Where did that whisky A Go-Go?

first_imgWhen his tenant’s rent went unpaid, a Scottish landlord accepted nearly £40,000 worth of stolen whisky as payment. Kenneth McLean, 48, from Avonbridge near Falkirk, was caught with 57 bottles of rare malt whisky hidden in his loft after police received a tip off.The whisky had gone missing from a storage vault in Grangemouth used by drinks giant Diageo, last July. Among those recovered were nine bottles of 37-year-old Port Ellen, worth almost £2,500 each, and seven bottles of Brora 1977 worth £12,250 in total.When Mr McLean was arrested he claimed that he had bought the whisky, planning to keep it for ten years and sell them on at a profit. However, none of the bottles were duty paid, so they could not legally be sold in the UK. It later turned out that McLean had spoken to social workers who were compiling a report, telling them he had accepted the whisky as rent and had been “wilfully blind” to the fact they were probably stolen.After admitting to the criminal offence of reset – the term for possession of stolen goods in Scottish law – Mr McLean was given a community sentence and ordered to complete 200 hours of unpaid work.Defending McLean was solicitor advocate Martin Morrow, who said of his client: “He acknowledges that he has been extremely foolish.”stolen whisky landlords tenant’s rent Whisky as rent payment April 21, 2017The NegotiatorWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Agencies & People » Where did that whisky A Go-Go? previous nextAgencies & PeopleWhere did that whisky A Go-Go?The Negotiator21st April 20170474 Viewslast_img read more

