Turkuaz Announces Extensive Fall Tour With Con Brio, The Suffers, And More

first_imgFunk powerhouse Turkuaz will embark on a massive tour this coming fall, with nearly 50 stops spanning coast-to-coast beginning in mid-September. In addition to previously announced dates with Sinkane throughout the West Coast, the band will be joined by Con Brio and The Suffers on select stops across the country, with Pimps of Joytime joining later for a pre-New Year’s Eve run in Boston and New Haven. The band will make a noteworthy stop at the newly opened Brooklyn Steel for a hometown throwdown in November, while continuing to dominate the festival circuit at events like Whale Rock Music Festival, Joshua Tree Music Festival, LEAF Festival, and Hangtown Music Festival.With the band’s recent nonstop trajectory, sitting in with Umphrey’s McGee and Mike Gordon this past weekend at Peach Festival and constantly ruling the national touring circuit, it would be a huge mistake to miss Turkuaz on tour. Visually, they’re a sight to behold, from synchronized dance moves down to a coordinated color scheme, but musically, they’re one of the tightest funk acts in the game right now.Live for Live Music is thrilled to be teaming up with the dynamic nine-piece to provide behind-the-scenes coverage, real-time recaps, and more updates from the road throughout the cross-country tour.Special, fan pre-sale tickets are available now at www.turkuazband.com ahead of general public on sale this Friday, Aug 18 @ 12pm local time.last_img read more

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Weather doesn’t affect ice cream consumption

first_imgEven with the changeable New England temperatures going up and down like a seesaw, few can forget the recent climb to a smoldering 102 degrees Fahrenheit. Frozen treats were one form of relief from the omnipresent heat, and the Harvard community sought them out wherever they could be found.In the summer, Annenberg Hall is the only place on campus where students can indulge in soft-serve frozen yogurt from 5:15 to 7:15 p.m. (During the academic year, all the dining halls serve it up.)“Students really love it,” says Martin Breslin, director for Culinary Operations at Harvard University Dining Services (HUDS), noting that vanilla is the most popular flavor, although the selection can range from graham cracker pie to cookies and cream to red velvet cake. Frozen yogurt makes way for the real thing on Sundays, when an ice cream sundae bar serves up Richardson’s ice cream with a full complement of toppings. And for those with delicate constitutions, frozen lactose-, dairy-, or soy-free alternatives are available upon request.But since none of the campus retail locations sell ice cream, many Harvard folk venture into the Square to satisfy their cravings. J.P. Licks, Pinkberry, BerryLine, and Yogurtland are all just steps away, as are Ben & Jerry’s and Lizzy’s.  And while a lot of ice cream and frozen yogurt is consumed on the hot, sunny days of summer, according to Breslin, consumption on campus is high year-round, with an increase during exam time.Bob Florio has worked at J.P. Licks for six years, and said it’s busiest in May, at the end of July, and August. Oreo cake batter is the store’s most popular flavor, and fudge the most popular topping. “We have the best fudge topping,” Florio said. He added that it’s busy all year, and people still order ice cream when it’s 10 degrees below zero outside.As July — National Ice Cream Month — winds down, the National Weather Service shows Cambridge’s temperatures going back up, so chances are you’ll find someone from the Harvard community dipping into a frozen delight.  For Harvard University Information Technology’s Jaime Bermudez it will be frozen yogurt, because it’s “healthier than ice cream,” he said as he topped off a cup with Cap’n Crunch at Yogurtland.Taylor Reiter ’15, who visits Yogurtland (or BerryLine, and sometimes Pinkberry) two to three times a week, said she loves a plain flavor with chocolate chips, or cookies and cream.Ali Almossawi, a former research associate at Harvard Business School who was back in town for a conference, had already been to J.P. Licks twice during his stay. “I miss it,” he said over a cup of chocolate brownie ice cream, confessing that he’d probably be back a few more times before he returns to San Francisco on Monday.last_img read more

