Investigating possible causes of the observed diurnal variability in Antarctic NOy

first_imgThe occurence of a diurnal variability in measured total oxidised nitrogen (NOy) was observed at Neumayer, Antarctica, (70 degrees 39’8, 8 degrees 15’W) during a recent summer measurement campaign. Minima and maxims occurred in the early morning/early evening respectively, with the amplitude of the cycle around 40% of the daily mean NOy values. Given that this campaign was the first to attempt NOy measurements on the Antarctic continent, it is not presently clear whether this is an Antarctic-wide phenomenon, or local to Neumayer. A similar cycle was observed for HNO3, although HNO3 concentrations and fluctuations are too small to account for all of the NOy variability. In this paper we investigate possible mechanisms that might cause such diurnal signals, focussing on the influence of local meteorology and also of the snowpack. Exchange processes at the air/snow interface appear to dominate the observed NOy variability, although an influence from the changing surface inversion strength exists. These findings have important implications in understanding and hence correctly interpreting ice core nitrate data.last_img read more

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Woodside completes Sangomar acquisition from Cairn

first_img Woodside completes Sangomar acquisition from Cairn. (Credit: Capri23auto from Pixabay.) Woodside Energy (Senegal) B.V. has completed the acquisition of Capricorn Senegal Limited’s (Cairn) entire participating interest in the Rufisque Offshore, Sangomar Offshore and Sangomar Deep Offshore (RSSD) joint venture.The purchase price was US$300 million plus a working capital adjustment of approximately US$225 million, which included a reimbursement of Cairn’s development capital expenditure incurred since 1 January 2020. Additional payments of up to US$100 million are contingent on commodity prices and timing of first oil.Woodside CEO Peter Coleman said the acquisition of Cairn’s interest in the Sangomar project area offshore Senegal was value accretive for shareholders.“The development of Sangomar is being executed according to schedule. The Senegal team recently achieved another milestone, with the award of the contract for the operations and maintenance of the floating production storage and offloading vessel which is targeted for delivery and first oil production in 2023.“The completion of the transaction with Cairn has simplified the structure of the joint venture ahead of our planned equity sell-down in 2021. The Sangomar development is an attractive, de-risked asset that offers near-term production to potential buyers,” he said.Woodside’s participating interest in the RSSD joint venture has increased to approximately 68.33% for the Sangomar exploitation area and to 75% for the remaining RSSD evaluation area. Woodside’s interest will further increase to 82% for the Sangomar exploitation area and to 90% for the remaining RSSD evaluation area subject to completion of the FAR acquisition announced on 3 December 2020. Woodside will remain operator. Source: Company Press Release Woodside’s participating interest in the RSSD joint venture has increased to approximately 68.33% for the Sangomar exploitation arealast_img read more

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Flatfair appoints Google strategist as Head of Marketing

first_imgHome » News » Flatfair appoints Google strategist as Head of Marketing previous nextProptechFlatfair appoints Google strategist as Head of MarketingThe Negotiator22nd April 20200139 Views Flatfair, an alternative deposit scheme and rental platform, has appointed a former William Hill and Google strategist as its Head of Marketing.Elisabeth Yates joins the proptech firm after spending two and a half years as senior strategy manager for online gaming at William Hill and a short stint as a marketing campaigns manager for Google prior to that. She also spent four years working in strategy for voucher site Groupon.Elisabeth said, “Flatfair’s payment technology is revolutionising the way we think about renting.“The industry is moving in the right direction, but this is a vital time for tenants, landlords and agents alike to embrace the technology that has brought so much to other aspects of our lives, and I am looking forward to collectively driving this change at flatfair.”Her appointment comes after flatfair, which offers a deposit alternative for a one-off fee and uses Open Banking for speedy referencing, continues to grow the business after attracting $11 million through a Series A fundraising last year.Elisabeth Yates Open Banking for speedy referencing proptech flatfair April 22, 2020Jenny van BredaWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more

