. “I always liked the location,” he said, noting when the spot became available he entered into negotiations with the property owner.The property owner is listed as 29 Broad Street Realty, LLC, with a Red Bank post office box as an address, and John B. Anderson II listed as manager.The restaurant’s designer, Jeff Cahill, Tinton Falls, who designed the Raritan location, said of this spot, “This one we took a more contemporary approach.” By that, he meant, “It still has very warm colors, a lot of wood,” the traditional trimmings of a steakhouse. But the Broad Street spot will have “a lot of modern accents to it,” Cahill explained.“It’s just fun and more energetic and kind of drawn for a younger demographic than your traditional steakhouse,” he explained.As part of that more modern design, one wall would lose its four windows and be replaced by two large glass ones that would reach from floor to the second floor, creating a mezzanine-style area where the building had a sort of atrium area. This, according to Mayor Pasquale Menna, was a bit of a sticking point for the borough’s historic preservation commission.Edward Zipprich, who sits on the board, borough council and the historic commission, said he was concerned about making that change. “It changes the look of the historic building, makes it even more modern,” in what is the borough’s historic district, Zipprich said. Zipprich, however, did vote on Monday to approve the plans.But Menna on Wednesday dismissed those concerns believing what Cahill and Ingrao were doing “will enhance the appearance of the old building.”“It’s going to give new definition to that whole block,” Menna said.And the look of that block has been an issue since Ashes closed nearly two summers ago. With that large building dark for as long as it has been, “It definitely had a negative impact on the businesses, both retail and restaurants, on the north side of Broad Street,” said Nancy Adams, executive director of Red Bank RiverCenter, the management and advocacy organization for the borough’s business special improvement district.Given the site takes up so much space on the corner of Broad and Mechanic Street, probably as much as what three stores would use, “”It’s very noticeable when there’s nothing in there,” Adams observed.“It has been a bleak and dark spot,” Menna acknowledged. “This is essentially a half-a-block that’s been closed for two years.”What had been there previously, had been a problem, too, officials had conceded. Menna called Ashes “a troubled and problematic night club that was in litigation all the time.” And indeed it had its share of legal battles, with state tax and alcohol officials, and among its various partners. Those battles eventually led to the business being put into receivership and eventually closing the doors.“To replace it with a sit-down restaurant, that already has a track record that is well received and is busy and popular,” is what Menna called “a no-brainer.”“We’re not looking to be a nightclub,” Ingrao said. “But on the other hand, if we have a full bar, we’re certainly not going to close, tell people to leave.”The Raritan Char does about $6 million a year in business, according to Cahill. And the owners are looking to spend approximately $2 million renovating this site. “That’s a big commitment in the restaurant industry,” especially given they don’t own the building, Cahill said.The construction, Cahill explained, is expected to commence in pretty short order and should take roughly five months to complete, with the restaurant ready for opening in the latter part of the summer.“It’s a little bit more than a paint job,” Ingrao observed.For Menna the project appears to be a boon for the borough. “Let’s focus on what’s important,” he said, indicating there will be 25-30 jobs associated with the new business and renovation of an aging structure. “You have people who want to invest a lot of money in the town and bring people into town,” he said.last_img read more