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A playful turn for libraries

first_img Related A digital portrait of Colonial life Wealth of detail in wide-ranging archival project William Brewster was 14 when he started chronicling the habitat of birds and wildlife in Cambridge. He went on to document the changing natural landscape of his hometown for more than 50 years from the late 1800s into the 1900s.Brewster’s work, part of the collection at Harvard’s Ernst Mayr Library of the Museum of Comparative Zoology, represents an important resource in the study of the region’s natural history. One big problem, however, comes with transcribing the volumes of handwritten observations into digital text files that can be accessed and mined online.A new initiative is underway to use gaming and crowdsourcing to speed the massive task of transcribing such documents, at Harvard and around the world.The project, funded by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, enlists video gamers to help correct digital transcripts not easily converted into clean text files. Purposeful Gaming is a collaborative effort among the Missouri Botanical Garden, the Ernst Mayr Library, the New York Botanical Garden at Cornell University, and other members of an archives consortium called the Biodiversity Heritage Library. “What we hope is that people with an interest in games — but who want to do something useful as well — will find these games to be the perfect answer,” said Ernst Mayr librarian Constance Rinaldo. “People who love beautiful books and are fascinated by early scientific exploration, natural history, and games have an opportunity to help improve discovery of concepts in handwritten notes and other documents that are difficult to automatically transcribe.”The process under study is an alternative to optical character recognition (OCR), which converts images of text into encoded text files. OCR works well with uniform printed text, but less so with handwritten documents and certain typefaces.Ernst Mayr was chosen to be a partner in the grant because it was one of the first libraries in the consortium to digitize field notes and diaries. About a dozen volumes of Brewster’s diaries were used to test the effectiveness of the games.“Running these handwritten notes through optical character recognition is almost useless because it does not pick up the characters, and so it cannot be converted into text files reliably,” said Joseph deVeer, head of technical services in the Museum of Comparative Zoology. “In a nutshell, the Purposeful Gaming project was designed to feed multiple transcriptions through the game where players try to reconcile and determine which version is more accurate.”,Dartmouth College’s Tiltfactor, a digital design studio and research laboratory, created two video games for the project.The first, Smorball, resembles video football. Players can earn points by typing in words or phrases that pop up on the screen before they are tackled by the opposition. Beanstalk is a slower-paced game in which correct answers make the beanstalk grow.Through each game, players are helping to interpret and transcribe the scanned pages of Brewster’s work. For each word or phrase, a minimum of four players must provide an interpretation before the game software begins looking for matches and consensus in the answers.“The way it settles on one interpretation is when there have been at least four entries and one interpretation accounts for at least 75 percent of those entries, so it is based on consensus from the players about any word,” said Patrick Randall, the outreach coordinator at Harvard for Purposeful Gaming and the Biodiversity Heritage Library. “When enough people have picked an interpretation, the game will tag that word as complete. Once all the words for a single page of text have been tagged as complete, that text will be removed from the game.”The games have a diverse group of followers, from people connected to the Biodiversity Heritage Library community to those interested in citizen science to gamers just looking for a new challenge.In the fall, Tiltfactor brought Smorball and Beanstalk to the Boston Festival of Indie Games. In one day, a stream of players corrected more than 10,000 words on two laptops. Smorball was named the best serious game at the festival.Mary Flanagan, founder and director of Tiltfactor Laboratory and the Sherman Fairchild Distinguished Professor in Digital Humanities at Dartmouth College, said that the success of the games, in accuracy and popularity, should be an eye-opener.“There’s a great future to engaging the public with games that support cultural heritage,” said Flanagan. “That said, I think that this type of engagement and outreach has to be an integral mission for institutions, and they need to market such engagement opportunities just as they would an exhibition or special collection. I believe that these early projects provide proof of concept and promise in order for institutions to take that leap.”Library staffers at Harvard also see the potential for using gaming and crowdsourcing to widen access to old, handwritten documents and other challenging materials.For example, William Brewster’s records contain a wealth of data about climate, bird diversity, and habitat changes. The Ernst Mayr Library holds 45 years of Brewster’s journals, field notes, and manuscripts, and just one volume may number 450 pages. A trained transcriber would spend nearly 15 minutes typing each page into a text file.“With the project, 12 Brewster volumes were completed in less than a year,” said Randall. “Had those tools not been available and we just had library staff working on it — for one thing, we would not have been able to do that — but even if we did, it would take several years.”last_img read more

