HSE enraged by lower fines for breach of rules

first_imgHSE enraged by lower fines for breach of rulesOn 11 Nov 2003 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Dangerousemployers are repeatedly putting their workers’ lives at risk, because thefinancial penalties imposed by the courts are too low, it is claimed.Thelatest official figures show the majority of companies prosecuted for healthand safety offences are repeat offenders, who are seemingly undeterred by thefines.TimothyWalker, the HSE’s director general, said: “Why does the general level offines remain too low to deter companies from committing more serious offences?It’s incomprehensible that fines for especially serious breaches are only asmall percentage of those handed down for breaking financial rules.”Thereare currently  no set levels of finesfor companies convicted of causing illness, injury or death, with the judgedeciding the amount that should be paid.Theaverage fine has fallen in the past 12 months, from £11,141 to £8,828. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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McGrath and ‘Together’ slate sweep Michaelmas 2019 Union election

first_imgMcGrath declined to comment to Cherwell on the election result. Two independents, Mo Iman and ex-Logistics Officer Nikhil Shah, complete the seven-member standing committee. Candidates on McGrath’s ‘Together’ slate also secured the positions of Librarian-Elect (Mahi Joshi), Treasurer-Elect (Shining Zhao), and Secretary (Amelia Harvey). Brendan McGrath will be Union President next Michaelmas after receiving 84 more first preferences than rival James Lamming. Three out of the four Standing Committee candidates nominated by the ‘Together’ slate also won election, compared to two of Lamming’s six candidates for the ‘Engage’ slate. However, ‘Engage’ had some success in the election, as the most popular candidates in both the Standing Committee election (Spencer Cohen) and Secretary’s Committee election (Chengkai Xie) were from the slate. “I am immensely proud of the team myself and my officers put together.” Those members elected will be expected to follow through with the pledges made in their manifestos. The ‘Together’ slate claimed that it would introduce member-speaker roundtable events, make the Union’s financial accounts transparent by publishing a fully audited account online, and implement a strict ‘zero tolerance’ policy on bullying. The ‘Engage’ slate’s pledges included a bar happy hour with pints costing £1, livestreaming events on the Oxford Union app, and holding more female-led debate events. The election of Brendan McGrath as president of the Oxford Union comes after a turbulent term for the current Librarian, after members saw a motion for impeachment being filed against him, and his first candidate for Treasurer, Lee Chin Wee, being disqualified from running for the position. Speaking to Cherwell about the result, James Lamming said: “Whilst this obviously was not the result the Engage team had hoped for, I can without any doubt say that Brendan will put together a fantastic term card, as one of the most diligent and dedicated members of Union committee I have ever worked with during my time at Oxford. McGrath, Joshi and Zhao will serve their terms as officers in Michaelmas Term 2019, while Secretary-elect Amelia Harvey will assume her post next term in Trinity.last_img read more

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U.S. EPA And DOT Propose Fuel Economy Standards For 2021-2026 Vehicles