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£500,000 revamp for beleaguered Park End

first_imgOxford club Park End is to reopen later this month after half a million pounds of refurbishment in an attempt to reverse declining attendances.Park End, which traditionally hosts OUSU’s ‘Zoo’ nights for Oxford students on Wednesdays, has been experiencing low turnout since Trinity Term. The club will be renamed ‘Lava Ignite’ when it reopens on November 30.The relaunch comes after forced midnight closures on several recent occasions due to low numbers.OUSU, however, have denied concerns that Park End has been experiencing difficulties and confirmed its support for the club.Dave Green, OUSU Business Manager responsible for Zoo nights, said, “We are sticking by Park End, we are 100 per cent committed to it.”Park End will be joining a chain of nine Lava Ignite clubs around the UK after a change in management, the owners claiming it will feature VIP booths, new decor and flooring, and plasma screens. Balreick Srai, founder of rival promotions and events company Rock Student, criticised Park End and OUSU’s Zoo nights.”Park End hasn’t been doing well recently and has been facing more competition than it did five years ago,” he said. “It has become much more difficult for large clubs to compete as smaller venues, and house parties are advertised more efficiently than in the past on Facebook.”A refurbishment is just cosmetic. What will really matter is their promoters and whether they understand what their clients want. After Park End’s performance last and this term, it seems to be on the decline. Wednesdays has been the main student night at Park End since 1995/1996, but last summer was bad. They had a management change but the Zoo guys are pretty incompetent, and they’re using their monopolistic power to control what is promoted to the students.” Robbie Parks, Keble College’s Entz Rep, suggested that Srai’s company was taking over Park End’s business. “People lost interest during Trinity Term and the current generation won’t miss it. Zoo’s popularity is dwindling; it’s all about Rock Oxford now. I don’t think many people will miss it. The queues are heaving for the OFS,” he said.last_img read more

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O.C. Boy Scouts Sponsor “Super Chili Bowl”

first_imgOcean City’s Boy Scout Troop 32 is getting ready for its Super Chili Bowl fundraiser. By Doug OttoOcean City Boy Scouts from Troop 32 will be holding the third annual Super Chili Bowl fundraiser on Saturday, Feb. 2, from 4-6 p.m. at the Howard S. Stainton Senior Center, located at 1735 Simpson Ave.Super Chili Bowls I and II brought out many fine chefs and taste-testers who voted for their favorite chili styles and raised funds for Troop 32.Prizes will go to the top chefs receiving votes from the general public after sampling the many different chili styles. The event is free for chef/participants, with $5 per person charged at the door for taste-testing guests. Prizes will be given for Best Chili, Most Unique Chili, Hottest Chili and Best Cornbread. “We’re looking to get chili cooking chefs to enter our friendly fray,” said Scoutmaster Dean William Mitzel. “We’ve had two successful contests so far, and we want this year to be even bigger.”Chili chefs can register by sending their name, email address and phone number to Crystal Erney at 609-335-3598 or [email protected] City Scout Troop 32, established in 1964, is a values-based youth development organization, helping to build future leaders by combining educational activities with fun. For more information about this event or about joining Troop 32, contact Scoutmaster Dean William Mitzel at (609) 938-0725.last_img read more

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Health drives soft drinks sector

first_imgHealthy option soft drinks look to be the key driver in terms of the UK soft drinks market, according to a new report published by Zenith International.”Health, wellbeing, functionality and convenience have been the key factors shaping the UK soft drinks market,” said Zenith market intelligence director Gary Roethenbaugh. “Premium health and wellness drinks led the way. Chilled juice, smoothies, still juice drinks, energy and sports drinks witnessed the highest growth last year.”Carbonates continue to claim the largest market share, accounting for 42% of consumption in 2007. Ready-to-drink dilutables had a 24% share, followed by bottled water with 15%, fruit juice/nectars with 11% and still drinks with the remaining 8%. Sales of smoothies have benefited from consumers’ interest in health and wellness products, seeing a 44% rise in volume sales. Research by the drinks consultancy also revealed that despite the wet summer of 2007, soft drinks sales took less than a 1% dip, achieving a retail value of £12.9bn.Despite price pressures, Zenith expects that total soft drinks consumption will exceed 15,000 million tonnes – the equivalent of 249 litres per person – by 2012.[http://www.zenithinternational.com]last_img read more

