Euro bailout fund rejig is set for March

first_img Show Comments ▼ Euro bailout fund rejig is set for March EUROZONE finance ministers called yesterday for an increase in the effective lending capacity of the currency bloc’s rescue fund, but German finance minister Wolfgang Schaeuble said there was no urgency and it would be March before a firm plan was in place.Schaeuble said that with bond markets calmer, there was no rush to take action now and work was being prepared for a late March EU summit.“There will not be results today, the market developments in the last week have, thank God, taken any urgency out of these discussions,” he said.Schaeuble’s comments came as Eurozone finance ministers gathered in Brussels yesterday to thrash out proposals for a regional rescue package ahead of a European Council meeting next week.The meeting came as the European Financial Stability Facility (EFSF), Europe’s main bailout fund, said that it had appointed financial advisers for its first sale of debt on Monday.Citigroup, HSBC and Societe Generale will advise on the deal, which will involve an auction of €3 to €5bn of debt in order to fund the €85bn bailout of Ireland.At the meeting of finance ministers, Holland’s Jan Kees de Jager indicated that the Eurozone’s more stable countries could be willing to fund an expansion in the region’s rescue fund, something that has so far been blocked by France and Germany.“If needed, we will stand ready with an emergency fund to assist a country that needs it,” he said. But he added: “The emergency fund, only, will not be a solution, we need fiscal consolidation.” Share whatsapp KCS-content More From Our Partners Supermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.org whatsapp Monday 17 January 2011 9:01 pm Tags: NULLlast_img read more

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Peter Hutton gets additional responsibilities in Facebook restructuring

first_img Brands Chennai Super Kings Suresh Raina appointed as Brand Ambassador for BharatPe Sports Business : Adidas launches ‘What’s One More’ campaign to celebrate athletes preparing for Tokyo Olympics RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook has given Peter Hutton the additional responsibility of overseeing sports partnerships in EMEA, Latin America and APAC.The social media platform has announced a restructuring of its sports team, promoting Dan Reed as vice-president of global sports and media partnerships. Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter IPL 2020 : Mumbai Indians captain Rohit Sharma signs with Oakley eyewear by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeGrammarlyImprove Your Spelling With This Helpful Browser ExtensionGrammarlyUndoCapital One ShoppingThis hack can uncover JOANN discounts you don’t know aboutCapital One ShoppingUndo24/7 SportsIt’s Amazing To See How These NBA Stars Have Changed Since College24/7 SportsUndoReed’s new role will now go beyond sport to manage two other teams – Global media Accounts and media community development.This will mean that Hutton, Director of Global Sports Partnerships and Programming, and Brandon Gayle, Director of Global sports partnerships and Solutions, will take on additional responsibilities in the sports team.Hutton, along with leading Facebook’s sports programming, will now oversee day-to-day sports partnerships in EMEA, Latin America and APAC. Gayle, in addition to leading North America sports partnerships, will now manage the global partner solutions team. Both will continue to report to Reed.A former Eurosport CEO, Hutton had joined Facebook in January last year.Also Read: Tokyo 2020 : Sports Ministry allocates 100 Cr for athletes preparation under TOPS Previous articleadidas takes shoe science to next level with Alphaedge 4DNext articleManchester City faces financial fair play sanctions amidst UEFA investigation Kunal DhyaniSports Tech enthusiast, he reports on Sports Tech industry and writes on sports products. IPL 2021: CSK’s captain MS Dhoni takes stake in start-up whick makes Helicopter Shot Choclates and Beverages Sports BusinessBrands Brands Brands WWE adds several matches for tonight’s episode of Monday Night RAW Brands Sachin Tendulkar says, ‘spare a thought for Barbers’ in Gillette’s new Campaign Brands YourBump15 Actors That Hollywood Banned For LifeYourBump|SponsoredSponsoredUndoDaily FunnyFemale Athlete Fails You Can’t Look Away FromDaily Funny|SponsoredSponsoredUndoPost FunThese Twins Were Named “Most Beautiful In The World,” Wait Until You See Them TodayPost Fun|SponsoredSponsoredUndoMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity Week|SponsoredSponsoredUndoDefinitionTime Was Not Kind To These 28 CelebritiesDefinition|SponsoredSponsoredUndoMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStory|SponsoredSponsoredUndo Adidas to play with more heart and harness the power of the game in new film narrated by athlete and icon, Siya Kolisi TAGSFacebookGlobal Sports PartnershipsPeter HuttonSocial MediaSports Partnerships SHARE Brands Facebook Twitter Brands By Kunal Dhyani – January 5, 2019 Brands PV Sindhu’s Stayfree digital campaign breaks record, clocks 12+ million views Cricket Business : Nike declines to renew, BCCI invites bids for Team Kit Sponsor and Merchandise Partner rights Brands Peter Hutton gets additional responsibilities in Facebook restructuring Brands Indian women cricket team and 52 other stars feature in Nike’s film, narrated by World cup star Megan Rapinoe last_img read more