first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) released a notice of proposed rulemaking, the Safer Affordable Fuel-Efficient (SAFE) Vehicles Rule for Model Years 2021-2026 Passenger Cars and Light Trucks (SAFE Vehicles Rule), to correct the national automobile fuel economy and greenhouse gas emissions standards to give the American people greater access to safer, more affordable vehicles that are cleaner for the environment.The SAFE Vehicles Rule is the next generation of the Congressionally mandated Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) and Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards. This Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) is the first formal step in setting the 2021-2026 Model Year (MY) standards that must be achieved by each automaker for its car and light-duty truck fleet.In today’s proposal, EPA and NHTSA are seeking public comment on a wide range of regulatory options, including a preferred alternative that locks in MY 2020 standards through 2026, providing a much-needed time-out from further, costly increases. The agencies’ preferred alternative reflects a balance of safety, economics, technology, fuel conservation, and pollution reduction. It is anticipated to prevent thousands of on-road fatalities and injuries as compared to the standards set forth in the 2012 final rule. The joint proposal initiates a process to establish a new 50-state fuel economy and tailpipe carbon dioxide emissions standard for passenger cars and light trucks covering MY 2021 through 2026.“We are delivering on President Trump’s promise to the American public that his administration would address and fix the current fuel economy and greenhouse gas emissions standards,” said EPA Acting Administrator Andrew Wheeler. “Our proposal aims to strike the right regulatory balance based on the most recent information and create a 50-state solution that will enable more Americans to afford newer, safer vehicles that pollute less. More realistic standards can save lives while continuing to improve the environment. We value the public’s input as we engage in this process in an open, transparent manner.”“There are compelling reasons for a new rulemaking on fuel economy standards for 2021-2026,” said Secretary Elaine L. Chao. “More realistic standards will promote a healthy economy by bringing newer, safer, cleaner and more fuel-efficient vehicles to U.S. roads and we look forward to receiving input from the public.”The current standards have been a factor in the rising cost of new automobiles to an average of $35,000 or more—out of reach for many American families. Indeed, compared to the preferred alternative in the proposal, keeping in place the standards finalized in 2012 would add $2,340 to the cost of owning a new car, and impose more than $500 billion in societal costs on the U.S. economy over the next 50 years.Additionally, a 2018 government study by NHTSA shows new model year vehicles are safer, resulting in fewer deaths and injuries when involved in accidents, as compared to older models. Therefore, the Administration is focused on correcting the current standards that restrict the American people from being able to afford newer vehicles with more advanced safety features, better fuel economy, and associated environmental benefits.On April 2, 2018, EPA issued the Mid-Term Evaluation Final Determination which found that the MY 2022-2025 GHG standards are not appropriate and should be revised. For more than a year, the agencies worked together to extensively analyze current automotive and fuel technologies, reviewed economic conditions and projections, and consulted with other federal agency partners to ensure the most reliable and accurate analysis possible.EPA and NHTSA are seeking public feedback to ensure that all potential impacts concerning today’s proposal are fully considered and hope to issue a final rule this winter.The public will have 60 days to provide feedback once published at the Federal Register. Details can be found at NHTSA’s website here and EPA’s website here.last_img read more

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SUMMER ENRICHMENT

first_img× SUMMER ENRICHMENT — Students in the Bayonne 150 Summer Enrichment Program are seen here with their teacher, Mr. Tonnesen, Assistant Superintendent Degnan, Assistant Superintendent Kopacz and 1st Ward Councilman, Neil Carroll. Thanks to a grant from the Bayonne Education Foundation, participating students will spend the month of July learning about different aspects of Bayonne, past, present and future. Last week’s classes culminated in student presentations of their plans to address environmental issues and homelessness in Bayonne as well as the district’s uniform policy.last_img read more

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Pret chief executive Clive Schlee to step down

first_imgClive Schlee is to retire as CEO of Pret A Manger at the end of September, but will remain with the company as a non-executive director.Until he leaves, Schlee will be working on the transition of his successor Pano Christou, currently chief operating officer (COO).“There is never an easy time to stop being CEO of a wonderful company, but with the completion of our EAT deal tomorrow, and the roll-out of the Pret Allergy Plan, now is a good time for a new CEO to take Pret on the next stage of its journey,” said Schlee.“I’m really pleased Pano is taking over. He knows our shops through and through and will keep Pret true to the values that have underpinned its success.”Pano Christou started as an assistant manager in Carnaby Street Pret 19 years ago, working his way up to become managing director of Pret UK in 2014 and COO at the start of this year.He said: “I am honoured to follow Clive as CEO. Pret has big plans for the next few years – integrating EAT, developing Veggie Pret, delivering our digital transformation, and leading the way in supporting customers with allergies. I want to thank Clive for his leadership over the last 16 years, and we look forward to building on his legacy.”last_img read more

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At The Drive-In Releases “Governed By Contagions”, Their First New Song In 16 Years

first_imgPost-hardcore legends At The Drive-In have officially released their first new song in 16 years. The new track, “Governed By Contagions”, comes from their forthcoming album, which will be released at some point in 2017. The track features the guitar fireworks that we’ve come to expect from Omar Rodriguez Lopez, pulsating drums, and the incredible vocal range of Cedric Bixler-Zavala, who seems to be all-systems-go after his vocal chord injury earlier this year that forced the band to cancel several of their comeback shows.Listen to “Governed By Contagions” below! We’ll provide more information on the new At The Drive-In album as it’s announced.last_img read more

