JSS Karel Doorman, RFA Argus Perform Uncommon RAS

first_img Authorities View post tag: africa JSS Karel Doorman, the Netherlands Navy’s Joint Support Ship, conducted replenishment-at-sea (RAS) with Royal Navy’s RFA Argus.The two ships met off the coast of Freetown, Sierra Leone, and engaged in an unusual RAS. During supply operations the vessels are normally positioned next to each other, sailing in the same direction. In this case, both vessel had only the right side of the ship available for RAS.Supported by Dynamic Positioning System and anchor, the vessels safely undertook the operation transferring 550 tons of fuel.[mappress mapid=”14880″]Naval Today Staff, Image: The Netherlands Navy JSS Karel Doorman, RFA Argus Perform Uncommon RAS Share this article View post tag: RFA Argus View post tag: Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today JSS Karel Doorman, RFA Argus Perform Uncommon RAS View post tag: Naval View post tag: Uncommon View post tag: Perform View post tag: News by topic View post tag: JSS Karel Doorman View post tag: RAS January 8, 2015last_img read more

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KBR to install, modernize US Navy’s C4ISR systems

first_img View post tag: KBR KBR to install, modernize US Navy’s shore-based C4ISR systems View post tag: NAVWAR View post tag: C4ISR December 4, 2019, by KBR has been selected by the US Naval Information Warfare Systems Command (NAVWAR) to install shore-based command, control, communications, computer, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C4ISR) systems at locations worldwide.As informed, NAVWAR chose KBR as one of eight awardees on the Shore Global C4ISR Installations multiple-award indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract which has a maximum ceiling of $986 million and includes an initial five-year base plus a five-year option.Under the contract, KBR will perform se C4ISR maintenance, modernization and new system installation. These services can include decommissioning and modernization of existing shore facilities, program and project management, engineering designs and training as well as installation design and installation of integrated C4ISR systems.“KBR is ready to ensure that the military has the necessary tools to keep its advantage on physical and virtual battlefields,” said Byron Bright, KBR President, U.S. Government Solutions.“A modern, top line C4ISR infrastructure is essential to making real-time threat analysis that leads to actionable insight, reducing risk to valuable assets and people.”center_img Equipment & technology Back to overview,Home naval-today KBR to install, modernize US Navy’s shore-based C4ISR systems navaltoday Share this articlelast_img read more

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Research Assistant Professor – Crop Science

first_imgThe Research Assistant Professor is responsible for coordinationand management of research to improve planting, growing, andmarketing of crops. Research responsibilities will includedeveloping key plant physiological parameters and under changingclimate conditions for adoption and sustainability of local andalternate crops suitable to the region. The incumbent willestablish a program of research geared to incorporate innovativestate-of-the-art digital agriculture approaches to defining,understanding, and influencing sustainable crop growth around theenergy-food-water nexus. The research will be geared to helpimprove farm management practices for efficient crop productionusing cutting-edge technologies. The candidate will collaborate oninterdisciplinary research projects and provide service atdepartment, college, and university levels. The successfulcandidate will be required to seek and secure extramural researchfunding, contribute scholarly literature, and effectivelycommunicate research results to stakeholder groups. Teachingresponsibilities include the mentoring and supervision of studentsin the areas of crop production systems. This position complementsother Departmental and inter-Departmental programs, and USDAstatewide and regional initiatives on production including cropgenetics, variety development, disease resistance, and postharvestbiology. This position will help strengthen North Carolina’s smallfarm economic viability and environmental integrity by offeringrelevant, valuable, and timely information that is generated andaggregated from CAES, agriculture-related agencies, andorganizations. Within these systems, this position will connect adiverse set of actors including farmers, traditional extensionprofessionals, consultants, non-profits, government agencies, andothers. These networks will include both face-to-face personalrelationships and those mediated by communication technology. Thisposition will help connect farmers to a number of supportagricultural production agencies and organizations that will becritical to a farming success and sustainability. This mightinclude investigation of producing different crops, or low-costeffective approaches to reestablish the vitality of damagedcroplands or pastures or developing barriers that would helpwithstand major weather events.last_img read more