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United Bank for Africa PLC (UBA.ng) HY2014 Presentation

first_imgUnited Bank for Africa PLC (UBA.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2014 presentation results for the half year.For more information about United Bank for Africa PLC (UBA.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the United Bank for Africa PLC (UBA.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: United Bank for Africa PLC (UBA.ng)  2014 presentation results for the half year.Company ProfileUnited Bank of Africa Plc is a financial services institution in Nigeria offering banking products and services to the personal, commercial and corporate sectors. The company provides a full-service product offering ranging from transactional accounts, overdrafts and mortgage finance to domiciliary deposits, treasury services, asset management services, bonds, money market deposits and risk management solutions. United Bank of Africa Plc supports the agricultural sector through an agricultural credit support scheme which includes agro processing, an outgrowers scheme, equipment and mechanisation scheme and a tree crops replacement scheme. Founded in 1948, the company  now has an extensive network of some 1 000 branches in the major towns and cities of Nigeria. Its head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. United Bank of Africa Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Zambia Sugar Plc (ZMSG.zm) HY2021 Interim Report

first_imgZambia Sugar Plc (ZMSG.zm) listed on the Lusaka Securities Exchange under the Agri-industrial sector has released it’s 2021 interim results for the half year.For more information about Zambia Sugar Plc reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations visit the Zambia Sugar Plc company page on AfricanFinancials.Indicative Share Trading Liquidity The total indicative share trading liquidity for Zambia Sugar Plc (ZMSG.zm) in the past 12 months, as of 1st June 2021, is US$67.47K (ZMW1.47M). An average of US$5.62K (ZMW122.32K) per month.Zambia Sugar Plc Interim Results for the Half Year DocumentCompany ProfileZambia Sugar Plc is the largest sugar producer in Zambia. The company has interests in growing sugar cane and producing raw sugar and specialty sugar products for domestic and export markets. Zambia Sugar produces sugar products under the Whitespoon brand name, and exports niche-market sugars countries in the European Union. The sugar enterprise has cane estates and a sugar factor in Nakambala in the South West Province of Zambia. Its total annual sugar production capacity ranges from 200 000 tons to 450 000 tons. Zambia Sugar is a subsidiary of Illovo Sugar which in turn is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Associated British Foods Plc. Illovo produces raw and refined for local and export markets with sugar cane grown by independent out-growers. Zambia Sugar Plc is listed on the Lusaka Securities Exchangelast_img read more

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Eddie Jones on his coaching methods