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A better sense of place

first_imgImagine trying to find your way across open water with no landmarks and no point of reference. That was the challenge that faced European navigators who launched the Age of Discovery in the 15th century, leaving behind known ports and coastlines to ply the Atlantic and, ultimately, Pacific oceans. Out of sight of land, these sailors relied on the sun and stars, traveling routes known to other explorers ― and to pirates ― and hoping to arrive safely at their destinations. While sailors had long known how to determine latitude, they entered the 18th century still lacking a way to determine a corresponding coordinate while at sea. No wonder, then, that the race to find a way to determine longitude ― finally solved in 1773 ― was the prevailing challenge of the day. It is also the topic of “Lost Without Longitude,” a lecture to be given at 6 p.m. Thursday by Alyssa Goodman, professor of astronomy at Harvard University, who was recently named the Harvard Foundation for Intercultural and Race Relations’ 2015 Scientist of the Year. The talk will be held at Pfizer Lecture Hall.GAZETTE: How important is longitude?GOODMAN: It is one of the two coordinates that we use to measure where we are on Earth, and there are many reasons that we need to know where we are on Earth.GAZETTE: How did sailors navigate without it?GOODMAN: A large variety of ways, and they often didn’t make it. The most common way is that they didn’t go very far from land so they could see landmarks and places they had mapped. Or you could “sail the latitude.” It’s easier to find your latitude at sea than your longitude — that involves tracking the position of the stars, and we’ve been doing that for thousands of years. Even if you don’t understand why the stars move the way they do, there are repeatable patterns that we observe.You can pick a latitude and just sail along it until you get in sight of land. Or, alternatively, pick a latitude and go right or go left. But [the problem without longitude is that] you don’t know how far you have gone: You can run out of supplies, you can have mutinies, you can’t explore new places because you don’t know where you are. That was the Columbus problem — he predicted India but he didn’t know North America was in the way.The other way was to use the relatively crude form [of navigating] known as dead reckoning. That’s where you know where point A and point B are. If you track how fast you are going, frequently, and you take a reading of what direction you are going in, you can kind of plot out a path. It might be a series of a little line segments, northeast at 20 knots for an hour then northwest at 10 knots for two hours. … But the errors compound. If the previous one was wrong, your true position will get farther and farther from the calculated position.Pirates made a lot of money because this sailing at latitude was less dangerous, so the pirates could just hang out at the popular latitudes and wait for ships to come by. So you’d try dead reckoning in part to avoid pirates, but it was a lot more dangerous.GAZETTE: You are going to be offering a course, “PredictionX,” as part of HarvardX. How does this fit with predictions?GOODMAN: The course is a giant two-year effort that involves 25 faculty. I’m the host. We’ve got people who are expert on how humans have predicted their future since very ancient times, Babylonian sheep entrails to now, where we’re worried about climate change simulation and epidemiology. But the middle of that story is the story of predicting your course.GAZETTE: Could you find your longitude, if you were cast adrift?GOODMAN: Yes, using my iPhone. Until it ran out of power.last_img read more

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China’s leadership during the COVID-19 outbreak

first_imgAsh: How would you characterize China’s President Xi Jingping’s leadership during the coronavirus epidemic?Saich: I think his leadership’s gone through two distinct phases. The first was, as in other countries, the inability to recognize the severity of the disease. That was shown by his initial low profile in dealing with the response. Once, however, he was made fully aware of the severity of the problem and the possible threat it might make to the credibility of the Chinese Communist Party, he’s put himself front and center as directing the response.Ash: Can you compare Xi’s response to that of China’s leadership during the 2003 SARS epidemic?Saich: The basic point is that no, they didn’t learn from the SARS epidemic. It was a failure of governance. We all know that wet markets [open-air markets selling live fish, meat, and wild animals] breed these kinds of problems. It was what occurred with SARS. It’s what occurred now with COVID-19. The ineffective regulation of the wet markets clearly shows that even when China has perhaps strong legislation at the national level, the real problem is it doesn’t get implemented properly at the local level. With no external-disciplining mechanism, that means things can just get left alone to fester.That said, they’ve learned to move quickly with the pro-party, pro-government propaganda. That took them a bit longer with SARS. They were kind of flailing around for a period of time than before they knew what their response should be.Ash: What’s been the Chinese public’s response to handling the crisis?Saich: Again, I think it’s gone through different phases. The initial response, as with SARS, was, “What is going on here? It seems like we’re being lied to.” Since then, I would say that there’s been a more mixed response. I think some citizens are still not 100 percent convinced that the government is being truthful with them. My sense is that there’s more satisfaction now that this is under control.Ash: Does Xi run the risk of being blamed if the virus is shown not to be under control?Saich: Possibly. If we look at the trajectory of Xi’s rule, it has been to centralize more and more authority within Beijing — and within Beijing, to centralize more and more authority with himself. The praise he gets really places him not only in a preeminent position but in a vulnerable position. I think there is not just pushback around the coronavirus but, more generally, there’s been pushback on other issues: How did you get into this fight with the United States? What about Belt and Road? What about territorial issues in the South China Sea? All of those have tarnished the image of the Chinese leadership, and I think that has caused Xi Jinping to pull back somewhat. Read Full Story The Ash Center sat down with Tony Saich, Daewoo Professor of International Affairs at Harvard Kennedy School and Center Director, for a conversation about the impact of China’s COVID-19 response on the country’s leadershipQ&ATony Saichlast_img read more