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FSA sets new targets for salt reduction in bakery

first_imgThe Foods Standards Agency (FSA) has published new salt reduction targets for food manufacturers for products including bread, cakes, biscuits and snacks. The FSA has launched a public consultation on proposals that will make its voluntary targets stricter. They include tightening 2010 salt reduction targets for 85 categories of food and setting more challenging 2012 targets for 80 categories of food.Bread manufacturers will be asked to reduce the amount of salt they use for 2012. While the FSA has suggested a 2012 target of a maximum of 0.93g of salt per 100g of bread, it is conducting research on whether this is viable.Gordon Polson, director of the Federation of Bakers (FoB), said it will be consulting with its members on the targets follo-wing research results. He said: “We have emphasised to the FSA that there are technological challenges in going beyond the 2010 target… the industry needs to be able to bake bread 24/7, 365 days a year and produce premium products that people still want to buy.”Polson said he was encouraged that the FSA had acknowledged the good work done by the industry in meeting the 2010 targets.FSA chief executive Tim Smith said: “The FSA is encouraged that action to reduce the average amount of salt we are eating on a daily basis is clearly having a positive impact. We recognise that the great steps taken by many manufacturers and retailers have contributed to this success.” Smith said there was “still plenty to do” to lower salt consumption. The consultation will close on 31 October, 2008.The government is keen for food manufacturers to reduce salt usage, as eating too much salt is a risk factor in developing high blood pressure.last_img read more

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Press release: Thousands to benefit from new English language programmes

first_img Email [email protected]gov.uk Media enquiries Social media – MHCLG General enquiries: please use this number if you are a member of the public 030 3444 0000 Contact form https://forms.communit… Today’s announcement also includes 8 successful local authorities who will be funded from the new English Language Coordination Fund.The fund will help local authorities and their local partners to improve the coordination of ESOL provision by proposing a better local offer for learners to suit their needs.This will include access to better information about provision for learners as well as offering single points of contact where learners can receive impartial information, advice and guidance and have their English language learning needs properly assessed.Case studies of learnersManchester City Council (Talk English)Shazia joined a Talk English course in Leeds to improve her English, gain confidence and be more independent, so that she didn’t have to rely on others. She also hoped that learning English will help her to support her child’s education and wellbeing.By taking part in Talk English, Shazia has started to talk to the staff at her child’s nursery and has taken her child to the doctors and the park by herself. Shazia has also taken part in some community events and speaks English with her neighbour, who is friendly to her.FaithActionJaheda had lived in the UK for 34 years but could not speak English and therefore rarely left the house. She suffered from severe depression.Creative English gave her the confidence, language skills and awareness of other opportunities in her community to go on to join another English class and the friendships to meet regularly with a group of women from different cultural backgrounds in a local coffee shop.Further informationWith almost 3,500 responses, the government’s Integrated Communities Strategy green paper last March set out proposals to support people to speak English, including a new community-based English language programme from April 2019 Twitter – https://twitter.com/mhclgFlickr – http://www.flickr.com/photos/mhclgLinkedIn – http://www.linkedin.com/company/mhclg This new programme will start in April and replaces and builds on the success of the existing community-based English language programme which has helped over 73,000 people to improve their English over the last 5 years.The successful bidders who will be funded from the new Integrated Communities English Language Programme include Redbridge Institute of Adult Education, FaithAction, Manchester Adult Education and TimeBank.Joni Cunningham, Principal of Redbridge Institute said: If your enquiry is related to COVID-19 please check our guidance page first before you contact us – https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-for-local-government.If you still need to contact us please use the contact form above to get in touch, because of coronavirus (COVID-19). If you send it by post it will not receive a reply within normal timescale.center_img Office address and general enquiries Speaking English is so crucial in our day-to-day lives – whether we’re helping our children with their homework or travelling on a bus to do the shopping. This new programme is focused on those people who may be isolated by their inability to speak the language and help them better integrate into life in this country by making good use of local services, becoming part of community life and mixing and making friendships with people from different backgrounds. Councils, charities and adult learning providers have been successful in their bids to receive a share of funding which will help adults with their English language skills, Communities Minister Lord Bourne announced today (28 February 2019).Everyone living in England should be able to speak and understand English, so they can integrate into life in this country and make the most of the opportunities of living in modern Britain.The government’s Integrated Communities English Language Programme and Coordination Fund aim to tackle one of the key causes of poor integration.The Integrated Communities English Language Programme will fund over 19,000 learner places, teaching in communities with a high proportion of adults who speak little or no English.The programme looks to support learners who may not have previously taken steps to learn English and will deliver classes that will improve proficiency in English, boost confidence and encourage integration.At a Talk English lesson held at Manchester Art Gallery, Communities Minister Lord Bourne said: 2 Marsham StreetLondonSW1P 4DF Please use this number if you are a journalist wishing to speak to Press Office 0303 444 1209 We are very excited to be part of this much needed innovative programme which will take English language teaching into the heart of our communities. Supporting people informally to take their first steps in learning English will break down barriers, raise ambitions to carry on learning and help people make more of their lives. Winners of £4.5 million Integrated Communities English Language Programme announced. A further £1.2 million will be given to successful winners of the English Language Coordination Fund to develop new coordination models. Both will help learners get the right type of English language provision to help them integrate into life in England.last_img read more