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Q&A: Carleen Porter-Internship in Italy

first_imgHow did you decide on this program?Last spring, I was going to be part of a UGA-sponsored program in Verona for three months. I contacted Amanda Stephens (CAES Associate Director of Student Engagement) about adding on the certificate internship. Amanda was able to work with the UGA veterinary school to secure a veterinary internship at the University of Perugia.What was it like settling in after your arrival?After a grand tour of the vet school by the director, I attempted to blend in with the vet students. During the first couple of weeks, I walked around to the different sections of the hospital. I quickly figured out that most of the action happened in the equine department. Since I already had experience in small animal surgery, I was excited to gain experience in large animal and joined the equine department!What activities did you engage in while in the equine department?The director of equine surgery realized that I was “the American,” so he gave me their uniform green scrubs and he and the other doctors basically took me under their wing. I was able to scrub in for surgeries every day, and I learned that there is a huge difference in small and large animal surgical procedures. Putting horses down for surgery is a much more stressful process than putting a dog or cat down, for instance. Surgeries are my favorite, so I loved being able to compare these surgeries to small animal surgeries I had seen before.Was there any particular case that sticks with you?One of my favorite cases was an ataxic foal that came to stay for a couple weeks. He was having seizures 24/7, so someone had to hold him and keep him from hurting himself at all times. He was on oxygen and had to be lifted up every thirty minutes. When the vet students needed a break, they let me take their job of sitting on the stall floor and gently holding him still. Once he became a bit healthier, he started nursing from his mother. The problem was that his mother didn’t “accept” him due to his health issues, so she would constantly try to kick and bite him while he was nursing. After I had proved my skill of holding him, they let me take him to his mother and help him nurse from her, whilst simultaneously trying to avoid kicks from her! It was a fascinating case, and he was pretty cute, too.How about life in Perugia? Were you able to get to meet a lot of new people?My favorite part of Perugia was how easily I could walk to town. I couldn’t help thinking that maybe if America was as pedestrian friendly as Europe, we would have a much more active society. My fitbit never had less than 20,000 steps every single day! I also made friends from different countries including Spain, Portugal and Russia. I met a Spanish girl my first week in Perugia who insisted that I “take an aperitivo” with her and a friend. Aperitivo is when you buy a drink and then get a buffet of appetizer foods; it became my new favorite tradition. It was great making these new friends because I was able to experience Italian culture from American and Spanish perspectives at the same time. I also enjoyed having dinner in Perugia because it involved sitting around and talking and sharing our day while we ate.How did this internship abroad affect your view of the world?The constant interactions with people from other countries helped me become more open to discussing uncomfortable subjects and different opinions. My Perugia friends were some of the friendliest people I have ever known, I only hope that I can return the favor and be so inviting to those visiting UGA, Georgia, and the states.Do you have any words for students considering the International Agriculture Certificate Program?Take the leap of faith. There are people willing to help you find the right program and a great number of scholarship opportunities. Before my trip I was focused on getting into vet schools in Georgia, but this experience has opened my mind to possibly looking at applying to veterinary schools outside of Georgia and even in Europe. I’m so grateful to have been able to have this experience of a lifetime!last_img read more

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Coal companies stalling on new lease applications

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Casper Star-Tribune:Coal companies used to grumble about how long it takes to get coal leased from the federal government. That’s no longer the case.Applications to lease nearly 1 billion tons of coal are pending in Wyoming, not because the federal agency tasked with performing environmental analysis is moving slow, but because coal companies are.Three lingering lease applications for Powder River Basin Coal are on the books: West Antelope 3, North Highlight and Maysdorf II South. In May, Cloud Peak Energy asked the Bureau of Land Management for a pause on one of those — an expansion at the Antelope Coal mine.The company said it needs more time to do baseline testing and consult with tribes, according to a letter obtained through a public records request by the Powder River Basin Resource Council, a Sheridan-based landowners’ group. Cloud Peak noted in its May letter that it supports the intent of the 2017 order from Interior, but that the company would need more time to work on the West Antelope 3. The lease is for 441 million tons of in-place coal near the Campbell and Converse County border.Cloud Peak also proposed Maysdorf II, a 233,550,000-ton application to lease adjacent to the Cordero Rojo mine south of Gillette. The company is currently “reconfiguring” that lease tract, according to the BLM.A third lease application proposed by Arch Coal in 2005 is pending. The 468 million ton North Highlight lease was one of a handful of coal lease applications analyzed by the BLM in the Wright area. A court case forced the agency to reevaluate the impact that leasing the coal would have on increasing greenhouse gases. A reassessment of that impact is currently out for public comment. It is unclear if Arch Coal will pursue those tons of coal going forward. A call to Arch Coal for comment was not returned.More: Wyoming coal leases linger, coal firm asks for more time Coal companies stalling on new lease applicationslast_img read more