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Program Assistant 2

first_imgLocationAlbany Campus, Albany, OR Physical Requirements and Working Conditions: Required DocumentsRequired DocumentsResumeAcademic TranscriptCover LetterOptional DocumentsU. S. Veteran Proof of Honorable Discharge DD-214, Copy 4Academic Transcript 2Academic Transcript 3 Special Notes to Applicants: This is a Temporary, renewable dependent upon continuation offunding position.This position requires written and oral bilingual skills inEnglish and Spanish for the translation of public documents andwebsites.As a condition of employment, all new employees are required to becompensated via direct deposit.LBCC is an Equal Opportunity Educator and Employer.LBCC offers a pay incentive to eligible employees who demonstrateproficiency in conversational Spanish when evaluated and formallycertified by a college-approved professional or agency. Eligibilityto apply for and receive bilingual pay incentives for Spanish andlanguages other than English are subject to the provisions ofAdministrative Rule 6025-06. For more detailed information, pleasereview theLBCC Bilingual Pay Incentive Administrative Policy Provides services equally to the tri-county area served by the ELHub, which includes Linn, Benton & Lincoln counties.Coordinates with a steering committee of partners and local,culturally specific, organizations to bring parent voice to thework of the EL Hub.Develops relationships with culturally specific community-basedorganizations to support the EL Hub’s delivery of equitableservices for children and families.Schedules and leads meetings with parent focus groups and/or parentcafes throughout Linn, Benton and Lincoln Counties, facilitationmay be needed in English and/or Spanish.Recruits and supports parents for the EL Hub Governing Board.Attends monthly meetings of the EL Hub Governing Board, andprovides updates of Parent Engagement issues and activities, asneeded.Represents the EL Hub at various community meetings that focus onparent engagement.Builds relationships with Head Start, Early Childhood SpecialEducation, school district operated preschool program, and anyother publicly funded preschool programs to facilitatecollaboration and the coordination of enrollment.Serves as a liaison between families, providers, and communityresources for families, and promote community resources, events andrelated activities to families.Understands the needs and circumstances of the region’s prioritypopulations, and plans recruitment and enrollment strategies thatpromote equity and inclusion.Works closely with Preschool Promise providers to troubleshootrecruitment, optimize family fit, and ensures full programenrollment.Works collaboratively with the Hub director and other designatedHub staff to develop and execute a publicly funded preschoolrecruitment strategy that focuses on the region’s prioritypopulations as defined in the Hub region’s Early Care and EducationSector Plan.Participates in resource fairs, brochure development, social mediacampaigns, local advertisement and other opportunities to marketparticipating publicly funded preschool programs.Manages regional recruitment plan and activities, enrollmentsystems and waitlists, and collaborates with other preschoolprograms regarding recruitment.Ensure full enrollment in Preschool Promise program and otherparticipating publicly funded preschool program, track slots andwork to quickly fill any vacancies.Works closely with Preschool Promise providers to troubleshootrecruitment, optimize family fit, and ensures full programenrollment.Develops consent forms, data sharing agreements, and Memoranda ofUnderstanding to allow for data sharing among partnerorganizations.Responsible for the complete and accurate collection, entry,reporting and maintenance of data, records and reports.Connects providers and the families they serve to resources andprograms that serve family needs (ex. housing and utility support,mental health services, Inclusive Partners, and EarlyIntervention).Maintains knowledge of and connection to parent resourceinformation and connect parents to resources such as 211 andPollywog.Encourage parent participation in programs and communityresources.Maintain family and provider confidentiality, at all times.Keep accurate, complete, and FERPA / HIPAA -compliant provider andchild/family records.Facilitate data collection and analysis for the purposes ofimproving program quality.Performs other related duties as assigned. Division/Department:Parenting Education Full-time or Part-timeFull-time, 1.0 FTE, Fiscal Year (Contracted with Benefits)Temporary, renewable-dependent upon continuation of funding Job Summary: Serves as the link between the Early Learning Hub (EL Hub) andfamilies throughout Linn, Benton and Lincoln Counties. Coordinatesand facilitates the Hub’s engagement activities with children andfamilies from all communities served by the Hub and engages withculturally specific community-based organizations as partners inthe delivery of services to children and families. Plans,coordinates, implements and organizes the recruitment, eligibility,selection, placement functions, and meets and maintains 100% offunded enrollment for assigned programs in accordance with parentchoice, pre-established prioritizing criteria and ELD regulationsand guidelines. Essential Duties: Applicant Instructions: * If you selected other above, please specify the website orother resource from which you learned of the position.(Open Ended Question) Position Title:Program Assistant 2 Posting Date:01/04/2021 Posting Number:0601070-C Position Type:Classified Learned physical skill is required to operate computer software andoffice equipment. Must be able to communicate effectively in personand over the phone. Must be able to lift light to medium weightmaterials (10 to 25 lbs.).Work is normally performed in an office setting with minimalexposure to health and safety hazards. Regular travel to communitymeetings and events within Linn, Benton and Lincoln Counties isrequired. Substantial time is spent working at a computer. May berequired to work occasional evenings and/or weekends. Supplemental QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*). Number of hours/week:40 Salary Grade16 Proposed Start Date: Closing Date: Required Qualifications: Knowledge of local community resources and the Collective ImpactModel is preferred.Experience working with families with multiple risk factors ispreferred. Open Until Filled:Yes Salary/Rate Preferred Qualifications: Starting annual salary is $ 41,161 for a 1.0 FTE, 245 position daycontract, plus comprehensive benefit. Please complete the online application and upload or attach thefollowing required documents:1) Resume2) Cover Letter3) Academic Transcript(if needed to meet requiredqualifications)Transcripts from a non-U.S. college or university must beaccompanied by an international credential agency evaluation.Please see “Academic Transcript Information” on the EmploymentOpportunities home page for more information and a list of agencieswhich perform this service.Applications are reviewed for minimum qualifications. In order tobe considered, your application must clearly show you meet theminimum qualifications for this position.U.S. Veterans must attach proof of honorable discharge (FormDD-214, Copy 4) to their application to qualify for veteran’sconsideration. Posting * How did you learn about this position? Please select one.Mid-Valley Sunday NewspaperLebanon Express NewspaperOregonian NewspaperLatinos in Higher EducationHERC-Higher Education Recruitment Consortiumindeed.comChronicle of Higher Education OnlineState Employment DepartmentLBCC Employment Opportunities WebsiteEugene Register Guard NewspaperOther Online Website (specify below)Other (specify below) Education and Experience: Position requires an AA/AS inChild Development, Early Childhood Education, Human Development,Social Science or a related field, plus a minimum of one-yearfull-time experience in early childhood education, education, humanservices, or a related area, or a combination of education andexperience that enables full performance of the position.Demonstrated experience in activities that involve working withnonprofits, governmental agencies, businesses, underrepresentedpopulations and/or other community stakeholders is highlydesirable.Licenses and Certificates: Requires a valid Oregon driver’slicense and access to reliable transportation. Must meet andmaintain a driving record that complies with the college driver’sstatus guidelines.Knowledge and Skills: Requires good English and grammarskills. Must have well developed written, verbal and communicationskills. Must have personal computer, word processing, and recordkeeping skills. Requires written and oral bilingual skills inEnglish and Spanish and bi-cultural awareness and sensitivity.Bilingual abilities required for translation of public documentsand websites.Abilities: Must be able to independently perform duties ofthe position efficiently and effectively. Must be able tocommunicate with parents and partners in an ethical, respectful,and caring manner. Must be able to present information to group inEnglish and Spanish. Requires the ability to organize, plan andprioritize duties in order to meet schedules and time lines. Mustbe able to travel to and from locations within the service area.Must be able to follow written directions, obtain online drivingdirections, and/or read a map. Must be able to work respectfullywith individuals of all cultures, backgrounds, perspectives, andabilities.last_img read more