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS As we were talking he kept putting his hand on my forearm. I was asking about what he thinks you need to be successful and he said it’s about establishing relationships. He said, “I don’t know you and I’m trying to establish a relationship with you right now”.That’s a good reinforcement of something you need and getting that emotional attachment. I’ve been reading another book about selling and it said the most successful salespeople are usually the people who touch.RW: How did you feel with the news stories around Dylan Hartley’s book and you?EJ: By coincidence, I arranged to meet Dylan for a coffee on the Sunday (of that week) because I hadn’t seen him for a while. I always thought we had a good relationship and think we still have.I went to his place before Northampton-Wasps, he was honest about it and I don’t worry about these things at all. With any book, you can pick something out to make a headline and from what Dylan said 90% of it is positive.RW: If you could pick the brain of any coach – alive or dead – who would it be?EJ: I’ve been lucky, I’ve chatted to Alex Ferguson… He wasn’t a coach but Douglas Jardine (England cricket captain on the ‘Bodyline’ Ashes tour of Australia in 1932-33). He changed the whole mindset of the team; England teams were quite conservative and he changed the whole mindset. We used that to shape our tour of Australia in 2016.RW: Are coaches or referees the biggest obstacle to quick rugby in the Premiership?EJ: Referees, and I mean that in a positive way. The referees are there to referee the laws of the game and the laws should be refereed in a relatively strict way or we allow the game to go away from the laws. We’ve seen that in the last four or five years and that’s why we’ve seen so much kicking.Sometimes there will be 30 penalties a game. The Northampton-Wasps game had a lot of penalties but it was a great game of rugby – there was great transition and a great contest at the breakdown.The refs are finding their way (with the breakdown law application) but they’re going in the right direction. I think they could go harder; we need to keep players on their feet.RW: If you could change one law, what would it be?EJ: The law I’d experiment with is that the only player in the defensive side who is allowed to use their hands (at the breakdown) is the tackler. That would keep everyone else up; the second man coming in would have to stay on their feet and clean. It would also lift the height of the ruck, which I think we need to do because of the injury implications.RW: What if it was a double tackle?EJ: That’s a hard one.RW: Breaks in play – setting up scrums, lineouts and so on – seem even more noticeable in games without fans. Would you like to see that change?EJ: 100%. The whole game needs to be sped up. If players are going down injured but aren’t interfering with play, then play on. I’d stop the clock for scrums and get rid of the huddle for lineouts. At one stage we got rid of the huddle and now we’ve allowed it to come back.The game is cyclical – you get rid of something, someone brings it back and then it comes back in.RW: What’s the greatest threat to Test rugby?EJ: At the moment, obviously travel. But generally I think the game and Test rugby is healthy. What I’d like to see is for rugby to create something like Twenty20 cricket, something in between Test rugby and serious domestic rugby.We need serious domestic competitions and we need Test rugby, but look at Twenty20 cricket… It’s brought a new crowd in, it’s brought new skills to players, it’s brought excitement. Can we bring that into rugby, another level of rugby? Because sevens hasn’t done it. The reason for that is the best players don’t play sevens.We need almost an abridged version of Test rugby that’s faster and quicker, like the IPL in cricket. Watching Test cricket, I’ve noticed how skilful players are, it’s (Twenty20) changed the way they play now. Playing something like the IPL for a few weeks a year in rugby would create new skills and players would be able to bring that to Test rugby.RW: What’s your vision for it? How many players etc?EJ: A 12 v 12 game. You’d still have scrums and lineouts and rucks, and there would be more space. The difference in space when there are 12 or 13 as opposed to 15 is massive. Space is getting tighter and tighter because locks now tackle like back-rowers and back-rowers tackle in the centres.When I coached Japan we did a whole pre-season 12 v 12 and I think that’s one of the reasons we did well – players were able to operate in space under immense pressure.RW: Have you done that with England?EJ: I don’t have the time to do it with England.RW: Premiership DoRs have been positive about improved communication with you recently. What’s changed?EJ: Normally that would be the RFU’s role and I’ve purposefully tried to keep out of it, but during this period of time I need to come into it. We’ve cut three camps from the next 12 months to help players’ load. It’s important to do that, to all share the burden.RW: How are the RFU cuts going to impact your team?EJ: I’m not sure at the moment, but whatever it is we’ll cope with it. Scott Wisemantel and I coached Japan for two years by ourselves so we can cope with anything. Whether it’s just me and two other assistants, whatever happens we’ll get on with it. Any sacrifices we make will be small compared to what is happening in the world.RW: Do you have any fears for the wider community game?EJ: Not at all. It’s cyclical. Every cycle you have the same. Whether it was Australia post-World Cup or here post-World Cup, what tends to happen after a World Cup is that you’ve started these projects and staff numbers go from 150 to 300, then the money from