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Wild and Scenic: 7 Protected Rivers and their Perks

first_imgThe National Wild and Scenic Rivers System was created in 1968 to preserve rivers with outstanding natural, cultural, and recreational values in free-flowing condition. To be considered a river must be free-flowing and have a least one aspect that is considered to be “outstandingly remarkable,” i.e. of importance to the region or nation. Rivers are classified as wild, scenic, or recreational and often a combination of the three. As of 2014, 12,709 miles of 208 rivers are protected under the National System. Here are a few of our favorite wild and scenic rivers in the Southeast and mid-Atlantic. Sipsey Fork—AlabamaWarrior River, Arcola, Alabama, Photo by Tim GageThe long, hot summers of Alabama make it difficult for trout to survive in most rivers in the state. However, near the northwestern corner of Alabama the Warrior River runs cool year-round, providing a suitable habitat for rainbow trout. Designated a wild and scenic river in 1988, Sipsey Fork of the Warrior River is home to Alabama’s only year-round trout fishing. Every month of the year the Alabama Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries Division (WFF) stocks about 3,000 rainbow trout, which are released near Smith Lake dam. Take a day to fly fish on the banks of the Warrior River, being sure to check the generation schedule of the dam beforehand. Water rises quickly and is slow to fall following power generation.Chattooga River—Georgia, South Carolina & North CarolinaChattooga River, Photo by Brenda WileyIn 1974, the Chattooga became the first river east of the Mississippi to be designated as wild and scenic, and it’s still one of the few remaining free-flowing rivers in the Southeast. The Chattooga begins in North Carolina and winds down to Lake Tugaloo which lies on the border of South Carolina and Georgia. A quarter mile protected corridor lies on both sides of the river, making it inaccessible by car. The undeveloped shores and dense forest provide a tranquil setting for a float down the river. Perhaps you’ve seen this area before in the 1972 movie Deliverance. While you can expect fewer hillbillies, the scenery and primitive ambience has not changed. Other than being a backdrop in Deliverance, the Chattooga is well-known for its excellent rafting. It is the only wild and scenic river that is commercially rafted and sports Class II-V rapids. A day trip (5-6 hours) will run you around $100 with the Nantahala Outdoor Center. Minimum age to raft on these waters is 8 years, or 13 on the more advanced section of the river.Lumber River—North CarolinaLumber River, Photo by Gerry DincherNorth Carolina has 144.5 miles of river designated as wild and scenic. Eighty-one of those miles are on the Lumber River, a waterway with a rich history and a significant number of rare plant and animal species. Numerous archaeological sites have been identified along the river, spanning four historical periods. The Lumber River was designated as wild and scenic in 1998, and has five different categories that are “outstandingly remarkable”—recreation, fish, wildlife, scenery, and botany. The most popular activities in the area are fishing and canoeing. The river travels through two physiographic regions, providing a variety of distinct settings for a multiple day canoeing venture. Trips can vary from a couple of hours to a couple of days. There are 24 access points along the river for a put in, making it easy to vary the length of a trip. The water is smooth and will make for a relaxing day or weekend of paddling.Obed River—TennesseeObed Wild and Scenic River, Lancing, TennesseeThe Obed River lies a little over an hour west of Knoxville, Tennessee. Dedicated in 1976, this river cuts below high cliffs that are popular among the rock climbing crowd. With gorges 500-feet deep and mid-range rapids, the Obed River is a destination for those looking for adventure. Climbing routes reach lengths of 200 feet and traverse challenging sandstone bluffs. Over 300 routes are offered, ranging from moderate to difficult, and the whitewater rapids range from Class II to Class IV. On a good day, boaters can float below climbers hanging high overhead on the cliffs. For more information, see https://www.nps.gov/obed/index.htm.Red River—KentuckyRed River Gorge, Photo by Stuart Randall SaffenThe Red River is a waterway in eastern Kentucky that was designated as wild and scenic in 1993. The area was designated as a Natural Historic Landmark because of the prehistoric and historic sites found around the river. More than 70 species of fish and 16 mussels inhabit the Red River, and the surrounding cliffs are the only home of the white-haired goldenrod, a rare flowering plant. While the river is usually too low for canoeing or kayaking, the corridor surrounding the Red River is a hot spot for hikers and rock climbers. The Red River Gorge is packed with rock shelters, boulders, and natural stone arches. “The Red,” as many climbers refer to the gorge, is considered one of the top 10 climbing destinations in the world by many because of its 2,000 climbing routes and the easy trails that lead to them. For a plethora of information about the climbing routes and where to find then, check out www.redrivergorgeclimbing.comBluestone River—West VirginiaBluestone River (West Virginia), Photo by Jeff DuganTen miles of river were designated as wild and scenic in southern West Virginia in 1988. This stretch of water is the Bluestone River, which flows through an 800-feet deep gorge and offers warm water fishing. Dubbed “Momongosenka” (Big Stone River) by the Native Americans for its boulder-rich lower gorge, the river was later renamed “Bluestone” after the blue limestone in the streambed. The water in the Bluestone is frequently too low to canoe, and isn’t a ride for thrill-seekers, but can be a nice place to swim in the summertime. Much of the land surrounding the river is part of the Bluestone Wildlife Management Area, which provides hunting opportunities and is known for its wild turkey population. Camping and fires are not permitted around the Bluestone National Scenic River.Allegheny River—PennsylvaniaPennsylvania has designated 409.3 miles of river as wild and scenic, 86.6 miles of which are part of the Allegheny River. This section of river was designated in 1992 and flows through both rural farmlands and wild forest, providing a diverse mix of scenery for boaters. This river is a nice place for family outings because of its easy access and few hazards. For a relaxing drive, try taking the 36-mile Longhouse National Scenic Byway. This byway circles the Kinzua Creek arm of the Allegheny Reservoir and passes through the Allegheny National Forest. Along the ride you will hit a campground, hiking trails and a boat launch, all of which should be enough to occupy the kids for the weekend.last_img read more