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News story: Schools challenged to go single-use plastic free by 2022

first_img On my first school visit as Education Secretary almost a year ago, the very first question I was asked by a pupil was what we can do to limit the damage of plastic on the environment. Reducing our use of plastic clearly is an important and timely issue which as captured the interest and the imagination of everyone in society. Plastic can harm our precious environment and be lethal to wildlife. The leadership shown by schools like Georgeham Primary in going single use plastic free is an impressive example for us all – and I want work to support every school in the country following their lead by 2022. It’s not always easy but we all have a role to play in driving out avoidable plastic waste, and with more schools joining others and leading by example, we can help to leave our planet in a better state than we found it. Georgeham Primary was awarded the accolade by Surfers against Sewage, a marine conservation charity, who recognised that the school had met 5 crucial targets including an initial plastic audit of the school and removing at least 3 items of single-use plastic items throughout the school. The key changes that enabled the school to go plastic free was by getting rid of plastic from the school’s supply chain and replacing single use plastic with plastic that can be easily recycled.One of the most common uses of single use plastic are the straws and packaging from the cartons of milk provided to reception pupils in schools. After agreeing a deal with their suppliers, Georgeham School now have their milk delivered in recyclable containers and the children drink out of washable beakers.Whilst the government has a 25 year Environment Plan looking at the reduction of plastic use in general, the Education Secretary has asked the Department for Education to increase communication with the school supply chain regarding the plastic packaging of milk cartons and other day to day supplies for schools. Mr Hinds has the long-term ambition that all schools will work with suppliers to make these small changes with a view to make a big difference in single use plastic consumption.Julian Thomas, Headteacher at Georgeham Primary School said; The Education Secretary has today (27 December 2018) urged all schools to eliminate their use of single use plastics by 2022.Damian Hinds has called on senior leaders in schools to stop using items such as plastic bags, straws, bottles and food packaging in favour of sustainable alternatives, and invited them to start a conversation with pupils about the effects discarded plastics have on the environment and wildlife.The UK is committed to being a global leader in tackling the issue of plastic pollution and Mr Hinds is urging schools across the country to follow the lead of Georgeham Primary School in Devon who are the first school in the UK to achieve single use plastic free status.Education Secretary Damian Hinds said: We are thrilled to hear the Education Secretary is calling on all schools to become single use plastic free by 2022. All of our pupils enthusiastically played their part in helping the school reduce excessive single use plastic consumption. I am confident children across the rest of the country would also welcome the challenge! By making relatively minor changes, such as replacing cling film for foil in the canteen we were able to significantly reduce our plastic use in the school. We’re a small school but we think big and I’m very proud of everyone at Georgeham for what we’ve achieved. The government’s 25 year Environment Plan launched in January pledges the elimination of avoidable plastic waste by 2042 and promises to consider steps to discourage plastic items that prove difficult to recycle and ideas to reduce demand for commonly littered items, including takeaway coffee cups and takeaway boxes.There are also plans to introduce a world-leading new tax on plastic packaging which doesn’t meet a minimum threshold of at least 30% recycled content from April 2022, subject to consultation, to courage greater use of recycled plastic to tackle the problem of plastic waste and protect our environment.A YouGov survey commissioned by BRITA UK and Keep Britain Tidy in April found that young people are more committed than other generations to mitigating the effects of single-use plastic, with 68% of 18 to 24 year olds currently owning a reusable water bottle, above the national average of 55%.Read the single-use plastics brief for more information.last_img read more