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Exam Labour

first_imgAntonella Magnani, 28, recently sat her final law exam while in labour in a hospital delivery room, after college authorities concluded that giving birth was not a valid reason for missing the exam. In her final hours of labour, a team of eight examiners arrived to question her on exam topics such as marketing and public rights. She was reportedly “very calm”, even when the contractions started to become more regular – and gave birth to a daughter, Giulia, two hours after the examiners had left the room.ARCHIVE: 4th week TT 2003last_img read more

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Drug users found outside Univ accommodation

first_imgTwo drug users were found outside University College accommodation last Sunday afternoon.Concerned students have immediately informed the police and the porters, but the two men fled the scene before the University Security services or the police arrived.Needles and other drug paraphernalia were left lying around by the entrance.At between 5 and 6pm last Sunday night, two men walked into Logic Lane and sat in the entrance of Durham Buildings, a student accommodation block. They proceeded to prepare and take the drugs in the entrance, as puzzled Univ students looked on.Tim Fowler, the second year medic who called the police described how the men “sat preparing the drugs for around five minutes” before proceeding to inject themselves with what onlookers assumed to be heroin. At this point Fowler called the police for the first time. He commented “it is a relatively narrow entrance, people could have got past but nobody really wanted to.”Fowler added “They were there for another thirty-five minutes and I phoned them [the police] again, but still nobody came.”During this time, it is understood that the college porters were also contacted by several students. The porters then passed on the message to the University Security services, who are used for the protection of many of the University buildings. Representatives arrived approximately twenty minutes after the drug users had left, which was around an hour after the phone calls were made to the porters.One student commented, “The police said it wasn’t an emergency, and gave us a non-emergency number to call…I normally feel very secure at Univ, especially as the Logic Lane gates are shut quite soon after it gets dark.”The Thames Valley Police later arrived at the scene, but were unable to locate the men as they didn’t know what the men looked like.Alice Heath, JCR President said, “Security is definitely not a general problem at Univ – we have keypads on every external and internal door, the gates to Logic Lane are locked at 7pm and our porters are extremely vigilant and trusted by everyone in college. I’ve never had anyone report any worries about security at Univ.”last_img read more

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Correspondence: COVID-19 testing data: letter to the Office for Statistics Regulation

first_imgThe chair of the Office for Statistics Regulation wrote to the Department of Health and Social Care on 11 May about the presentation of statistics about coronavirus (COVID-19) testing.The department’s response sets out the changes it’s making to the reporting of test statistics.last_img

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University throws 100 Days Dance to celebrate class of 2018’s remaining time as students