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Turkuaz Announces Extensive Fall Tour With Con Brio, The Suffers, And More

first_imgFunk powerhouse Turkuaz will embark on a massive tour this coming fall, with nearly 50 stops spanning coast-to-coast beginning in mid-September. In addition to previously announced dates with Sinkane throughout the West Coast, the band will be joined by Con Brio and The Suffers on select stops across the country, with Pimps of Joytime joining later for a pre-New Year’s Eve run in Boston and New Haven. The band will make a noteworthy stop at the newly opened Brooklyn Steel for a hometown throwdown in November, while continuing to dominate the festival circuit at events like Whale Rock Music Festival, Joshua Tree Music Festival, LEAF Festival, and Hangtown Music Festival.With the band’s recent nonstop trajectory, sitting in with Umphrey’s McGee and Mike Gordon this past weekend at Peach Festival and constantly ruling the national touring circuit, it would be a huge mistake to miss Turkuaz on tour. Visually, they’re a sight to behold, from synchronized dance moves down to a coordinated color scheme, but musically, they’re one of the tightest funk acts in the game right now.Live for Live Music is thrilled to be teaming up with the dynamic nine-piece to provide behind-the-scenes coverage, real-time recaps, and more updates from the road throughout the cross-country tour.Special, fan pre-sale tickets are available now at www.turkuazband.com ahead of general public on sale this Friday, Aug 18 @ 12pm local time.last_img read more

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Weather doesn’t affect ice cream consumption

first_imgEven with the changeable New England temperatures going up and down like a seesaw, few can forget the recent climb to a smoldering 102 degrees Fahrenheit. Frozen treats were one form of relief from the omnipresent heat, and the Harvard community sought them out wherever they could be found.In the summer, Annenberg Hall is the only place on campus where students can indulge in soft-serve frozen yogurt from 5:15 to 7:15 p.m. (During the academic year, all the dining halls serve it up.)“Students really love it,” says Martin Breslin, director for Culinary Operations at Harvard University Dining Services (HUDS), noting that vanilla is the most popular flavor, although the selection can range from graham cracker pie to cookies and cream to red velvet cake. Frozen yogurt makes way for the real thing on Sundays, when an ice cream sundae bar serves up Richardson’s ice cream with a full complement of toppings. And for those with delicate constitutions, frozen lactose-, dairy-, or soy-free alternatives are available upon request.But since none of the campus retail locations sell ice cream, many Harvard folk venture into the Square to satisfy their cravings. J.P. Licks, Pinkberry, BerryLine, and Yogurtland are all just steps away, as are Ben & Jerry’s and Lizzy’s.  And while a lot of ice cream and frozen yogurt is consumed on the hot, sunny days of summer, according to Breslin, consumption on campus is high year-round, with an increase during exam time.Bob Florio has worked at J.P. Licks for six years, and said it’s busiest in May, at the end of July, and August. Oreo cake batter is the store’s most popular flavor, and fudge the most popular topping. “We have the best fudge topping,” Florio said. He added that it’s busy all year, and people still order ice cream when it’s 10 degrees below zero outside.As July — National Ice Cream Month — winds down, the National Weather Service shows Cambridge’s temperatures going back up, so chances are you’ll find someone from the Harvard community dipping into a frozen delight.  For Harvard University Information Technology’s Jaime Bermudez it will be frozen yogurt, because it’s “healthier than ice cream,” he said as he topped off a cup with Cap’n Crunch at Yogurtland.Taylor Reiter ’15, who visits Yogurtland (or BerryLine, and sometimes Pinkberry) two to three times a week, said she loves a plain flavor with chocolate chips, or cookies and cream.Ali Almossawi, a former research associate at Harvard Business School who was back in town for a conference, had already been to J.P. Licks twice during his stay. “I miss it,” he said over a cup of chocolate brownie ice cream, confessing that he’d probably be back a few more times before he returns to San Francisco on Monday.last_img read more