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Festival Recap: Tom Tom Founders Festival 2018

first_imgCalling all Charlottesvillians! We’ve finally made it to home base #1 for the 2018 season. We’ve spent the last few days sorting, packing, unpacking, and then repacking gear for the tour. We’ve been working on the van a lot too. Roxy finished our backsplash while I organized our gear drawers and made sure that we have all of the toys that we might want this spring. We also had the pleasure of taking part in our first two events of the season. Tom Tom Founders Festival 2018 and our annual Saturday morning group bike ride.Tom Tom Fest (for those unfamiliar) is an annual festival-style celebration that plays out right in the heart of downtown Charlottesville, VA. TTFF is a weeklong event that seems to take over the whole city. Celebrating local entrepreneurship, culture, and innovation the week-long event culminates in a giant block party on Friday and Saturday.As usual, you could find us under the Blue Ridge Outdoors tent in Emancipation Park talking with people about their favorite hikes in the area and giving out some of our favorite backpacking tips. We were lucky enough to have some incredible weather the entire weekend. Saturday morning was sunny and 70 degrees with a cool spring breeze. The Blue Ridge Outdoors crew teamed up with Blue Ridge Cyclery to host a family-friendly group bike ride along the Rivanna Trail from Darden Towe Memorial park to Riverview Park and back. For some of us looking to stretch their legs a little more, we had the option to ride the dirt path on the opposite side of the river as well. We had a great turn-out and Blue Ridge Cyclery even brought a fleet of mountain bikes for riders to ride.TTFF weekend is always a blast here in Charlottesville. This year seemed a little different. People seemed to have a little more appreciation for the humans around them. The vibe was excellent and a good time was had by all.Next up, we have our first water event of the year. Tuck Fest in Charlotte, NC! Come paddle your hearts out and listen to some free jams from The Wood Brothers, the Infamous String Dusters, Shaky Graves and more.If you like the gear we’re reppin’, or what we’re wearing, check out some of the sponsors that make this tour possible: Crazy Creek, National Geographic, RovR Products, Sea to Summit, Mountain House, LifeStraw, and Lowe Alpine.last_img read more

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The Emporium in Patchogue Out of Business

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The Emporium, a popular bar and music venue in the heart of downtown Patchogue, abruptly closed its doors Friday.No reason was publicly stated for the closure, a message on the venue’s website gave no clues and its Facebook page appears to have been disabled. It was still advertising upcoming events for this month, including a beer festival and a charity concert, as of Thursday evening.“Out of business,” the website states. “The Emporium is officially closed. Sorry for the inconvenience. Thank you for your understanding.”The venue, which hosted a mix of big name and up-and-coming hip hop, rock and cover acts, was semi-regularly in the news over its nearly five years in existence.Last fall, it hosted a campaign rally for then-Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, triggering protests nearby.In February 2016, a rapper from Ohio was arrested for allegedly firing a gun outside The Emporium after he opened for the hip hop group Bone Thugs-N-Harmony.In March 2016, a co-owner, Frank Profeta, testified at the federal corruption trial of ex-Suffolk County Conservative Party Chairman Ed Walsh.And one of the venue’s other co-owners, Timothy Lorito, filed a lawsuit against Suffolk County police officers that he accused of beating him after bouncers ejected an officers’ son from the club in 2013. That suit is pending in Central Islip federal court, records show.Profeta did not respond to a request for comment. In a statement issued Monday, Lorito blamed “differences in agreement between its owners and partners” for the closure.“I would like to thank our patrons for five wonderful years of serving the Long Island community with great live entertainment,” he said. “Let it be known that I have worked only in the capacity as a silent partner for the past eight months, and apologize for any inconvenience this closure has caused for those who had organized upcoming events, as the properties landlord is responsible for deposit returns on all cancellations as per our contract. I hope that any issues can be resolved, and these events relocated.”last_img read more

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