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AH Shore Casino Rises Again

first_imgBy John BurtonLongtime banquet hall back in businessATLANTIC HIGHLANDS – There was never any question about coming back after Sandy, said Bernie and Kath­leen Sweeney, who own and operate the Shore Casino, a longtime banquet hall located at the municipal harbor.“A lot of people thought we would never be able to come back,” Kathleen said. She heard that from people who live in the borough who had the chance to see the extent of the damage.Kathleen Sweeney, seated in one of the newly renovated and repaired dining rooms, and her husband own and operate Atlantic Highlands Shore Casino. Their business is bouncing back from the effects of Super Storm Sandy.Bernie dismissed those assertions. “The day after the flood I was down here with 14 brooms and my family, cleaning up and ripping up rugs,” Bernie said of the significant damage his restaurant and catering facility experienced with the late October storm and his work to get the operation up and running again.The Shore Casino, 1 Simon Lake Drive, in the center of the harbor area at the end of the borough’s First Avenue, saw a large wave make its way over the bulkhead and engulf the building, bringing more than 4 feet of water through the structure, smashing all of the building’s 27 windows, all the wall mirrors, ruining much of the equipment, flooring, carpeting and electrical wiring, among other damage.Expressing amazement, Bernie said a 44-foot powerboat washed up with the tidal surge and crashed into the building. Beer coolers, filled with beer, floated from their stationary locations behind the bars and all the chairs were in the kitchen by the time the water was done.And a truck, which had been parked behind the building, was just gone, he said, still not sure where it wound up.“We just couldn’t believe that a wave could do all that damage,” he said.“All those years of work out to sea,” offered Kathleen, in her native County Kerry Irish brogue that hasn’t waned with her more than 50 years in America.The couple has been operating the Shore Casino here for 45 years. For the past 50 years they have also owned and operated Casino in the Park, located in Jersey City, where Bernie grew up. The Jersey City location experienced some flooding from an area lake, with the basement taking on water. But the damage was pretty minimal and Casino in the Park was operating again pretty quickly.It was not like the damage they had to address at the Shore Casino, he said. Just to replace the dance floors and carpeting cost approximately $100,000. When asked about the cost of the whole job, Bernie deflected the question, explaining, “Everything here is brand new… I’m almost afraid to try and add it all up.“We probably had every insurance you can imagine. But,” he continued, taking a breath, “we didn’t have flood insurance.“Nobody ever suggested flood insurance,” to him, he said. “But it was just stupidity, I guess,” not to think of it, he added.What probably saved the building, he suspected, was that he built it with concrete and steel. “If it had been made of wood, it would’ve been gone,” he said.Bernie shrugged. “Look I’ve been through worse,” he said. “I’ve been a paratrooper; I jumped out of planes” during the Korean War in the early 1950s, he said. “I got nothing to complain about. A lot of people had it so much worse.”But Kathleen shot him a look. “Tell the truth,” she demanded. “You were so sad.”“It’s a hard thing,” he conceded. “It takes a lot out of you.”Now they’re putting on the small finishing touches before getting completely back to business in their two rooms that are capable of seating 500 and about 160, respectively. They’ve already hosted the Monmouth County Republi­cans’ annual Lincoln Dinner in February, a wedding on St. Patrick’s Day and some funeral repasts for families with longtime connections to the casino. For the future, they said, they will again host a number of local schools’ proms and are looking forward to the coming summer.“It’ll just take a little bit of time, but the harbor will be beautiful again,” he said, pronouncing it “beaut-ee-ful,” leaving no doubt of his tough Jersey City roots.last_img read more

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Got Your Back – To School

first_imgErin Croddick Avery, D.Min., is a certified educational planner and founder of Avery Educational Resources, LLC., in Fair Haven, an independent educational consulting practice that specializes in counseling students and their families throughout the college and boarding school search and application process. By Erin Croddick AveryWe have all read the research that when starting a new routine, it takes 21 days to form a new habit. For this back to school challenge, take a highlighter to your wall calendar for the first three weeks of September and do the following:Set up individual, reduced distractions study spaces for each of your learners. Buy a simple spinning caddie, available at places such as Pottery Barn Kids in the Grove West or Lairds in Fair Haven, and stock it with highlighters, pens, pencils, mechanical pencils for left-handers (they don’t smear), firm sticky tabs, erasers, sticky no tes, Mindbinders (the best flipping flashcard) and any other colorful tools that incentivize students to have fun studying.Study Hall 101. Reduced distractions – visual and sounds – is critical. According to Philosopher Bernard Lonergan, the brain responds to relaxation and that this is an indisputable condition for eureka moments. So, create a space that is work-focused but Zen at the same time.Set a kitchen timer at the same time each night for three weeks – Ask students to work for 30 minutes without asking for help. This is crucial as it will build their resilience and grit in working out obstacles on their own. For older students, reset the timer up to four times but no more in those first two weeks. And if they have completed assigned work, have them pick a book and read. It’s the discipline of showing up each day and the positive habit-forming behavior that we’re after!Find out what they love. For young learners, it may be dinosaurs, Disney, Ever After High, Star Wars, etc. Print from Google images, cut them in circles the size of a half-dollar and photocopy them onto a blank page in a path, like a board game. Get a bowl of plastic gems (think Michaels or Hobby Lobby) and for each page read or math problem solved, give him or her a gem in a bowl to place on the board. They will work twice as long with this incentive!Mark your textbook page. Students lose valuable minutes searching for their assignment. Sturdy sticky tabs get you to work instantly and can be moved ahead each day by peeling and resticking.Design a technology charging station in the kitchen. Students who take phones and devices to their bedrooms get much less sleep and sleep is vital for learning in teens and growing children. Studies reveal that taking a nap after learning an intricate concept boost retention significantly! Screen light counteracts the serotonin secretions, inhibiting one’s ability to “settle down.” So check in the devices at 8 p.m. Make your home a sanctuary.Chinese medicine advocates a proactive approach to wellness. During the changing of the seasons, wise parents slice ginger into their children’s water to help keep sore throats at bay.Blood sugar must be stabilized throughout the morning at school for optimal learning.  So think protein for breakfast, not cereal or bagels. Pumpkin seeds are superb brain food. Also, try Buckwheat groats with almond milk and honey. (P.S. It’s not a grain.)Have students make a chart with a clear goal.  They can color in the time spent each day in their study space (like the ones that measure fundraiser donations and are colored in as donations increase.) At the end of the Three-Week Got Your Back To School challenge, evaluate and celebrate if the student has reached his/her goal.Time for a celebration?  How about a sit-down to a family meal. Students who eat with their families multiple times per week report having better grades than students who do not. Food for thought!last_img read more