first_imgSenior Class Council hosted its second annual “100 Days Dance” in the Dahnke Ballroom in Duncan Student Center on Thursday night. The dance marks the final 100 days of school at Notre Dame for the class of 2018, and seniors were invited to join in reminiscing on their 3 1/2 years together. Chris Collins | The Observer The class of 2018 gathered in the Duncan Student Center on Thursday to celebrate the last 100 days of their time as Notre Dame students.Senior Class Council secretary Matthew Peters said he was excited for the class of 2018 to have access to the newly-completed Duncan Student Center for the second installment of this dance.“The space is unbelievably classy and the facilities are top-notch, so moving to Duncan seemed like the right move — it was a no brainer,” Peters said. “Furthermore, we believe that an on-campus venue would continue to bridge the gap between the senior off-campus community and those still on campus.”The dance, which overlooked Notre Dame Stadium, featured a DJ, professional photographer, photo booth and hors d’oeuvres such as chocolate-covered strawberries, mini tacos, pot stickers and cupcakes.In addition to the prime location, Peters said he hoped the free shuttle service offered for the dance would attract off-campus seniors to the event.“We decided to provide a free shuttle service to safely and effectively draw off-campus seniors to Duncan the night of,” Peters said. “Our bus service makes a loop between Duncan, Irish Row to the east of campus, Eddy Street Commons to the south of campus and Dublin Village to the west of campus.”The main purpose of this event, Peters said, was for classmates to reflect on the memories made throughout their time at Notre Dame as their senior year begins to wind down.“More than anything, our goal with this event was to celebrate our last 3 1/2 years together at the greatest university in the world, all while remembering that our days here are numbered,” Peters said. “It is our hope that through this event, our classmates truly recognize and cherish every last day, every last experience and every last encounter at Our Lady’s University.”Senior Olivia Mikkelsen said the dance was a welcome burst of camaraderie in a nerve-wracking time for many members of the class of 2018.“I think it’s a scary, but exciting, time,” she said. “I feel like that’s a common theme around most seniors, but having a 100 Days Dance is a great way to bring everyone together and really have a collective experience of being seniors and being together and having this.”Senior Shane Ryan said the dance was the perfect opportunity to bring together students from many different groups in the senior class.“It’s great to celebrate getting through Notre Dame for four years with all these people,” he said. “People have different groups along the ways and it’s beautiful to see everything converge when you’re seniors and people all kind of finally get to know each other and all of a sudden you just have all these friends coming out of the woodworks and having a really great time.”Peters said the event took a considerable deal of planning, a duty made easier by the help of his Class Council task force — made up of seniors Sarah Ritten, Kelly Smith, Thomas Walsh, Alexandra Snyder, Andrea Bae and John Ahn — whose dedication he said helped make this dance possible.More important than the details of the dance, however, were the members of the class of 2018 and their memories of Notre Dame, Peters said.“Our measure of success does not come through ticket sales or the number of chocolate covered strawberries eaten,” he said. “Our measure of success will be the memories made among classmates — memories that we hope will last a lifetime.”Tags: 100 Days Dance, class of 2018, senior class councillast_img read more

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VCET to collaborate with incubator network