the World Cup isn’t there any more so you have to cut back to get back to where you were pre-World Cup and then you start again.RW: Is it a case of fine-tuning or a major overhaul for England to win the next World Cup?EJ: A bit of both. Whatever works we’ll keep and other areas we’ll improve. If you had five gears in a car, it’s about finding sixth gear. If games keep getting faster, and hopefully they will, we really need to make sure that if an opportunity comes we take it. Traditionally we’ve not been good at that, so we need to get organised and be better at that.RW: Who are the best young players in the Premiership?EJ: There’s a few. Ollie Thorley is coming through, Jacob Umaga, Fraser Dingwall, George Furbank, Jack Willis, Ben Curry, Charlie Ewels I’ve mentioned. What’s also noticeable is the number of players coming through from the Championship and doing well. It’s really showing how many good players went there and took their opportunity.Making strides: Jack Willis breaks in Wasps’ Premiership semi-final win over Bristol (Getty Images)RW: What about a young scrum-half? Or are you planning to rely on Ben Youngs until 2023?EJ: Hopefully he’ll keep going. Alex Mitchell is coming through and Dan Robson has played well.RW: How have you changed your lifestyle since suffering a stroke back in 2013?EJ: I try to eat better, drink less, sleep more, although that’s debatable. I generally try to take care of myself better.RW: Do you sleep under your desk?EJ: Not under it but sometimes I sleep on my desk! One of the habits I got in Japan is that I can sleep standing up on the train, so I can fall asleep anywhere.I generally spend 20-30 minutes during the day – it’s like a first half and a second half, so I feel revived for the second half in the afternoon.RW: What’s the best book you’ve read recently? EJ: Intangibles by Joan Ryan. It’s about team chemistry and features baseball. I rewatched Moneyball during lockdown, too; baseball is interesting with the recruitment aspect. The England head coach talks selection, statistics and sleeping at his desk Eddie Jones on his coaching methodsEddie Jones has a big smile on his face as he settles himself into a sun-dappled corner of Pennyhill Park, where he has an office even when the England squad are not in camp.He’s been busy over recent weeks, travelling around the country to watch Gallagher Premiership matches, but the return of international rugby in the northern hemisphere isn’t far away now. England face the Barbarians at Twickenham on 25 October before their final Six Nations fixture against Italy on Saturday 31 October and then they will compete in the Autumn Nations Cup in November.For now, though, Jones gives his thoughts on the current state of the game and provides an insight into his coaching methods…Rugby World: What do you get from seeing a game live that you can’t from watching on TV?Eddie Jones: As national coach, I’m going to games to watch players. I look to see how they react to situations, how they relate to other players, what they do off the ball.Most of the vision is about on the ball and I want to see what players are doing off the ball. Even if you look at the best players in the world, 90% of what they do is off the ball.Watching brief: Eddie Jones takes in a Premiership match with John Mitchell (Getty Images)RW: Is it interesting hearing the players communicate with no fans in stadiums at the moment?EJ: 100%. It’s really evident. In the Northampton-Wasps game, the difference in the level of communication between the two teams… A couple of players were quite boisterous.I always look back to the Champions League last year, Liverpool v Barcelona. In football you’re so close to the players you can see who is talking and who isn’t. Virgil van Dijk compared to everyone else was a real captain, leading and gesticulating.Barcelona were going one, two, three, four down. (Lionel) Messi leads by his brilliance, not by his energy or communication. When the team is doing it tough, that’s what you need.RW: So who was talking in the Northampton-Wasps game?EJ: Jimmy Gopperth. You see the value he adds to the team; it shows the importance of foreign players in the competition. You look at an experienced guy like him helping someone like Jacob Umaga – that’s an unbelievable role model for him.RW: How easy is it to change your mind on a subject? Can you be won round on a player, selection, tactics?EJ: You’ve got to have your own opinion, but there is value you can get from other people and you need to be open to hearing other views. The big difference in hearing the media view is they generally look at the big things about a player – one big run or one big tackle.RW: Who is the most improved England player since the World Cup in Japan last year?EJ: A couple of guys are going in the right direction. Anthony Watson and Jonathan Joseph – both of those guys have had reasonably celebrated careers up to now and I think the best is ahead of them. In the forwards, Tom Curry and Charlie Ewels have massive potential.RW: You’ve said you need to improve your selection. How and why are you doing that?EJ: I think you can always get better, that’s key, and in my job as national coach, selection is 90% of the job. We’ll have five days to prepare for the Italy game (in October) and that means two hours on the field. My ability to have an impact in coaching the team technically is marginal but in selection it’s enormous.I’m always looking at ways to improve. We don’t have a metric looking at off-the-ball data. Look at Mako Vunipola, probably the best loosehead in the world. He has ten carries a game, that’s 30 seconds. He makes 15 tackles, that’s another 45 seconds. So that’s 75 seconds out of 80 minutes.On the ball: England prop Mako Vunipola