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Wild ride, in more ways than one, for the Bombers cross country squad

first_imgThe girl’s team placed well down the pack in the team standings, but should be applauded just for competing after the team bus broke down, stranding the entire LVR team until 15 minutes from the start of the race.The trip began to sour en route when the bus experience mechanical difficulties.Bomber runners and coaches spent three hours on the side of the highway before additional transportation could be found.The trip would have been a total disaster had it not been for the generosity of the Quesnel and Salmon Arm teams who helped transport the LVR runners to the race.Unfortunately, the girl’s running gear was locked in the bus forcing the competitors to locate alternate equipment.Adding to the woes was the fact that one of the coaches succumbed to food poisoning.As for the bus, the vehicle needed additional parts before being road worthy forcing coaches to book transportation from a Prince George shuttle company to get the competitors back to Nelson.The driver was a former Nelsonite who came to the rescue of the Bomber team. The L.V. Rogers Bombers boys overcame winter-like conditions and bus problems to finish 14th overall at the B.C. High School Cross Country Championships held Saturday in snowy conditions in Prince George.The boy’s race, run after a dump of snow in the Central Interior City, attracted more than 250 runners from throughout the province and was open to all grades.”The boys team placed a very impressive 14th out of 30 teams,” said a team spokesperson.Grade 9 Micah May led the Bombers who finished 36th overall in the senior boy’s division.Levi Smith was the second best LVR in 135th followed by Digby Benner, who finished 160 overall.last_img read more

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Wranglers knock off defending champion Dynamiters to clinch 2016 KIJHL Title

first_imgThe win gives 100 Mile House a 4-1 decision in the League Championship Series and the first KIJHL title in team history.The contest appeared to be heading for extra time until Brady Ward sent Wrangler fans into the next atmosphere scoring the winning goal with under four minutes remaining in the game.The score was tied 1-1 after Brett Harris scored a power play goal in the first period for 100 Mile House and Eric Buckley replied in the second for the defending KIJHL champs.For the second straight game the Dynamiters out shot the Wranglers, 41-32 in Game five.However, Steeves proved to be the difference as the Red Deer native continuously frustrated the Kimberley snipers, holding the Nitros to 10 goals in the five-game series.100 Mile House now prepares to respresent the KIJHL at the Cyclone Taylor Cup next week in Victoria. In 2015, Kimberley netminder Tyson Brouwer was “All World” in backstopping the Nitros to the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League championship.This year is was Zane Steeves turn to lead his 100 Mile House Wranglers to the top of the KIJHL.Steeves turned aside 40 of 41 shots to lead the Wranglers to a 2-1 victory over the Dynamiters in Game five of the KIJHL best-of-seven series Thursday night in 100 Mile House.last_img read more

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EU, DBSA launch R1.5bn infrastructure fund

first_img14 March 2014 The European Union (EU) and the Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA) have launched a €100-million (R1.5-billion) programme to provide grant funding in support of loans for essential infrastructure projects in South Africa and the southern African region.​ “The establishment of this fund could not have come at a better time,” DBSA CEO Patrick Dlamini said at the launch of the Infrastructure Investment Programme for South Africa (IIPSA) in Midrand, Johannesburg on Thursday. While the South African government had prioritised infrastructure development as a catalyst for tackling poverty and unemployment, Dlamini said, adequate infrastructure funding had become “a key constraint to faster economic growth and social inclusion both in South Africa and in the SADC region. “We therefore view this programme as a strategic intervention to fund South Africa’s national and regional infrastructure projects, especially at the critical initial stages to prepare projects to bankability.” EU Ambassador to South Africa Roeland van de Geer said the fund would provide innovative financing that blended EU grants with long-term financing from participating South African and European development finance institutions. “It also aims to attract private financing into projects with a high socio-economic return by enhancing the financial feasibility and project quality and/or by reducing the risk associated with such projects,” Van de Geer said. According to a joint EU-DBSA statement, projects to be supported will be selected from a list of priority projects established by an IIPSA committee, and will be directly linked to the priorities of the South African government, EU-SA priorities for cooperation, and the regional infrastructure strategy of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). Priority sectors will include energy, transport, water and environment, ICT and social infrastructure. “A Request for Proposals will be issued in early April 2014 inviting potential recipients to propose infrastructure investments whose development would be enhanced by the use of IIPSA grant funding alongside other forms of financing,” the statement read. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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