first_imgVCET to Collaborate With Business Incubator Network to Promote EconomicDevelopment StatewideSenator Patrick Leahy, Governor James Douglas, and University of Vermontpresident Daniel Mark Fogel announced March 29, 2004, the launch of the Vermont Center forEmerging Technologies, a multi-faceted initiative that will play acrucial role in diversifying Vermont’s economy and boosting economicdevelopment in the state.Senator Leahy secured an appropriation of $1 million to help launch thecenter, which will be located in Farrell Hall on the Trinity Collegecampus of the University of Vermont.VCET is a targeted small business development program designed to fosterthe success of new high-growth, high technology firms in Vermont. Theinitiative is designed to leverage UVM’s scientific and technologicalexpertise and specialty laboratory facilities and equipment, linkingclient companies to key faculty at the university and other academicinstitutions in the state; to an extensive network of private sectormentors and advisors; to private investment capital resources; and tostaff and student interns from the state’s academic institutions.While the initial VCET site will offer office space for select clientcompanies, plans call for a second phase of development that will provideaccess to a larger real estate component with flexible multi-tenantoffice, laboratory, and light production space. VCET also intends tocollaborate with a wide-ranging network of existing and planned businessincubators in Vermont to promote business formation and economicdevelopment statewide.“Our state faces many challenges, but perhaps none more important thanmaintaining our leadership in innovation and high technology,” said Leahy.“The Vermont Center for Emerging Technologies and the other Vermontincubators will tap the technology potential that we have in Vermont andtransform that into jobs.”“This center is a critical catalyst for Vermont’s economic developmentefforts,” said Governor Douglas. “It takes the innovative concepts ofVermonters and turns them into quality jobs.”“UVM has a key role to play as a driver of economic development inVermont,” said Fogel. “VCET will enable us, for the first time, to trulyharness the power of our research enterprise, the talent of our facultyand students, and the array of high tech labs and equipment we offer tohelp build a robust economy throughout Vermont and create jobs forVermonters.”“Vermont’s statewide higher education community is one of its strongestassets,” said L. Fred Hackett, vice chairman of Hackett Valine & MacDonaldand Yankee Insurance Group and chair of the VCET board. “VCET will enableus to tap the power of that resource for the benefit of Vermonters acrossthe state. With UVM’s research funding growing each year and the combinedsupport of the business and higher ed communities and state and federalgovernment, the time is right to move forward with this vitally importantenterprise.”Steep Rise in Research Dollars at UVMUVM has seen a steep rise in the amount of research funding it hasreceived from federal grants and contracts in recent years, with dollarsrising from just over $60 million in 1998 to nearly $120 million in 2003.With the VCET support infrastructure in place, this research shouldpresent significant technology transfer opportunities, resulting in newproducts and new companies to bring them to market, said Frances Carr,vice president for research and graduate studies at UVM.“In the past three years, UVM has issued nearly 80 invention disclosuresand licensed 26 patents,” she said. “VCET should help us build on thatstrong base and see a significant amount of new activity.”According to the Association of University Technology Managers, over 450companies were created nationally via technology transfer from universityresearch efforts in fiscal year 2000, with eight of ten in geographicproximity to the institution where the founding technologies werecreated.VCET and other business incubator projects are part of the Douglasadministration’s comprehensive strategy to foster business innovation andgrowth in Vermont. To date $500,000 in state funding has beenappropriated to support incubator initiatives, and Governor Douglas isrequesting an additional $125,000 in his FY05 budget specifically forVCET.In addition to VCET, other technology incubators in the state include theBennington Microtechnology Center; Middlebury College’s Digital Bridges;Diamond Edge Technology Incubator in Windsor; the Marlboro CollegeTechnology Center in Brattleboro; the National Center for the Study ofCounter-Terrorism and CyberCrime in Northfield; the SpringfieldSustainable Technology Business Incubator in Springfield; and the VermontBusiness Resource Center and Technology Business Incubator in Randolph.VCET will be a key component of a UVM-based umbrella organization calledthe Vermont Innovation Alliance for Technology and Entrepreneurship. Thealliance, a partnership that includes the state’s economic developmententities, its academic institutions, and groups like the VermontTechnology Council, is designed to serve as a portal to UVM, acceleratingtechnology commercialization, promoting entrepreneurship, and enhancingresearch effectiveness by breaking down institutional barriers andimproving communications and collaboration between businesses, government,and academic institutions statewide.The new Vermont Business Center, a joint effort of UVM’s School ofBusiness Administration and its Continuing Education division, will serveas educational partner for VCET. VBC is developing a specialentrepreneurship curriculum to support VCET.The Vermont Center for Emerging Technologies will be developed as aseparately incorporated not-for-profit entity (501©3) closely affiliatedwith UVM and other strategic partners around the state.For more information about VCET and the services it offers, call (800)639-3188.last_img read more

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Police Combat Operations in the Waters of Rio de Janeiro