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Screaming Goats That Sound Like Terrified Humans

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Listen, I get it.You’re tired of watching the dang Harlem Shake video of dang Harlem Shake videos.Some of you (Sal) don’t even find the humor in it.Yet, we left it up for like 83 days.Why?Because I was sick.And because I hadn’t yet found a video of a bunch of goats screaming their little goat faces off.Thanks to Scott, I am now complete.And now YOU can witness goats in all of their terrified-human-like screaming glory.last_img read more

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Governor Wolf’s Week, February 12 – February 18, 2017

first_imgLike Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf By: Office of Governor Tom Wolf “I’m proud to stand — sit — here with you today to support your futures.” pic.twitter.com/Ik0sHZ4L6y— Governor Tom Wolf (@GovernorTomWolf) February 14, 2017 February 17, 2017 The Blog,  Weekly Update This week, Governor Wolf spoke out in opposition of Senate Bill 3. Joined by First Lady Frances Wolf, legislators, state officials, medical professionals, and women’s health advocates, the governor hosted press conferences and discussions on the bill in Philadelphia and Abington.On Tuesday, Governor Wolf was joined by pre-k students to announce that his 2017-2018 budget proposal includes a $75 million increase for early childhood education.The governor also highlighted his budget’s job creation initiatives in State College and improved services for seniors in Wilkes-Barre.Expanding Medicaid and healthcare coverage for Pennsylvanians has been a priority for Governor Wolf since he became governor. This week, Governor Wolf joined the Pennsylvania State Nurses Association in asking the PA delegation to prioritize affordable healthcare. The governor also sent a letter to the U.S. Senate Finance Committee to highlight the importance of Medicaid expansion.Governor Wolf’s Week, February 12 – February 18, 2017Monday, 2/13/17Governor Wolf Outlines a Better Way Forward, Details Importance of Entrepreneurship and 2017-2018 Budget Job Creation Initiatives While Visiting State CollegeIn Wilkes-Barre, Governor Wolf Discusses How His 2017-2018 Budget is a New Way Forward for SeniorsTuesday, 2/14/17Governor Wolf Joins Pennsylvania Nurses in Asking PA Delegation to Prioritize Quality, Affordable HealthcarePre-K Students Thank Governor Wolf for $75 Million Increase for Early Childhood Education in 2017-2018 BudgetGovernor Wolf Announces Veterans’ Trust Fund Grant AwardsWednesday, 2/15/17Governor Wolf Announces 51 New Jobs with Hearth & Home Technologies Expansion in Dauphin CountyGO-TIME: Department of Corrections Food Procurement Services and Management Software System Contract to Save an Estimated $16.6 Million Over Three YearsGovernor Wolf Joins Health Professionals, Advocates to Denounce Senate Bill 3Thursday, 2/16/17First Lady Frances Wolf Visits Radcliffe Learning Center, Highlights $75 Million Increase for Early Childhood Education in 2017-2018 BudgetGovernor Wolf Approves $1.4 Million to Support Nine Community Revitalization Projects StatewideGovernor Wolf Highlights Importance of Medicaid in Letter to U.S. Senate Finance CommitteeFriday, 2/17/17Governor and First Lady Wolf Join Health Professionals, Advocates, & Legislators to Denounce Senate Bill 3GO-TIME: L&I Renegotiates State Workers Insurance Fund Generic Drug Pricing, Saving $275,000 AnnuallyHighlights from Twitter#SB3 severely limits women’s ability to make informed decisions about their own health care. If #SB3 reaches my desk, I will veto it. pic.twitter.com/INGIL8vVge— Governor Tom Wolf (@GovernorTomWolf) February 16, 2017 SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Governor Wolf’s Week, February 12 – February 18, 2017last_img read more