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A playful turn for libraries

first_img Related A digital portrait of Colonial life Wealth of detail in wide-ranging archival project William Brewster was 14 when he started chronicling the habitat of birds and wildlife in Cambridge. He went on to document the changing natural landscape of his hometown for more than 50 years from the late 1800s into the 1900s.Brewster’s work, part of the collection at Harvard’s Ernst Mayr Library of the Museum of Comparative Zoology, represents an important resource in the study of the region’s natural history. One big problem, however, comes with transcribing the volumes of handwritten observations into digital text files that can be accessed and mined online.A new initiative is underway to use gaming and crowdsourcing to speed the massive task of transcribing such documents, at Harvard and around the world.The project, funded by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, enlists video gamers to help correct digital transcripts not easily converted into clean text files. Purposeful Gaming is a collaborative effort among the Missouri Botanical Garden, the Ernst Mayr Library, the New York Botanical Garden at Cornell University, and other members of an archives consortium called the Biodiversity Heritage Library. “What we hope is that people with an interest in games — but who want to do something useful as well — will find these games to be the perfect answer,” said Ernst Mayr librarian Constance Rinaldo. “People who love beautiful books and are fascinated by early scientific exploration, natural history, and games have an opportunity to help improve discovery of concepts in handwritten notes and other documents that are difficult to automatically transcribe.”The process under study is an alternative to optical character recognition (OCR), which converts images of text into encoded text files. OCR works well with uniform printed text, but less so with handwritten documents and certain typefaces.Ernst Mayr was chosen to be a partner in the grant because it was one of the first libraries in the consortium to digitize field notes and diaries. About a dozen volumes of Brewster’s diaries were used to test the effectiveness of the games.“Running these handwritten notes through optical character recognition is almost useless because it does not pick up the characters, and so it cannot be converted into text files reliably,” said Joseph deVeer, head of technical services in the Museum of Comparative Zoology. “In a nutshell, the Purposeful Gaming project was designed to feed multiple transcriptions through the game where players try to reconcile and determine which version is more accurate.”,Dartmouth College’s Tiltfactor, a digital design studio and research laboratory, created two video games for the project.The first, Smorball, resembles video football. Players can earn points by typing in words or phrases that pop up on the screen before they are tackled by the opposition. Beanstalk is a slower-paced game in which correct answers make the beanstalk grow.Through each game, players are helping to interpret and transcribe the scanned pages of Brewster’s work. For each word or phrase, a minimum of four players must provide an interpretation before the game software begins looking for matches and consensus in the answers.“The way it settles on one interpretation is when there have been at least four entries and one interpretation accounts for at least 75 percent of those entries, so it is based on consensus from the players about any word,” said Patrick Randall, the outreach coordinator at Harvard for Purposeful Gaming and the Biodiversity Heritage Library. “When enough people have picked an interpretation, the game will tag that word as complete. Once all the words for a single page of text have been tagged as complete, that text will be removed from the game.”The games have a diverse group of followers, from people connected to the Biodiversity Heritage Library community to those interested in citizen science to gamers just looking for a new challenge.In the fall, Tiltfactor brought Smorball and Beanstalk to the Boston Festival of Indie Games. In one day, a stream of players corrected more than 10,000 words on two laptops. Smorball was named the best serious game at the festival.Mary Flanagan, founder and director of Tiltfactor Laboratory and the Sherman Fairchild Distinguished Professor in Digital Humanities at Dartmouth College, said that the success of the games, in accuracy and popularity, should be an eye-opener.“There’s a great future to engaging the public with games that support cultural heritage,” said Flanagan. “That said, I think that this type of engagement and outreach has to be an integral mission for institutions, and they need to market such engagement opportunities just as they would an exhibition or special collection. I believe that these early projects provide proof of concept and promise in order for institutions to take that leap.”Library staffers at Harvard also see the potential for using gaming and crowdsourcing to widen access to old, handwritten documents and other challenging materials.For example, William Brewster’s records contain a wealth of data about climate, bird diversity, and habitat changes. The Ernst Mayr Library holds 45 years of Brewster’s journals, field notes, and manuscripts, and just one volume may number 450 pages. A trained transcriber would spend nearly 15 minutes typing each page into a text file.“With the project, 12 Brewster volumes were completed in less than a year,” said Randall. “Had those tools not been available and we just had library staff working on it — for one thing, we would not have been able to do that — but even if we did, it would take several years.”last_img read more