tries to find a gap in Scotland’s defence (Getty Images)That’s what’s recorded, but what about all the things he does outside of that period of time? How he affects the game, because you’d don’t have to be on the ball to affect the game. It’s measuring what players do off the ball to give us far greater objective information on players’ performance.We’re looking to investigate that. Baseball has shown the way with metrics and football is moving into that. Rugby is quite slow in that area, probably because of the cost.RW: So you back Moneyball principles?EJ: It’s Astroball actually. That’s a mixture of metrics and intuition, so you still get a feel for it. That’s a great book if you haven’t read it. And The Cubs Way is similar to Astroball – metrics and intuition. It’s about getting the balance right and we’re investigating ways of getting better at doing it.It’s like Jimmy Gopperth as I mentioned earlier. It’s being able to bring a player into a team, someone who maybe doesn’t look like the greatest player but it’s the value he adds to the team. Like Chris Robshaw did for us.RW: What has been your biggest learning in all your years as a coach?EJ: That I don’t know much. In all of history, as a young coach coming through you think you know everything, but the longer you coach the more you know you don’t know.Look at Manchester City v Lyon (Lyon won 3-1 in the Champions League) – no one thought Lyon would win in all seriousness but that’s the beauty of the game. The best coach in the world with the best players beaten by another side – how? That’s the game.It shows you don’t know everything and that maybe there’s a problem in the team. When you’re going well, you don’t mine deep enough. The more you learn as a coach, it is sometimes about digging deeper.RW: Is that why you’re still coaching because you’re still learning?EJ: It’s like a piece of string – you don’t know the end of it and the further you get the more you learn. That’s the great thing.RW: Do you think you’ll coach forever?EJ: No, everyone has a certain time. Speaking to Sir Alex Ferguson, I asked him, “Why did you give up?” He said he just knew.I usually get up around 5am but I might wake up one morning and not really want to get up at 5am, I want to sleep in, and then you start thinking about those decisions. I remember as a player playing my last games, I’d usually do the off-the-ball type of stuff, diving on the ball and so on, but when I didn’t want to do that I thought it was time to give up.RW: The Edge cricket documentary looks at England’s rise to number one under Andy Flower but also the mental pressures on players. How do you balance driving performance and players’ mental health?EJ: I’ve had to evolve. Rugby has changed immensely, players have changed, and you have to change if you want to stay in the game. The bang-on-the-table, lead-with-emotion style is valuable at times, but it’s more working together.My generation of people coming through, we were educated just to do it, if you’re not good enough find a way to do it, don’t look for excuses and so on. I remember one of the great mistakes I made was I wanted my daughter to be like me. She’s 27 now and tough as teak, she works as a logistics officer for the Wallabies, but growing up I wanted her to be like me and she wasn’t.That was a real learning for me as a coach too, the next generation doesn’t think like me. Every generation has it much easier than the last. The world is changing and you’ve got to change with it.RW: So have you mellowed? Do you get less angry now?EJ: I don’t remember once raising my voice with the England team. Because I don’t feel it would be effective. I remember one game when I realised the change. We were playing Samoa (in 2017) and were playing terribly; we were sloppy and it looked like we didn’t care.It was coming up to half-time and I was angry and I thought that would be the time I’d have gone at the team, but I thought about a different approach on the way down. I thought, ‘I need the players to solve this’.So before we all got together I told the players to work out what they needed to do, then we’d have a chat. They did that and went out in the second half and played really well. That showed the change in approach.RW: Is it important to you to empower players like that?EJ: They have their voice but there are also certain things that are non-negotiable while others are negotiable. One thing for me that isn’t negotiable is how hard we work.Why do players have a coach? Why does Roger Federer at 39, with two sets of twins, one of the wealthiest guys in the world, why does he have a coach telling him what to do? Because they’ll make you do what you don’t want to do.RW: Did you raise your voice with Japan?EJ: At times when it was appropriate. But if I went back to Japan now, having seen how it’s changed, I don’t think it would be appropriate. Generations keep changing all the time. When I first went to Japan in the Nineties there was no graffiti because people were socially cohesive. Now there’s graffiti because people want to be individual.RW: How do you know which approach to use with different players or different teams?EJ: I don’t think I’ve got any great skills. I think experience teaches you that. I’m always trying to find an emotional attachment with someone.I was lucky enough to chat to Louis van Gaal at the airport in Amsterdam about 18 months ago. He was two years out from Manchester United, which wasn’t a great experience for him, and he didn’t know who I was or what I did but through a contact we had lunch.center_img Strike a pose: Eddie Jones modelling the new England range from Umbro (Phil Mingo/PPAUK) This article originally appeared in the October 2020 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