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McVitie’s rolls out fully coated Digestives and Hobnobs

first_imgSource: PladisPladis is looking to tap into demand for premium treats with the launch of fully coated Digestives and Hobnobs.Dubbed ‘The Fully Coated One’, the NPD sees the McVitie’s core lines enrobed in milk chocolate. They’ll be available from January across supermarkets, convenience retailers and wholesale with an rsp of £1.79.The move elevates the biscuits from everyday treats to special ones, said Pladis. It added that the NPD would help retailers unlock incremental sales and encourage shoppers to trade up, thereby adding value to the category.“With the launch of our new, premium collection, we’re building on the momentum we’ve generated for the two brands – which were up by 35% between March and September this year – and delivering an extra special version of the biscuits consumers already love,” said Emma Stowers, brand director for McVitie’s at Pladis UK&I.“We’re confident the McVitie’s ‘Fully Coated’ range will be well-received in the market, particularly because this time, we’re making two of our best-loved biscuits the focus. Given current circumstances, we also expect more consumers to prioritise affordable, at-home treats as we move into 2021.”McVitie’s has rolled out several new variants of Digestives and Hobnobs throughout the year, including the limited-edition dessert-inspired British icons range, which included strawberry cheesecake and sticky toffee pudding variants, as well as VIBs. The latter was highlighted by British Baker as one of the top bakery launches of 2020.last_img read more

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Drawing attention

first_imgIn 2005, a Danish newspaper published a dozen editorial cartoons that would ignite an international controversy involving free speech and discrimination.Many of the images depicted the Islamic prophet Muhammad. In the most memorable and inflammatory of the drawings, the religious messenger was seen with a bomb tucked in his black turban. The cartoons appeared with an editorial about the importance of tolerance by the Muslim community and the paper’s growing concern over self-censorship. The images ran under the headline “The face of Muhammad.”Muhammad’s image has appeared in print for centuries, but many Muslims believe that depicting the prophet is blasphemous. Ensuing anger over the caricatures resulted in riots in several countries, and more than 200 people died.It was largely political posturing that sparked the furor over the depictions of the Islamic prophet rather than universal indignation, said Jytte Klausen, a Brandeis professor of politics who recently wrote “The Cartoons that Shook the World.”Klausen, who is also a research associate at Harvard’s Center for Middle Eastern Studies, addressed a crowd Tuesday (Dec. 1) at the Barker Center about the upheaval, which she researched in detail for her new book, interviewing almost all of the key players. The center’s Islam in the West program sponsored the discussion.“It very quickly became clear to me that I was in a unique position to write about this topic,” said Klausen, in part because of her Danish roots and familiarity with the newspaper that was always in her home during her childhood. “The sentiments that used to inform the paper were well-known to me,” she said, adding that in recent years the newspaper had adopted a much more libertarian leaning, in keeping with a trend in Europe toward a more populist form of conservatism, one focused on immigration as a key issue, with Islam and Muslims often viewed as a challenge to national identities.Klausen had strong contacts in the Muslim community, having recently finished a book on politics and religion in western Europe, based on interviews with Muslim leaders there.The Muslim outrage, argued the author, had two main sources, including the Egyptian government’s decision to make a “diplomatic issue” of the cartoons and complain to both the Danish government and the United Nations. With Egyptian elections pending, she said, officials in Cairo used the cartoons to “push back against the American agenda for democratization as a forward security strategy in the Middle East.”For Egypt, said Klausen, the controversy represented an opportunity “to put on the record that the West abuses human rights as well.”The other source of unrest, she said, was a group of imams and a coalition of religious activists in Denmark who were increasingly frustrated with what they felt was an unacceptable level of Muslim stereotyping.“The cartoons were the last drop in a glass that was already pretty filled with bitterness,” she said.But the violence and deaths occurred in faraway countries such as Nigeria, where preexisting tensions or “pre-existing theaters of war” were already in place, said Klausen, adding that the cartoons were not the real culprit.The legacy of the cartoon controversy was a “sad and mixed one,” said Klausen. “Everybody was looking at the same 12 drawings … but people had very different interpretations of what they saw.”Heightened censorship, both within the Arab world and the West, was one of the lasting repercussions from the crisis, she said, with her own work a partial casualty. After consulting with some authorities on Islam, officials at Yale University Press chose not to reprint the cartoons and removed all illustrations of Muhammad from her book.In a final twist of irony, a technical oversight stranded the author without a projector to show the crowd her slides, which included the offending cartoons. She was left simply to describe the images to the audience.Ultimately, Klausen said, her desire to instruct and educate outweighed her frustration and anger with Yale’s decision to remove the images, and she chose to publish the book anyway. Still, her anger over the censorship was evident in her voice.“My argument is that in order to understand why Muslims were upset by these cartoons, we need to look at them and discuss them and understand. That cannot be done now,” she said. “I didn’t think it’s the sort of thing that would happen in the United States.”last_img read more