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Q&A: Carleen Porter-Internship in Italy

first_imgHow did you decide on this program?Last spring, I was going to be part of a UGA-sponsored program in Verona for three months. I contacted Amanda Stephens (CAES Associate Director of Student Engagement) about adding on the certificate internship. Amanda was able to work with the UGA veterinary school to secure a veterinary internship at the University of Perugia.What was it like settling in after your arrival?After a grand tour of the vet school by the director, I attempted to blend in with the vet students. During the first couple of weeks, I walked around to the different sections of the hospital. I quickly figured out that most of the action happened in the equine department. Since I already had experience in small animal surgery, I was excited to gain experience in large animal and joined the equine department!What activities did you engage in while in the equine department?The director of equine surgery realized that I was “the American,” so he gave me their uniform green scrubs and he and the other doctors basically took me under their wing. I was able to scrub in for surgeries every day, and I learned that there is a huge difference in small and large animal surgical procedures. Putting horses down for surgery is a much more stressful process than putting a dog or cat down, for instance. Surgeries are my favorite, so I loved being able to compare these surgeries to small animal surgeries I had seen before.Was there any particular case that sticks with you?One of my favorite cases was an ataxic foal that came to stay for a couple weeks. He was having seizures 24/7, so someone had to hold him and keep him from hurting himself at all times. He was on oxygen and had to be lifted up every thirty minutes. When the vet students needed a break, they let me take their job of sitting on the stall floor and gently holding him still. Once he became a bit healthier, he started nursing from his mother. The problem was that his mother didn’t “accept” him due to his health issues, so she would constantly try to kick and bite him while he was nursing. After I had proved my skill of holding him, they let me take him to his mother and help him nurse from her, whilst simultaneously trying to avoid kicks from her! It was a fascinating case, and he was pretty cute, too.How about life in Perugia? Were you able to get to meet a lot of new people?My favorite part of Perugia was how easily I could walk to town. I couldn’t help thinking that maybe if America was as pedestrian friendly as Europe, we would have a much more active society. My fitbit never had less than 20,000 steps every single day! I also made friends from different countries including Spain, Portugal and Russia. I met a Spanish girl my first week in Perugia who insisted that I “take an aperitivo” with her and a friend. Aperitivo is when you buy a drink and then get a buffet of appetizer foods; it became my new favorite tradition. It was great making these new friends because I was able to experience Italian culture from American and Spanish perspectives at the same time. I also enjoyed having dinner in Perugia because it involved sitting around and talking and sharing our day while we ate.How did this internship abroad affect your view of the world?The constant interactions with people from other countries helped me become more open to discussing uncomfortable subjects and different opinions. My Perugia friends were some of the friendliest people I have ever known, I only hope that I can return the favor and be so inviting to those visiting UGA, Georgia, and the states.Do you have any words for students considering the International Agriculture Certificate Program?Take the leap of faith. There are people willing to help you find the right program and a great number of scholarship opportunities. Before my trip I was focused on getting into vet schools in Georgia, but this experience has opened my mind to possibly looking at applying to veterinary schools outside of Georgia and even in Europe. I’m so grateful to have been able to have this experience of a lifetime!last_img read more

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Coal companies stalling on new lease applications

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Casper Star-Tribune:Coal companies used to grumble about how long it takes to get coal leased from the federal government. That’s no longer the case.Applications to lease nearly 1 billion tons of coal are pending in Wyoming, not because the federal agency tasked with performing environmental analysis is moving slow, but because coal companies are.Three lingering lease applications for Powder River Basin Coal are on the books: West Antelope 3, North Highlight and Maysdorf II South. In May, Cloud Peak Energy asked the Bureau of Land Management for a pause on one of those — an expansion at the Antelope Coal mine.The company said it needs more time to do baseline testing and consult with tribes, according to a letter obtained through a public records request by the Powder River Basin Resource Council, a Sheridan-based landowners’ group. Cloud Peak noted in its May letter that it supports the intent of the 2017 order from Interior, but that the company would need more time to work on the West Antelope 3. The lease is for 441 million tons of in-place coal near the Campbell and Converse County border.Cloud Peak also proposed Maysdorf II, a 233,550,000-ton application to lease adjacent to the Cordero Rojo mine south of Gillette. The company is currently “reconfiguring” that lease tract, according to the BLM.A third lease application proposed by Arch Coal in 2005 is pending. The 468 million ton North Highlight lease was one of a handful of coal lease applications analyzed by the BLM in the Wright area. A court case forced the agency to reevaluate the impact that leasing the coal would have on increasing greenhouse gases. A reassessment of that impact is currently out for public comment. It is unclear if Arch Coal will pursue those tons of coal going forward. A call to Arch Coal for comment was not returned.More: Wyoming coal leases linger, coal firm asks for more time Coal companies stalling on new lease applicationslast_img read more

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