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The Cubist House / Moussafir Architectes

first_img Houses “COPY” “COPY” Save this picture!© Herve Abbadie+ 20 Share The Cubist House / Moussafir Architectes The Cubist House / Moussafir ArchitectesSave this projectSaveThe Cubist House / Moussafir Architectes ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/786412/the-cubist-house-moussafir-architectes Clipboard Year:  Landscape Design: Architects:Jacques Moussafir, Virginie Prié, Alexis Duquennoy, Victoria Miny, Lieselotte Huygue, Moussafir ArchitectesPartner Engineers:Malishev Wilson Engineers, LBECity:ParisCountry:FranceMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Herve AbbadieText description provided by the architects. Designed for a Paris-based family with two children, the Cubist House is located in a courtyard that encloses an urban oasis, totally disconnected from the busy, greenless street outside. Save this picture!© Herve AbbadieJacques Moussafir’s context-based design enhances the positive qualities of the site and resolves its problematic aspects. Save this picture!PlanSave this picture!SectionThe project responds to its highly textured surroundings, in which various typologies, materials and historic elements coexist with lush vegetation. On a footprint of 108 m2, a cluster of three volumes with Corten cladding and large glazed openings forms a dynamic three-dimensional frontage whose different parts align with the adjacent facades on two sides.  Save this picture!© Jerome RicolleauThe ‘cubist’ combination of solids and voids offers an intelligent solution that brings ample natural light into an 8-meter deep interior of a house surrounded by seven and eight-storey-high buildings. At the same time, the fragmented facade relates to the history of the site defined by successive additions and transformations. ‘Here, more than anywhere else, we felt it necessary to opt for dense materials that would dialogue with the cobblestone paving, old masonry, and lime plaster, all of which tend to patinate and thus testify the passage of time,’ says Jacques Moussafir. Save this picture!© Herve AbbadieBoth the interior and the exterior of the Cubist House evoke a collage of volumes and materials that form spatial compositions oscillating between 2D and 3D. The concrete floor in the ground-level kitchen/dining/living room incorporates ‘islands’ of parquet flooring that correspond to the distinct suspended volumes of the upper-floor rooms.  Save this picture!© Herve AbbadieA gap left between the rear side of the house and the neighbour’s masonry wall has a double function: it contains a staircase and serves as a light well that lets natural light penetrate through the openings in the rear wall with integrated ‘architectural furniture’ items.Save this picture!© Herve AbbadieProject gallerySee allShow lessComic Break: “School vs. Work”ArticlesMVRDV and COBE’s Museum of Rock Opens in the Danish City of RoskildeArchitecture News Share Architects: Moussafir Architectes Area Area of this architecture project Projects France Manufacturers: Admonter, Bette, Bisazza, Boffi, Ceramica Globo, Fantini, Acor, Bonnardel, Brandoni, Codimat, Durcisseurs Français, Liquid Elements, Liquid elements, MZ Productions, VALVO ArchDaily Photographs CopyHouses•Paris, France Cao Perrot Studio CopyAbout this officeMoussafir ArchitectesOfficeFollowProductWood#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesParisFrancePublished on April 29, 2016Cite: “The Cubist House / Moussafir Architectes” 29 Apr 2016. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic BrassGlassMitrexSolar GreenhouseLouvers / ShuttersTechnowoodSunshade SystemsFaucetsDornbrachtKitchen Fittings – EnoWoodSculptformTimber Tongue and Groove CladdingMembranesEffisusFaçade Fire Weatherproofing Solutions in Design District Project LondonHanging LampsLouis PoulsenPendant Lights – KeglenBlinds / Mosquito Nets / CurtainsBANDALUXPleated ShadesEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesFranken-SchotterFacade System –  LINEAWoodBlumer LehmannCNC Production for Wood ProjectsMaterials / Construction SystemsCaneplex DesignPoles – Tonkin BambooFibre Cement / ConcreteTegralFibre Cement Slate Roofing – Thrutone Endurance SmoothMore products »Read commentsSave想阅读文章的中文版本吗?巴黎立体派住宅/ Moussafir Architectes是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Area:  250 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project 2015 ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/786412/the-cubist-house-moussafir-architectes Clipboard Photographs:  Herve Abbadie, Jerome Ricolleau Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project last_img read more