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Buyers’ list of worries

first_imgThis is the stuff of nightmares for some home buyers. Picture: SuppliedFORGET a housing crash or risk of defaulting on mortgage payments – the biggest worry for property buyers is getting a home with unforeseen damage and hefty maintenance requirements.This is according to a new report which revealed the fear of owning a problematic home is so strong that home buyers consider foregoing building inspections as the biggest mistake they could make.More than four in five respondents of the ME Bank survey of 1000 Aussies viewed failing to pay the $500 to $1000 typically required for a building inspection as a major gamble.This was a greater number than those who saw buying off the plan or regional property as risky. Buyer’s agent Nicole Jacobs said the concern was warranted.“You wouldn’t buy a car without a roadworthy, so why wouldn’t you want to know the health of a property before buying it?” she said.“A building inspection gives you knowledge on what needs to be done and what costs there will be. If there’s nothing wrong then you will have the confidence to go forth with gusto.”Some of the other survey results were more surprising. Buying property with friends and family was considered the second biggest mistake buyers could make, with 62 per cent of respondents viewing it as a risk.Just under half of respondents considered getting an interest-only loan as a risk, while 45 per cent thought there was a danger in selling an existing home before buying the next one.Only a third of respondents thought there was a risk in buying their home via auction.Few respondents saw a problem in buying their home during winter, with just 14 per cent labelling it a risk.Financing a purchase with a lender outside of the big four was considered risky by 23 per cent and 38 per cent of respondents thought investing in regional real estate was a mistake.However, buying off the plan was one factor that weighted more heavily on buyers’ minds. Just over half of respondents considered it a significant risk and a third thought it was an average risk.Mr Nolan said one of the trickiest parts of buying off the plan was having a good feel for how the home would look once built.More from news01:21Buyer demand explodes in Townsville’s 2019 flood-affected suburbs12 Sep 202001:21‘Giant surge’ in new home sales lifts Townsville property market10 Sep 2020“You do need a healthy dose of imagination to picture how the finished product will look,” he said. “Do your homework into the developer and builder and seek independent advice on the contract of sale.”Auctioneer and licensed estate agent at Hockingstuart Simon Wendt said knowledge was key in any off the plan purchase.“Buying off the plan isn’t risky if you know what you’re getting and fully understand the dimensions, aspects and quality of finishes.”ME Bank’s head of home loans Patrick Nolan, referring to the 62 per cent of respondents cautious about buying with family or friends, said co-ownership agreements were probably viewed unfavourably because they restricted people’s ability to sell down the track.“It can be risky if one person wants to sell or situations change,” he said. “Co-buying offers valuable advantages because it means you can pool financial resources but I would suggest you have a formal co-ownership agreement in pace drafted by a solicitor.”Ms Jacobs agreed the arrangements required caution.“I view this as risky,” she said. “We are emotional beings and emotion can often lead to poor decisions.”Ms Jacobs advised that friends and family needed to enter contracts, even if they were close, otherwise it would ruin relationships.“You don’t want a house to be the death of a friendship or family relationship,” she said.last_img read more