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Onion Crop Loss.

first_imgMost of the onions, however, were ruined by heat damage. High temperatures in late March and early April caused soft spots in the onion bulbs, almost as if they had been cooked.This not only keeps the onions from being sold on the fresh market but makes them more susceptible to rot, which prevents them from being preserved.Torrance said the last straw came with heavy, mid-April rains. The excess moisture got trapped in the husks of the plants, causing a flare-up of stemphyllum fungus, which the farmers had been fighting all season.Some problems caused by the season’s climatic fluctuations were evident before harvest, so farmers expected lower yields. No one knew how bad things were until a few days after they started clipping the onions.”We still thought we had a salvageable crop when we started harvesting,” Torrance said. “We were pulling onions out of the ground that we thought were OK. Twenty-four to 48 hours later, we were finding out they were ruined.”Shad Dasher, a third-generation onion farmer near Ludowici, Ga., lost 95 percent of his onion crop. Before the harvest began, he had most of the crop presold.”Two to three days after clipping, the onions just weren’t holding up,” Dasher said. “On the third day of harvesting, we started dumping bags of onions in the fields to see how bad the damage was. My contractors came in and told me there was a problem. When they came to get me, that’s when I knew it was bad.” This year’s Vidalia onion crop is enough to bring tears to the eyes of southeast Georgia growers. Only 40 percent of the area’s biggest cash crop made it to market.Reid Torrance, a University of Georgia Extension Service agent in Tatnall County, said not every farmer was devastated by the poor season. But enough were hurt badly enough to necessitate federal and state aid for his county and the entire onion growing region.”Onions are a big commodity for Tatnall County, and in other counties around here, too,” Torrance said. “We had some people who had 85 percent of their crop come in. Then we had folks who lost 100 percent of their crop.”It’s the average that counts, Torrance said.”Our county lost 60 percent of its onion crop this year,” he said. “That means we’re getting less than half of our usual revenue.”Problems for the onions started with a late wave of warm weather in November. They were exacerbated by a roller coaster of climatic changes during the growing season.Onion plants are biennials that reproduce in their second season. So the late warm weather made them act as though they were in their second season, sending up seed stalks.That’s a death knell for onions. With seed stalks creating a tough core at the middle of the onion, the bulbs also don’t mature past the point when they send up their stalks, leaving them more susceptible to disease and heat damage.Add a heavy late frost on Feb. 28, and you have a recipe for onion disaster.The February frost left the onions’ leaves damaged. An unusually thick husk around the top of the plants then trapped moisture and bacteria inside, resulting in onions rotting from the inside out. Roller coaster climate killed this year’s onion crop revenues.center_img Photo: Dan Rahn last_img read more

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