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Ecclesiastical announces three year partnership with the Children’s Society

first_img  17 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 18 October 2006 | News Tagged with: Giving/Philanthropy AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The specialist insurance company, Ecclesiastical, has named The Children’s Society as their nominated charity benefiting from a three-year partnership of sponsorship and employee commitment. This union will ensure The Children’s Society can continue its work with the most disadvantaged and vulnerable children and young people.Over the next three years, Ecclesiastical will be the main sponsor of The Children’s Society’s national charity walks ‘Footsteps for the Future’ to launch in 2007. Ecclesiastical staff throughout the country will also be given a ‘community day’ for volunteering and fundraising opportunities. The company has also agreed to contribute to a newly introduced staff payroll-giving scheme.more: www.childrenssociety.org.uk About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Ecclesiastical announces three year partnership with the Children’s Societylast_img read more

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Understanding Fundraising Its About ‘gifts’ Not ‘money’ (Quickguides)

first_img  8 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Understanding Fundraising Its About ‘gifts’ Not ‘money’ (Quickguides) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 27 October 2007 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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5 upcoming charity fundraising events

first_img5 upcoming charity fundraising events Secret World Wildlife Rescue Wildlife WondersSecret World Wildlife Rescue is holding its Wildlife Wonders event on the Bank Holiday weekend of 26 / 27 August. Activities will include a woodland-themed treasure hunt, meeting the centre’s birds of prey, talks about the animals it helps, and crafts and face painting. Forever Friends Appeal Newfoundland Dog DiveOn 22 September, Bath RUH’s Forever Friends Appeal is again offering people the chance to experience an ‘at sea’ Newfoundland dog rescue. The event will take place at Portishead Marina near Bristol, and is run by Newfound Friends on behalf of the Forever Friends Appeal. Last year, the inaugural event raised £5,000. — Leuka (@leadleukaemia) August 9, 2018Leuka Loves Afternoon TeaLeuka has launched its newest fundraising event, Leuka Loves Afternoon Tea, to coincide with Afternoon Tea Week. It is asking supporters to hold a tea one August afternoon from this Monday (13 August), and to register on its website to receive a ‘Leuka Loves Afternoon Tea’ kit. Leuka would also like people to share their activities on social media with the hashtag #LoveAfternoonTeaHateLeukaemia. To incentivise people to take part in this pilot event it will be thanking the supporter (or supporters) who raises the most in donations and the one with the most shares, likes or retweets from their Afternoon Tea event, with Champagne Afternoon Tea for two at the Wolseley in Piccadilly, London. There are a plethora of fundraising events coming up over the next couple of months. Here are five different ways charities are raising funds. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis10 Tagged with: fundraising events Fundraising ideas NHS70 Virtual RunEntries are now open for the official NHS70 Virtual Run. The ‘7 for 70’ event has been launched by Go Virtual Racing in partnership with NHS Charities Together with runners of all ages and abilities asked to sign up to run or walk 7.0 kilometres or 7.0 miles to raise funds for charity for which they will be awarded with a double-sided medal. All funds raised will be shared between all the hospitals involved in the NHS70 celebrations and distributed across the whole of the UK.center_img Fancy getting a little bit fancy and holding an Afternoon Tea to raise funds for leukaemia research? Then come this way… https://t.co/D3L7zqZG6Z pic.twitter.com/KmWTgm86dv Advertisement Birmingham St Mary’s Hospice Loop the LoopOn 18 August, Birmingham St Mary’s Hospice is challenging people to take to the air and loop the loop to raise funds. It has teamed up with Take Flight Aviation to offer the challenge, which gives people the chance to take off in the Slingsby Firefly and have a go at flying the plane themselves, and then have the pilot take over so they can fully experience the loop and the view. Main image: Members of #TeamLGT from Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust   279 total views,  3 views today  280 total views,  4 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis10 Melanie May | 13 August 2018 | News About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