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Batesville Launches International Sister School Relationship

first_imgAdministrators at Batesville High School are looking forward to an exchange program with a school in China.Batesville Community School Corporation and Pinghu Danghu (China) Senior High School recently signed a memorandum of understanding to share students and teachers beginning in 2014-15.In October, Batesville Superintendent Dr. Jim Roberts visited select schools including Pinghu Danghu in China.“I learned a different culture and learned about different schools,” Roberts noted. “It eventually led to the signing of a memorandum of understanding when we had a return visit from a school I visited.”The memorandum was signed Nov. 11.Roberts was impressed with some programs at Pinghu Danghu, and would eventually like to see select programs implemented locally.“They are very aligned with what their mission is as a school and what they expect their students to achieve. Everything they do is directed to achieving that,” expressed Roberts.Roberts explained some differences and similarities between both schools at the Board of Trustees meeting Monday evening. While students at Batesville typically have an 8-3p.m. school day, Pinghu Danghu students attend from 6:40-5p.m., and some until 9 p.m. depending on additional studies.The extended hours pay off, as Roberts noted nearly 99 percent of students at Pinghu Danghu attend post-secondary education after graduation.The exchange program could lead to some students from Batesville attending Pinghu Dangchu for two or three weeks, and vice versa.“A full year is a long commitment. We may not have parents ready to give up their child for a full year necessarily to China, a half a world away,” Roberts said. “But they may be willing to have their children do that for two or three weeks.”Mandarin Chinese language courses will be offered to Batesville students next year, along with the preexisting German and Spanish programs.BCSC Board of Trustees President Chris Lowery hopes the memorandum leads to future sister school relationships internationally.“The next stop for us is o reach an agreement with a school system in Germany,” Lowery said. “[Hillenbrand Inc.] and other companies in town have operations countries where Spanish is the predominant language.”“Just knowing the culture and people of other places in the world are very important,” Lowery added.Other School BusinessSchool Board members approved a calendar change for 2014-15. BCSC students have traditionally attended school on the Wednesday prior to Thanksgiving, however that will change next year. Due to the high volume of travel associated with the holiday, board members agreed to substitute Presidents Day as an in-school day to allow students a two-day week during Thanksgiving. A replacement day is required by law to fulfill the minimum number of student instruction days.All-State Students RecognizedSeveral student athletes were honored for exceeding on the classroom and on the field. Four members of the girls soccer team, four members of the boys soccer team and 2 cross-country academic all-state recipients were recognized during Monday’s board meeting.Coach Kyle Laker (from left) with Rebecca Roell, Megan Doll, Kelli Hartman, Kelsey Gausman.Members of the girls soccer team include: Rebecca Roell, Senior; Megan Doll, Junior; Kelli Hartman, Junior; and Kelsey Gausman, Junior.Roell plans on studying Exercise Science in college, while Doll hopes to pursue Radiology at the University of Southern Indiana or University of Cincinnati. Hartman will study Pre-pharmacy and Gausman is undecided.Members of the boys soccer team include: Andrew Grossman, Senior; John Krieger, Senior; Matt Weiler, Senior; and Seth Parker, Junior.Boys Soccer Coach Chris Fox (from left) with Andrew Grossman, John Krieger, Matt Weiler and Seth Parker.Coach Lisa Gausman (from left) with Kelsey Gausman and Elizabeth Cuttle.Grossman, who also received a National Merit Scholarship Program Commendation carries a 3.97 GPA at Batesville. He hopes to attend Purdue for Engineering. Krieger, the team MVP looks forward to attending UC, IU or Purdue for Business. Senior Matt Weiler will major in Computer Science at Miami (OH) and Parker is undecided.Kelsey Gausman also received an Academic All-State for Cross Country along with  Elizabeth Cuttle, Junior.last_img read more

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