first_imgBy Dialogo January 07, 2011 Good Info Cutting across the waves, the speedboats of the Air and Maritime Group of the Military Police of Rio de Janeiro State continue at high speed through the waters of Guanabara Bay in search of suspicious vessels. Heavily armed, the officers traverse the main locations during lengthy maritime combat patrols. Their actions are carried out unannounced, and the importance of their missions increases every day with the effective fight against crime put into place by the Rio Military Police. Throughout the year, thousands of vessels pass through Guanabara Bay. The majority of them remain anchored while waiting to dock at the port in the city of Rio de Janeiro. However, some carry illegal cargo, such as drugs, weapons, and ammunition, tossed from the ships to drug dealers and smugglers. It is believed that a significant portion of all illicit goods that reach the slums of Rio de Janeiro comes by sea. In order to suppress these activities, the Military Police of Rio de Janeiro State have an Air and Maritime Group (GAM) in the city of Niterói. Its maritime policing core has the mission of fighting environmental crimes, drug trafficking, and weapons smuggling and protecting Petrobras’s docked oil platforms and the ships of the Brazilian Navy’s base, preventing sabotage and terrorist attacks, like the attack on the USS Cole in Yemen, from happening in Rio de Janeiro. The GAM operates four cabin speedboats, 43, 36, 32, and 26 feet in length, and six semi-rigid inflatable speedboats. Their crews are armed with FAL 7.62 and M4 5.56 rifles. These missions are very complex and dangerous. “Besides all the risks associated with police work, we also run nautical risks: shipwreck, drowning, ailments caused by exposure to the sun and the sea, accidents with semi-submerged rocks and while diving,” stated Capt. Joelmir dos Santos, head of the Maritime Policing Core. The ostentatious patrols carried out by the GAM have already engaged in combat innumerable times, as well as conducting maritime pursuit with the assistance of AS350 Squirrel helicopters from the same unit. In their area of activity, the speedboats board suspicious vessels. In Rio de Janeiro there are several roads near the sea, and some slums, such as those on Governador Island. Therefore, patrolling Guanabara Bay is as important as surveillance of the roads that lead to the city. “The task of policing includes supporting the various agencies and battalions in the coastal areas of Rio de Janeiro State, assisting in the environmental operations of the Forest Police Battalion of the Military Police of Rio de Janeiro State (Polícia Militar do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, PMERJ), the State Environment Secretariat, the Brazilian Environment and Natural Resources Institute (Instituto Brasileiro do Meio Ambiente e dos Recursos Naturais, IBAMA), the State Environment Institute (Instituto Estadual do Ambiente, INEA), and the Brazilian Navy,” Joelmir said. Important liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminals and various infrastructure under construction are located in Guanabara Bay, all under the responsibility of Petrobrás/Transpetro. This area also houses the anchorage of the Transpetro ships, where the police must keep alert for fishermen who tie up at the ships’ sterns, near the rudder and propeller, posing a risk to the offenders themselves as well as to maritime security. The GAM’s Maritime Policing Core participates annually in simulations of accidents and sabotage, since it is included in the National Plan for Port Security through the National Commission for Port Public Safety (Comissão Nacional de Segurança Pública dos Portos, COMPORTOS), in which it represents Rio de Janeiro State. With the increase in maritime policing activities, a new base has been set up at Angra dos Reis and will be responsible for all patrolling, inspection, and suppression activities in that area.last_img read more

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Nor’easter Could Dump 2-4 Inches of Snow on Long Island

first_imgA potential Nor’easter could briefly interrupt the first full week of spring and dump several inches of snow on Long Island Tuesday into Wednesday, forecasters said.The National Weather Service in Upton is monitoring the path of the storm, but at this point forecasters believe the coastal storm will remain far enough south that it won’t directly hit the Island. That means snowfall amounts could come in between 2-3 inches across most of Nassau and Suffolk counties, and up to 4 inches in the East End. “We’re not looking at what we call a significant snowfall” which is considered six inches or more, said NWS meteorologist Brian Ciemnecki. But the forecast could change significantly depending on the track of the storm. Tuesday’s forecast calls for a 50-percent chance of light snow after 1 p.m. with temperatures hovering above freezing. The likelihood of precipitation is greater from 7 p.m. to 4 a.m. Wednesday, with snow accumulation of 1 to 3 inches possible, forecasters said. Wednesday is expected to be breezy with mostly sunny skies later in the day and temps in the high 30s. The mercury is expected to dip into the low 20s in the evening. Temperatures should kick back into the 40s on Thursday and remain in the 50s the rest of the week. Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York last_img read more

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Senate panel to consider NAFCU-backed reg relief bill today

first_imgThe Senate Banking Committee today will mark up a NAFCU-backed regulatory reform bill that includes provisions offering relief under the member business lending cap and certain Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) disclosure requirements.NAFCU Executive Vice President of Government Affairs and General Counsel Carrie Hunt sent a letter to the committee ahead of the hearing in support of the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief and Consumer Protection Act (S. 2155).Hunt commended the legislation’s bipartisan support and inclusion of consumer protections while also reducing the regulatory burden credit unions face.The mark-up, which will also include a vote to advance the Fed chair nomination of Jerome Powell to the full Senate, begins at 10 a.m. Eastern. continue reading » 10SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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