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U.S. State Department tells Haiti: No money, no elections

first_imgDr. Maryse Narcisse, Fanmi Lavalas’s candidate for president.The Haitian parliament was essentially dissolved months ago when terms for all its members, except 10 senators, ran out. President Michel Martelly, who can’t run again, has been ruling by decree. Martelly’s prime minister, Evan Paul, holds office only on a de facto basis, since the Parliament has been dissolved and thus can’t approve his appointment.Back in March, the Provisional Electoral Council (CEP) set the schedule: Two-thirds of the Senate and the entire lower chamber of deputies will be elected Aug. 9; the presidential election will be held on Oct. 25, with a run-off, if necessary, on Dec. 27; local and municipal elections will be held on the October date.Some Haitian political organizations like the progressive Dessalines Coordination and its allies oppose holding elections while the U.N.’s Minustah are enforcing a military occupation of the country and U.S.-imposed Martelly is president.But many other groups have decided to participate.The CEP announced May 15 that 1,515 candidates from 98 parties will be running in the parliamentary elections.Support for Fanmi LavalasMay 19 saw a major outburst of popular support for Fanmi Lavalas, the political party founded by former President Jean Bertrand Aristide. Thousands of excited and militant supporters went from Aristide’s house in Tabarre to accompany Dr. Maryse Narcisse, Fanmi Lavalas’s candidate for president, to the election offices.Earlier, Narcisse made two trips to Boston to solicit support in its Haitian community, meeting with community activists and Haitian trade unionists.The CEP reported May 23 that 70 people had registered as candidates for president and that challenges to their qualifications had been raised against 23 of them, including Narcisse.Two days after the Fanmi Lavalas rally, U.S. State Department Haiti Special Adviser Thomas C. Adams told a group of Haitian journalists in Washington that the State Department judged now was an “opportune” time for Haiti to change its electoral schedule. It doesn’t have the money to carry it out. (Haiti Sentinel, May 22)For the past 10 years, the tactic that the United States and the Haitian bourgeoisie have used to keep Fanmi Lavalas from winning elections is to keep them off the ballot. But now the U.S. has lost control of the electoral process. Many fairly well-known progressive candidates are on the ballot, like Moïse Jean-Charles of Platfòm Pitit Dessalines. These candidates tend to get the votes of Haitians who vote their choice rather than vote for the lesser of two evils.Washington remembers what happened in 1990. By a landslide, Jean Bertrand Aristide beat the U.S.-backed candidate, who outspent him 60 to 1. That U.S. defeat threatened Washington’s control of Haiti, which required two decades of intervention to restore.To avoid a similar setback in the upcoming elections, Washington is now raising the possibility of cancelling the elections altogether.It’s hard to lose an election that isn’t held.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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